Author Topic: SaxaVord Spaceport  (Read 9143 times)

Offline microbrew

  • Member
  • Posts: 5
  • Liked: 0
  • Likes Given: 0
Re: SaxaVord Spaceport
« Reply #20 on: 11/14/2023 06:36 pm »
https://twitter.com/jeff_foust/status/1724438977749372965

Quote from: Jeff Foust
Alan Thompson of Skyrora says at Space Tech Expo Europe that they hope to get a UK CAA license by the spring of 2024 for a second suborbital test flight, this time from SaxaVord. (The first launch last year from Iceland was… less than successful.)

The stakes in SaxaVord are too high for a failure, too many parties need or want it. Including the UK Space Agency, right? This will work out in some way.

It's possible neither of these sub-orbital launchers requires a full UK Space Industyr Act launch license. Sub-orbital can be launched under the CAA Air Navigation Order rules in most circumstances. Still ran by the CAA but much less stringent.

Saxo probably doesn't need a spaceport license for that to happen either, altogh it will be heralded as the Second Coming of Christ no doubt. Meanwhile good old Benbecula in the W. Isles has been doing sub-orbital dfor decades.

More interesting IMHO is the race for proper orbital. There's only three players at th front of that rcae today; RFA, Isar and Orbex.

Offline microbrew

  • Member
  • Posts: 5
  • Liked: 0
  • Likes Given: 0
Re: SaxaVord Spaceport
« Reply #21 on: 11/20/2023 10:00 am »
https://www.dailyrecord.co.uk/news/scottish-news/work-shetland-space-port-grinds-31473181

Work at taxpayer funded Scots space port grinds to halt as bills go unpaid.

The site in Shetland owes around £1m to a contractor and a rocket launch has been cancelled.

Construction of Scotland’s new taxpayer-subsidised space port on Shetland has ground to a halt with contractors unpaid and a rocket launch cancelled.

MPs were told earlier this year by Frank Strang, the chief executive of the site’s owners, SaxaVord, how he had secured a £139million debt facility and hoped to launch test flights into orbit within months.

But we can reveal a construction company involved in the project has been left around £1million out of pocket with work now at a virtual standstill.

Shetland-based DITT declined to comment but sources have confirmed its bills have not been paid.

A source said: “This is a huge construction project and you need to have the money to complete it.

“No doubt the space centre could be a success but it is not guaranteed and investors clearly aren’t lining up to put money in.

“DITT’s bills stopped being paid and so the company had no choice but to stop work until things are resolved. It would be great to see rockets blasting off into outer space from Shetland, but at the moment it seems more pie in the sky.”

Building work began in March 2022 with more than 60 workers on site, but by August few remained with Strang claiming contractors were being given “time off because the project was so far ahead of schedule”.

Danish billionaire Anders Polvson has invested in the project and in December 2022 it emerged SaxaVord had won £378,000 funding from the UK Space Agency.

In May this year Strang told the Science, Innovation, and Technology Committee that he had secured a £139million debt facility “from the markets”.

German rocket firm HyImpulse Technologies has signed a letter of intent to conduct orbital flights from SaxaVord and has insisted it remains committed to the site. However it has been forced to move the maiden flight of its suborbital SR75 rocket from Shetland to Australia.

A spokesman for SaxaVord said: “We do not comment on contractual matters. The overall project is firmly on track.

“SaxaVord continues to have excellent dialogue with the authorities and is fully expecting to receive its spaceport licence very soon from the Civil Aviation Authority. We are looking forward to hosting vertical rocket launches in the coming months.”

Meanwhile reviews on travel website Trip Advisor suggest tourists have been left puzzled by the lack of activity on what was expected to be a NASA style site.

One traveller from Dallas, Texas, posted in May 2022: “No fence, gate or warning notices so we drove in to look at a bunch of derelict ex military buildings that were almost falling down. If this really is the future UK space site, then they need to get their act together.

Another post in May 2023, said: “Finding the port was not easy but having found it there was nothing there to see."

In 2019 we revealed Strang transferred a £610,000 public loan to another of his firms before it was liquidated.

The former RAF officer’s Shetland FM, which managed accommodation for offshore workers, collapsed with a huge sum outstanding to government quango Highlands and Islands Enterprises. Accounts for Shetland FM showed it transferred the six-figure loan to another of Strang’s companies, Saxa Vord Limited, in July 2017.

We also revealed how a major former investor in the space port, Michael Haston had previously been accused of fraud. He went to court in a failed attempt to stop the Sunday Mail revealing his past and has now been banned from being a company director.

The SaxaVord space site has cut all ties with the businessman after we revealed details of his chequered dealings.

Dozens of people lost millions after investing in a finance company run by Haston, who also goes by the name Michael McQueen.

--

Tabloid hyperbole aside, not exactly great news...

Online DJPledger

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 807
  • Liked: 505
  • Likes Given: 33459
Re: SaxaVord Spaceport
« Reply #22 on: 11/20/2023 11:13 am »
Goes to show there is no future in small LV's since they can't compete in price per unit mass to orbit with larger LV's and F9 rideshare taking away most of the smallsat launch market. Once SS achieves IOC then it is game over for small LV's.

SaxaVord Spaceport with either get abandoned or be upgraded to take at least MLV's.

Offline trimeta

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1665
  • Kansas City, MO
  • Liked: 2123
  • Likes Given: 57
Re: SaxaVord Spaceport
« Reply #23 on: 11/20/2023 07:51 pm »
Goes to show there is no future in small LV's since they can't compete in price per unit mass to orbit with larger LV's and F9 rideshare taking away most of the smallsat launch market. Once SS achieves IOC then it is game over for small LV's.

SaxaVord Spaceport with either get abandoned or be upgraded to take at least MLV's.
Going from "one financially-shaky commercial multi-tenant launch site is having further funding issues" to "and therefore small launch vehicles are a failure, full stop" is quite a take. Especially when there are apparently no examples of a successful commercial multi-tenant orbital launch site. Perhaps it's that part which is a problem. Or something specific to SaxaVord.

Online jstrotha0975

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 564
  • United States
  • Liked: 330
  • Likes Given: 2597
Re: SaxaVord Spaceport
« Reply #24 on: 11/20/2023 08:38 pm »
Why did England spend money and resources on 3 launch sites when they should concentrate on one launch site at a time?

Offline trimeta

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1665
  • Kansas City, MO
  • Liked: 2123
  • Likes Given: 57
Re: SaxaVord Spaceport
« Reply #25 on: 11/20/2023 11:26 pm »
Why did England spend money and resources on 3 launch sites when they should concentrate on one launch site at a time?
Calling Cornwall a "launch site" is probably being generous...I'm not sure how much of the "development" there was basically working out the regulatory procedures for launch in general, which would transfer to any other launch sites mostly verbatim.

Online AnalogMan

  • Member
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3428
  • Cambridge, UK
  • Liked: 1595
  • Likes Given: 50
Re: SaxaVord Spaceport
« Reply #26 on: 12/17/2023 12:14 pm »
SaxaVord granted spaceport licence by UK Civil Aviation Authority
December 17, 2023

https://www.caa.co.uk/newsroom/news/saxavord-granted-spaceport-licence-by-uk-civil-aviation-authority/

At a glance

    • SaxaVord has become the UK’s first licensed vertical launch spaceport.
    • New spaceport licence from the UK Civil Aviation Authority paves the way for rocket launches on UK soil from 2024.
    • The licence was granted following rigorous safety, security, and environmental assessment by the UK’s space regulator.

The UK officially has a brand-new spaceport following SaxaVord, on the North Coast of the Shetland Islands, receiving a licence from the UK Civil Aviation Authority

The licence marks several firsts for the UK’s growing space sector including being the first-ever vertical spaceport on UK soil. The spaceport is also the first fully licensed vertical spaceport in Western Europe.

SaxaVord has been assessed by the space regulator to verify that appropriate safety, security, and environmental criteria are met to operate a spaceport, and that it has the suitable infrastructure, equipment, and services to accommodate vertical space launches.

The spaceport licence puts Scotland at the forefront of the European launch market, with Scottish satellites already in space, and home-grown rocket companies breaking new ground. There are a number of launch operators from around the world currently developing rockets to launch from SaxaVord who are currently at various stages of the assessment process with the Civil Aviation Authority.
[…]

Also:

Shetland is first UK spaceport for vertical rocket launches
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-north-east-orkney-shetland-67741864

Spaceport Licence attached.
« Last Edit: 12/17/2023 12:21 pm by AnalogMan »

Online starbase

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 370
  • Liked: 325
  • Likes Given: 93
Re: SaxaVord Spaceport
« Reply #27 on: 12/17/2023 02:00 pm »
Quote from: AnalogMan

Also:

Shetland is first UK spaceport for vertical rocket launches
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-north-east-orkney-shetland-67741864

Spaceport Licence attached.

The BBC article contains this part:

"Full orbital launches are expected to take place at SaxaVord from 2025."
bit.ly/SpaceLaunchCalendar ☆ bit.ly/SpaceEventCalendar

Online FutureSpaceTourist

  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 47445
  • UK
    • Plan 28
  • Liked: 80295
  • Likes Given: 36334
Re: SaxaVord Spaceport
« Reply #28 on: 12/17/2023 02:17 pm »
https://twitter.com/saxavord_space/status/1736393982811181084

Quote
We are absolutely thrilled to have been awarded our spaceport licence by the UK Civil Aviation Authority. Read on 👇for all the details.

https://saxavord.com/saxavord-granted-spaceport-licence-by-civil-aviation-authority/

Quote
SaxaVord granted spaceport licence by Civil Aviation Authority
December 17, 2023
General, News

A significant historic milestone has been achieved by SaxaVord Spaceport with the award of a licence by the Civil Aviation Authority.

It becomes the first licensed vertical launch spaceport in the UK and Western Europe following extensive assessment by the space regulator to check that appropriate safety, security and environmental criteria are met, and that SaxaVord has suitable infrastructure, equipment and services to accommodate vertical space launches.

CEO Frank Strang said: “The award of our spaceport licence is both historic for Shetland, Scotland and the UK and places us firmly at the leading edge of the European and global space economy.

“As importantly for me it is also a fantastic achievement by our Operations and Licencing Team led by Scott Hammond who have been working tirelessly alongside the CAA for almost three years to secure this award.

“Our team is very proud that the Government has entrusted us with operating a complex, multi-disciplinary and multi-launch spaceport and we all take this responsibility very seriously.

“There is much to do still but this is a fantastic way to end the year and head into Christmas.”

SaxaVord has a roster of clients including Rocket Factory Augsburg, HyImpulse, Lockheed Martin/ABL Systems and Skyrora.

The spaceport licence puts Scotland at the forefront of the European launch market, with Scottish satellites already in space, and home-grown rocket companies breaking new ground.

There are a number of launch operators from around the world currently developing rockets to launch from SaxaVord who are currently at various stages of the assessment process with the Civil Aviation Authority.

The not-too-distant future could see Scottish built rockets launching Scottish satellites from a Scottish spaceport. The licence permits SaxaVord to host up to 30 launches a year, allowing the spaceport to grow as the UK space sector continues to expand.

Tim Johnson, Director of Space Regulation at the UK Civil Aviation Authority, said: “Granting SaxaVord their licence is an era defining moment for the UK space sector.

“This marks the beginning of a new chapter for UK space as rockets may soon launch satellites into orbit from Scotland.

“We are undertaking vital work to make sure the UK’s space activities are safe and sustainable for all.”

Now that it is licensed SaxaVord will be subject to an ongoing monitoring programme by the UK Civil Aviation Authority to ensure safety is maintained and the terms of its licence are not breached. 

This latest licence is the 352nd space activity approved by the UK Civil Aviation Authority since becoming the UK’s space regulator in July 2021. The regulator now monitors more than 750 different satellites, has licensed two spaceports, a launch from Cornwall, and the OneWeb constellation which is the second biggest satellite constellation in orbit.

Transport Secretary Mark Harper said: “The United Kingdom’s space industry is growing, with SaxaVord set for lift off to become this country’s first vertical spaceport.

“Today’s historic announcement will boost Shetland’s economy and put the United Kingdom at the forefront of spaceflight innovation.”

This activity is supporting an ever-growing space industry estimated to be worth £17.5 billion and support 48,800 jobs, with over 2200 space companies based in the UK. The UK space sector is a rapidly expanding and vital part of the UK economy.

The licence also follows last week’s announcement of £3.4 million UK Space Agency funding for HyImpulse UK, a Shetland based launch company to undertake their Hybrid Propulsion Test Programme ahead of the proposed launch of their launch vehicle, named SL1, from SaxaVord Spaceport in Unst.

Matt Archer, Director of Launch, UK Space Agency said: “The granting of SaxaVord’s spaceport licence by the UK Civil Aviation Authority is a hugely exciting milestone as we look forward to the first vertical launches from UK soil in the coming year.

“Getting to this stage is testament to the hard work by SaxaVord Spaceport and partners across government which moves us towards realising our ambitions for the UK to be the leading provider of small satellite launch in Europe by 2030.

“Establishing orbital launch capabilities in the UK is already bringing new jobs and investment opportunities to local communities as well as inspiring the next generation to join our growing space sector.”

Scottish Innovation Minister Richard Lochhead MSP said: “This milestone heralds a new era for space in Scotland. As the UK’s first licensed vertical spaceport, SaxaVord and Scotland can soon be a gateway to space, deploying cutting edge small satellites into orbit for international and domestic customers alike. 

“Space continues to be a great opportunity for Scotland; including for our economic development, the key role it plays in helping us fight the climate crisis and the power it has to inspire discovery and innovation in the next generation.

“The Scottish Government’s aim for Scotland to become a multi-billion pound industry and Europe’s leading space nation has taken a significant step towards becoming a reality. We will continue to build on our strengths that include an innovative and diverse engineering base and world-class companies competing in international markets.”

SaxaVord is also establishing the Space Environment Climate Control Centre to drive a responsible attitude to climate and the environment. Known as SaxaZero, it will monitor the spaceport’s impact on the natural environment as well as push for innovation in space industry sustainability. SaxaZero will also promote the use of satellite data in conservation and by companies seeking to understand their impact on nature and lower costs and emissions.
« Last Edit: 12/17/2023 02:17 pm by FutureSpaceTourist »

Offline PM3

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1469
  • Germany
  • Liked: 1827
  • Likes Given: 1287
Re: SaxaVord Spaceport
« Reply #29 on: 12/17/2023 02:55 pm »
The BBC article contains this part:

"Full orbital launches are expected to take place at SaxaVord from 2025."

What is a "full orbital launch", compared to a nonfull orbital launch? RFA's aspirational plan is two sponsored demo launches from SaxaVord in 2024, then paying customers' payloads from 2025. So I assume the latter are those "full" launches?
"Never, never be afraid of the truth." -- Jim Bridenstine

Offline Euromir

  • Member
  • Posts: 1
  • UK
  • Liked: 2
  • Likes Given: 0
Re: SaxaVord Spaceport
« Reply #30 on: 12/17/2023 07:47 pm »
Hope they allow viewing from public maybe, cant ever get to the USA, so maybe just maybe can drive to Shetlands..
« Last Edit: 12/17/2023 07:47 pm by Euromir »

Offline catdlr

  • Member
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 10747
  • Enthusiast since the Redstones
  • Marina del Rey, California, USA
  • Liked: 8102
  • Likes Given: 7411
Re: SaxaVord Spaceport
« Reply #31 on: 12/17/2023 10:00 pm »
I'm so happy for this,  good luck to them

Tony De La Rosa, ...I'm no Feline Dealer!! I move mountains.  but I'm better known for "I think it's highly sexual." Japanese to English Translation.

Offline Craigles

Re: SaxaVord Spaceport
« Reply #32 on: 12/17/2023 11:15 pm »
Hope they allow viewing from public maybe, cant ever get to the USA, so maybe just maybe can drive to Shetlands..
That is essentially correct; you can drive to the Shetland Islands. Northlink Ferries has overnight service to get you from Aberdeen Scotland to Shetland Island, 7 nights a week. From Shetland Island, the Toft-Ulsta Ferry and the Gutcher-Belmont Ferry can move your car short distances to the northern tip of the Shetland Islands where you will find Saxavord.

Bon Voyage!  ;) You have great plans for a vacation there.
I'd rather be here now

Offline Asteroza

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2807
  • Liked: 1062
  • Likes Given: 32
Re: SaxaVord Spaceport
« Reply #33 on: 12/18/2023 12:50 am »
The BBC article contains this part:

"Full orbital launches are expected to take place at SaxaVord from 2025."

What is a "full orbital launch", compared to a nonfull orbital launch? RFA's aspirational plan is two sponsored demo launches from SaxaVord in 2024, then paying customers' payloads from 2025. So I assume the latter are those "full" launches?

Well we can do the no true scotsman full orbital launches meme, but SaxaVord is technically part of Scotland so...

Offline Phil Stooke

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1346
  • Canada
  • Liked: 1413
  • Likes Given: 1
Re: SaxaVord Spaceport
« Reply #34 on: 12/18/2023 10:28 pm »
"What is a "full orbital launch", compared to a nonfull orbital launch?"

The word suborbital springs to mind.  Full orbital isn't suborbital.

Offline PM3

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1469
  • Germany
  • Liked: 1827
  • Likes Given: 1287
Re: SaxaVord Spaceport
« Reply #35 on: 12/19/2023 07:44 am »
"What is a "full orbital launch", compared to a nonfull orbital launch?"

The word suborbital springs to mind.  Full orbital isn't suborbital.

Then BBC just said that neither RFA nor ABL will launch from SaxaVord in 2024. Because those will definitely be orbital launch attempts. Very unusual that a news outlet trashes launch schedules this way, without any hint that and why they are doing so.

Possible explanations:

- BBC actually has a well informed source which told them that there will be no orbital launches from SaxaVord in 2024, but was not aware what this means (that it is important news, as it means that RFA and everybody else are publishing nonsense schedules).

- They actually meant "commercial orbital launches".

- They thought that the RFA demo launches announced for 2024 are not "full" in some way because they are "demo".

- Somone confused 2024 with 2025.

- Someone did a pessimistic estimate because he doesn't like the idea that the first successful orbital launch from British soil could be a German rocket.

I think it is both the second and third one. News author did not have full understanding of launch business and orbital mechanics, which resulted in some nonfull news gibberish. (Though the assumption of a first orbital launch from SaxaVord in 2025 is reasonable because of aspirational schedules. But this conclusion needs lots of understanding of rocket business, and some explanation instead of just dropping a date.)
"Never, never be afraid of the truth." -- Jim Bridenstine

Offline litton4

  • Member
  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 596
  • Liked: 390
  • Likes Given: 148
Re: SaxaVord Spaceport
« Reply #36 on: 12/19/2023 10:03 am »
Hope they allow viewing from public maybe, cant ever get to the USA, so maybe just maybe can drive to Shetlands..
That is essentially correct; you can drive to the Shetland Islands. Northlink Ferries has overnight service to get you from Aberdeen Scotland to Shetland Island, 7 nights a week. From Shetland Island, the Toft-Ulsta Ferry and the Gutcher-Belmont Ferry can move your car short distances to the northern tip of the Shetland Islands where you will find Saxavord.

Bon Voyage!  ;) You have great plans for a vacation there.

They also have a Gin and Whisky distillery there.....after our visit/tour, we were followed by a police car back across two ferries before they finally turned off, just watching the Lotus, I guess  ;D
« Last Edit: 12/19/2023 10:05 am by litton4 »
Dave Condliffe

Online AnalogMan

  • Member
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3428
  • Cambridge, UK
  • Liked: 1595
  • Likes Given: 50
Re: SaxaVord Spaceport
« Reply #37 on: 12/19/2023 12:15 pm »
"What is a "full orbital launch", compared to a nonfull orbital launch?"

The word suborbital springs to mind.  Full orbital isn't suborbital.

Then BBC just said that neither RFA nor ABL will launch from SaxaVord in 2024. Because those will definitely be orbital launch attempts. Very unusual that a news outlet trashes launch schedules this way, without any hint that and why they are doing so.

[…]

I believe the 2025 reference for orbital launches refers only to HyImpulse (who made an announcement jointly with SaxaVord about their future plans back in November - https://saxavord.com/saxavord-and-hyimpulse-announce-launch-plans ).

The BBC have this annoying habit of making every sentence a new paragraph, breaking apart comments related to the same idea or thought or fact.

The BBC previously referred to 2024 orbital launches by RFA and Lockheed/ABL in an article posted on November 15, 2023:

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-north-east-orkney-shetland-67426303

"Another German company, Rocket Factory Ausburg (RFA), is also planning an orbital launch early next year, followed by a Lockheed Martin/ABL Space Systems launch later in 2024."

Offline ringsider

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 712
  • Liked: 504
  • Likes Given: 96
Re: SaxaVord Spaceport
« Reply #38 on: 12/22/2023 02:33 pm »
"What is a "full orbital launch", compared to a nonfull orbital launch?"

The word suborbital springs to mind.  Full orbital isn't suborbital.

Then BBC just said that neither RFA nor ABL will launch from SaxaVord in 2024. Because those will definitely be orbital launch attempts. Very unusual that a news outlet trashes launch schedules this way, without any hint that and why they are doing so.

Possible explanations:

- BBC actually has a well informed source which told them that there will be no orbital launches from SaxaVord in 2024, but was not aware what this means (that it is important news, as it means that RFA and everybody else are publishing nonsense schedules).

- They actually meant "commercial orbital launches".

- They thought that the RFA demo launches announced for 2024 are not "full" in some way because they are "demo".

- Somone confused 2024 with 2025.

- Someone did a pessimistic estimate because he doesn't like the idea that the first successful orbital launch from British soil could be a German rocket.

I think it is both the second and third one. News author did not have full understanding of launch business and orbital mechanics, which resulted in some nonfull news gibberish. (Though the assumption of a first orbital launch from SaxaVord in 2025 is reasonable because of aspirational schedules. But this conclusion needs lots of understanding of rocket business, and some explanation instead of just dropping a date.)

There is no way ABL launches overseas before it has success here in the USA. Minimum 3 launch attempts and 9-12 months in between each attempt, depending on how successful they are, pushes them into 2025 at the earliest.

RFA was founded in May 2018. They are 5.5 years into their R&D, and while they have some money it's still not enough. There is no way they are launching in 2024, maybe not even in 2025.

As for Saxavord Spaceport, they have a piece of paper that says they are a licensed spaceport, but don't have about 50 million pieces of green paper to allow them to build out the infrastructure.

You would have to guess late 2025, early 2026 for orbital.

Sub-orbital will depend on Hyimpulse and Skyrora. Hyimpulse is off to Australia and won't want to be distracted by Saxavord in 2024. No idea about Skyrora.

Nobody else is ready or motivated to go there; PLD will stick to Spain. They are about to win €43m from the Spanish Govt. OrbEx are well funded but focused on vertical integration.

It's hard to see how the Saxavord business plan makes any sense. Would you invest?
« Last Edit: 12/22/2023 02:39 pm by ringsider »

Offline PM3

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1469
  • Germany
  • Liked: 1827
  • Likes Given: 1287
Re: SaxaVord Spaceport
« Reply #39 on: 12/22/2023 08:38 pm »
It's hard to see how the Saxavord business plan makes any sense. Would you invest?

I would not have invested into OneWeb - but it did survive, because it was strategically too important to fail. Now let's see what will happen to the most promising spaceport project in the UK ...

Orbex doesn't have the money to build Sutherland spaceport and the rocket. They had management issues, are slow in progress and not strategically important. High risk of failure there, which would leave SaxaVord as the UK's only option for a domestic rocket launch site. (With the alternative of Astraius launching via Cornwall to make the UK a spacefaring nation.)

Generally, I often see you argumenting by current money reserves. Who currently has lots of money will prevail, who has little will fail. This is too one-dimensional IMHO. There are other deciding factors like management quality, cash burn rate, long-term prospect and - as mentioned above - strategic importance., which will decide about future money inflow.

Here in Germany, there are two rocket startups that look well-managed (RFA and HyImpulse) and one that does not (Isar). Exactly the first two chose SaxaVord for orbital launches. That's a relevant hint. I think the people at RFA and HyImpulse have a good insight into the spaceport projects; they are too smart for chosing a dead cat.
"Never, never be afraid of the truth." -- Jim Bridenstine

Tags:
 

Advertisement NovaTech
Advertisement Northrop Grumman
Advertisement
Advertisement Margaritaville Beach Resort South Padre Island
Advertisement Brady Kenniston
Advertisement NextSpaceflight
Advertisement Nathan Barker Photography
0