Author Topic: Vulcan VC2S V001 - Peregrine Lander - CCSFS SLC-41 - 8 Jan 2024 (07:18 UTC)  (Read 415658 times)

Offline Newton_V

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Beginning to question my sanity - or more precisely - calc routines 🤔

I'm getting 85 Deg NE azimuth from Cape if going to lunar orbit plane. But seems high value as that would mean " flying" up close to the eastern states?First stage fairly certain would impact Atlantic ocean . Also could be done as taking 2nd stage to orbit.

Any one else had a crack at it?

Of course different scenario if going to take option of doing plane change later in mission?
Flight azimuth is measured east of north.
I think the flight azimuth is 90 deg.  (due east)

Offline Apollo-phill

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Thnxs would make more sense.

But more I think about it more likely do plane change burn/s later in mission IF going to go into lunar orbit plane or other plane about Moon.

A more reasonable scenario on this first launch would be have good tracking/telemetry coverage during ascent to orbit - which is better provided along the eastern flight paths and azimuths.


BUT would be great if NASA or Astrobotic or ULA gave few more tech details of intended flight plan - though appreciate is both a commercial operation and - from Vulcan view - later military launches.
So don't want give competition many details  😀



Phill

Offline Apollo-phill

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Peregrine is headed for the western edge of Mare Imbrium.

The Apollo 15 mission in July 1971 headed for Hadley Rille region on eastern side of Mare Imbrium.

As a " close comparison" (??) looking at the launch azimuth for the Saturn V/Apollo 15 it was 90 Deg at pad liftoff then rolled to azimuth 80.088 degrees reaching an orbit around Earth just under 12 minutes after launch.

Vulcan likely do similar ?

Phill

Offline Jim

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A more reasonable scenario on this first launch would be have good tracking/telemetry coverage during ascent to orbit - which is better provided along the eastern flight paths and azimuths.



Not really, Vulcan will use TDRS

Offline Apollo-phill

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Jim

Thnxs for TDRS info.

Do you know - being so close to launch campaign 🤠 what flight azimuth is after liftoff ?

Also if TLI will be over Pacific which I'm assuming as it's a daylight launch?

Appreciated if you do 🚀

Will you be attending launch or will you be gator hunting 😅

Phill
UK
« Last Edit: 11/29/2023 03:50 pm by Apollo-phill »

Offline Jim

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Jim

Thnxs for TDRS info.

Do you know - being so close to launch campaign 🤠 what flight azimuth is after liftoff ?

Also if TLI will be over Pacific which I'm assuming as it's a daylight launch?

Appreciated if you do 🚀

Will you be attending launch or will you be gator hunting 😅

Phill
UK


It's Christmas, will be home.

Offline FutureSpaceTourist

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Offline FutureSpaceTourist

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https://twitter.com/spaceflightnow/status/1729939197933318206

Quote
Happening now: NASA is discussing the launch of one of the first Commercial Lunar Payload Services (CLPS) to the Moon: Peregrine-1 with @astrobotic.

Launch aboard a @ulalaunch Vulcan rocket is NET Dec. 24.

Follow along for updates. 🧵1/n


2/ Here are the participants in today's teleconference:
• Joel Kearns, deputy associate administrator for Exploration, Science Mission Directorate,
NASA Headquarters in Washington
• Ryan Watkins, program scientist, Exploration Science Strategy and Integration Office,
NASA Headquarters
• Chris Culbert, project manager, CLPS, NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston
• John Thornton, CEO, Astrobotic, Pittsburgh

3/ Kearns notes the CLPS mission uses fixed-price service contracts as opposed to traditional spacecraft development contracts.

Points to CLPS progress in helping spur development of 5 different landers.

Quotes @Dr_ThomasZ saying each landing attempt is like a shot on goal.

4/ 5 NASA-sponsored payloads (first four pictured):

Laser Retroreflector Array (LRA)
Linear Energy Transfer Spectrometer (LETS)
Near InfraRed Volatiles Spectrometer System (NIRVSS)
Neutron Spectrometer System (NSS)
Peregrine Ion-Trap Mass Spectrometer (PITMS)

5/ Culbert notes that to date, no private company has successfully landed on the Moon.

"NASA leadership is aware of the risks and has accepted that some of these missions may not succeed. But even if landing isn't successful, CLPS has already had an impact."

6/ Thornton describes this moment as "awe inspiring and humbling."

They began booking customers back in 2014. There are 20 payloads onboard this first mission, with seven national represented.

He says landing is Jan. 25, assuming launch on Dec. 24.

7/ Thornton, discussing the challenge of launching to the Moon and launching on a new rocket, points to ULA's "stellar" track record for their confidence on their ticket to ride.

8/ Asked about lessons learned regarding integrating science payloads for future lander missions, Thornton says "We've learned a ton with just the progression of mission one to mission two."

"Every time we attempt one of these, we're going to get smarter and smarter."

9/ Culbert says they've learned about supply chains and company resiliency.

He says the important lessons on the CLPS side has been defining requirements and the process in the contract side of things.

10/ Regarding launch windows, Thornton says they will launch into a trans-lunar injection to intersect with the Moon's orbit.

Once they get to the Moon in a few days, they will go from a high orbit then to a medium orbit and then descend to the lowest orbit before landing.

11/ Thornton says they don't think about competitors much, but wants to see a robust lunar economy for success across the board.

He says they expect to operate for 10 Earth days, but w/ a "lunar night" of about two weeks after, they likely won't be able to restart the lander.

12/ Thornton says they have a plate heading to the Moon with all the Astrobotic employees' signatures on it.

They also held a contest for a token from Pittsburgh to head up as well. They're sending up a token from Kennywood, a Pennsylvania them park.

13/ The name "Peregrine" was chosen for the lander because it's the name of the fastest flying bird on Earth.

14/ If launching on Dec. 24, 25 or 26, Thornton says landing would be on Jan. 25 in order to land at the most successful time for all the payloads.

15/ Thornton says because @ispace_inc was transparent with what went wrong with their mission, Astrobotic was able to take some lessons.

"Collectively as a species, the more we go after the Moon with more launches, the smarter we will get."

16/ In response to our question, Culbert says NASA worked with Astrobotic to de-manifest several payloads in order to launch as soon as possible.

He says the five that were removed from the flight (below) will fly on future CLPS flights.

17/ Regarding those payloads pulled from this flight, Watkins says the original landing sight chosen didn't have quite as high of a scientific return.

She reiterates that all the removed payloads will fly on future flights and so no science is being lost, just delayed.

18/18 Thornton says "we just can't share" the January launch dates, but says "we know what they are."

He says the Peregrine lander will take about 12 days to reach lunar orbit.

This wraps up the briefing. Read more about the mission here:


Offline Apollo-phill

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Happy Christmas to you Jim 🎄

I thought you may have been on site on Christmas Eve but enjoy your R&R instead 🏝️

"Gator hunting" was tongue in cheek humour from UK 🤓.

And thanks for all the comments over the years  - they ARE appreciated by the community from someone knowledgeable and onsite. And who is plugged into " engineering astronautics" Phill


Offline GewoonLukas_

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Lukas C. H. • Hobbyist Mission Patch Artist 🎨 • Ad Astra Per Aspera ✨️

Offline Apollo-phill

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Now we know 🚀

Flight azimuth 90 degrees

"TLI" over Pacific


Offline Apollo-phill

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I just reworked my numbers for launch azimuth now know inclination using

log sin Az = log cos 30.07 - log cos 28.6 and works out to 90 Deg.😅 as per ULA image above.

Phill

Offline FutureSpaceTourist

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Quote
@torybruno  Are there any updates of Vulcan Centaur WDR?

https://twitter.com/torybruno/status/1730198708938027298

Quote
On track. Soon. When the final coordination on the date is set, we’ll announce

Offline LouScheffer

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I just reworked my numbers for launch azimuth now know inclination using

log sin Az = log cos 30.07 - log cos 28.6 and works out to 90 Deg.😅 as per ULA image above.

Phill
I think almost all direct trajectories from the Cape to the moon will start with a due East launch.  I'm not a trajectory guru, but here's my reasoning.  The Moon's orbit around the Earth is tilted about 5o to the ecliptic.  The Earth's equator is tilted about 23o.  Therefore the maximum tilt of the plane of the Moon's orbit, compared to the equator of the Earth, is about 28o.  Assuming an elliptical transfer orbit, the injection spot will be precisely opposite the moon, on the other side of the Earth.  So it will be somewhere with latitude less than 28o.  But Cape Canaveral is at a latitude of 28.5o.  It can launch directly into any orbit with greater than this inclination, but for anything less the best you can do is to launch due East, then do the injection when you get to the right latitude.

Lots of approximations here - you don't aim directly at the moon, need to account for launch windows, need telemetry during the TLI burn, and so on - but I suspect the minimum delta-V solution will never be far from due East.

This same line of argument explains why European planetary missions from French Guiana often start with an Earth flyby about 1 year later, often with no maneuvering in between.  This would seem to be pointless, as the spacecraft will return with exactly the same energy state, so why not just launch a year later?  But following the argument above, if the magic spot has a latitude of more than French Guiana's 7o (true for many interplanetary launch windows), then to get there you need to launch, then wait for the spacecraft to get to the right latitude, then inject.  But Ariane 5 cannot relight, and hence cannot use this strategy.   So they direct inject into an Earth-return orbit, and use the flyby to target the interplanetary trajectory.

Offline Apollo-phill

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Centaur V stage questions

Anyone know if it is using IVF GH2 &GO2 ( like ACES was going to )  for RCS  thrusters

Anyone have either good cutaway/schematic diagram showing showing RCS pods on Centaur V

OR

Good closeup image of RCS pod on Centaur V

During TLI burn do we know for certain they will use RCS for pitch/roll/ yaw to the new spacecraft plane to HEO from the LEO If so, anyone have orbital parameter numbers for this HEO

Thnxs in advance

 

Offline Apollo-phill

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Just to clarify my last post
HEO is the high Earth orbit of 3 - 33 days that Peregrine will loiter in before transfer to Moon and NOT the heliocentric orbit that Centaur V will end life on.
😄


Offline Apollo-phill

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Per Astrobotic User Guide it is Peregrine engine that will undertake the TLI burn to put spacecraft on journey to Moon


Centaur V being used only for placement to the HEO from launch
 (Have they dropped option of LEO then HEO then TLI for this mission)
Then of course the heliocentric burn

Offline Apollo-phill

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Further search found this ULA image of Centaur V with RCS pod shown

Phill

Offline AS_501

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Thanks all for chasing the VC launch azimuth question.
I read somewhere that Centaur will communicate through TDRS at least part of the time.  Can that happen when Centaur is beyond geostationary orbit?
Launches attended:  Apollo 11, ASTP (@KSC, not Baikonur!), STS-41G, STS-125, EFT-1, Starlink G4-24, Artemis 1
Notable Spacecraft Observed:  Echo 1, Skylab/S-II, Salyuts 6&7, Mir Core/Complete, HST, ISS Zarya/Present, Columbia, Challenger, Discovery, Atlantis, Dragon Demo-2, Starlink G4-14 (8 hrs. post-launch), Tiangong

Offline Jim

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Thanks all for chasing the VC launch azimuth question.
I read somewhere that Centaur will communicate through TDRS at least part of the time.  Can that happen when Centaur is beyond geostationary orbit?

No, it will use ground stations for high altitudes

 

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