Author Topic: Interlune moon start-up to harvest moon resources  (Read 1461 times)

Online FutureSpaceTourist

  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 47512
  • UK
    • Plan 28
  • Liked: 80383
  • Likes Given: 36361
https://www.geekwire.com/2023/blue-origin-gary-lai-interlune-pathfinder-conner/

Quote
Blue Origin’s chief architect lifts the veil on stealthy moon startup at Pathfinder Awards

BY ALAN BOYLE on October 29, 2023 at 10:52 pm

Gary Lai’s resume features his status as chief architect and pioneer spaceflier at Jeff Bezos’ Blue Origin space venture — but when he received a Pathfinder Award this weekend at Seattle’s Museum of Flight, the veteran engineer highlighted a lesser-known job, as co-founder and chief technology officer of a moon-centric startup that’s still in stealth mode.

“We aim to be the first company that harvests natural resources from the moon to use here on Earth,” Lai told an audience […]

The Tacoma, Wash.-based startup, called Interlune […]

Other founders are Rob Meyerson (former Blue Origin president) and Apollo 17 astronaut Jack Schmitt.

Company has apparently been going 3 years but us still in stealth mode.

Offline Danderman

  • Extreme Veteran
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 10280
  • Liked: 682
  • Likes Given: 721
Re: Interlune moon start-up to harvest moon resources
« Reply #1 on: 11/07/2023 03:35 am »
You already know what I am going to write:

If they find anything valuable on the Moon, China will be there quickly to extract the discovered materials. The OSTA does provide some protection for operations on the Moon, but having claimjumpers is going to be an investor deterrent, particularly if the China deliver mining hardware first.

The solution is a mining claims registry, but that is fodder for another topic.

Offline Eric Hedman

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2300
  • The birthplace of the solid body electric guitar
  • Liked: 1947
  • Likes Given: 1128
Re: Interlune moon start-up to harvest moon resources
« Reply #2 on: 11/07/2023 05:57 am »
Other founders are Rob Meyerson (former Blue Origin president) and Apollo 17 astronaut Jack Schmitt.
Harrison Schmitt is 88 years old.  I like the fact that he is a co-founder of a startup at that age.

Offline matt19215

Re: Interlune moon start-up to harvest moon resources
« Reply #3 on: 02/07/2024 08:22 pm »
https://techcrunch.com/2024/02/07/ex-blue-origin-leaders-secretive-lunar-startup-interlune-has-moonshot-mining-plans/

Bunch of new info here. Plans lunar demos in 2026 and 2028 and operations in the early 2030s.


Offline Norm38

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1696
  • Liked: 1272
  • Likes Given: 2316
Re: Interlune moon start-up to harvest moon resources
« Reply #4 on: 02/07/2024 09:03 pm »
https://techcrunch.com/2024/02/07/ex-blue-origin-leaders-secretive-lunar-startup-interlune-has-moonshot-mining-plans/

Quote
Interlune predicts an “exponential” rise demand for He-3 in the coming years, driven by areas like quantum computing, medical imaging, in-space propellant and fusion, to the extent that it projects an annual demand of 4,000 kilograms by 2040 (versus just 5 kilograms now).

Looks like I have some reading to do.  D-He3 fusion is sought after because theoretically there are no free neutrons.  But chemically isn't He3 the same as He4?  What is otherwise unique about it?
And wouldn't it be an expensive waste as a propellant when argon is so cheap and plentiful?  Isn't SpaceX planning to switch Starlink thrusters over to Argon?

Offline Tywin

Re: Interlune moon start-up to harvest moon resources
« Reply #5 on: 02/07/2024 09:59 pm »
Maybe Jeff Bezos, is follow this company, for the future of the Cislunar economy...
The knowledge is power...Everything is connected...
The Turtle continues at a steady pace ...

Offline Lampyridae

  • Veteran
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2634
  • South Africa
  • Liked: 946
  • Likes Given: 2041
Re: Interlune moon start-up to harvest moon resources
« Reply #6 on: 02/08/2024 11:55 am »
https://techcrunch.com/2024/02/07/ex-blue-origin-leaders-secretive-lunar-startup-interlune-has-moonshot-mining-plans/

Quote
Interlune predicts an “exponential” rise demand for He-3 in the coming years, driven by areas like quantum computing, medical imaging, in-space propellant and fusion, to the extent that it projects an annual demand of 4,000 kilograms by 2040 (versus just 5 kilograms now).

Looks like I have some reading to do.  D-He3 fusion is sought after because theoretically there are no free neutrons.  But chemically isn't He3 the same as He4?  What is otherwise unique about it?
And wouldn't it be an expensive waste as a propellant when argon is so cheap and plentiful?  Isn't SpaceX planning to switch Starlink thrusters over to Argon?

D-He3 means less neutron shielding for the fusion reactor's superconducting magnets, drastically reducing their mass (and in theory, cost). Neutrons are also worthless for thrust in a fusion engine. Balanced against this is a much higher ignition temperature... I've read somewhere that mining lunar regolith for He3 equates to the same amount of energy per kg as coal.

He3 has an excellent neutron capture cross-section, and it has some funky properties at cryogenic temperatures. One of its properties is as a inhalation gas for MRI of the lungs.

Tags:
 

Advertisement NovaTech
Advertisement Northrop Grumman
Advertisement
Advertisement Margaritaville Beach Resort South Padre Island
Advertisement Brady Kenniston
Advertisement NextSpaceflight
Advertisement Nathan Barker Photography
1