Author Topic: Artemis II (EM-2) UPDATES [Weisman, Glover, Hansen, Koch] - late November 2024  (Read 65358 times)

Offline catdlr

  • Member
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 10705
  • Enthusiast since the Redstones
  • Marina del Rey, California, USA
  • Liked: 8047
  • Likes Given: 7393
Tony De La Rosa, ...I'm no Feline Dealer!! I move mountains.  but I'm better known for "I think it's highly sexual." Japanese to English Translation.

Online FutureSpaceTourist

  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 47390
  • UK
    • Plan 28
  • Liked: 80236
  • Likes Given: 36319
https://twitter.com/nasaspaceflight/status/1711813390018978298

Quote
The second Core Stage for SLS, set to launch the first crew on Artemis II, is now scheduled to be ready for shipping by mid-December.

NSF's Philip Sloss spoke with Jonathan Looser, NASA SLS Core Stage Design Team Lead, on the latest status:

https://www.nasaspaceflight.com/2023/10/aii-core-weld-issues/

Offline mainengine

  • Regular
  • Full Member
  • *
  • Posts: 191
  • Liked: 7
  • Likes Given: 1
Latest status of where things stand for Artemis II:

https://twitter.com/genejm29/status/1658123935240667138
Schedule estimates from second attached slide:
- All Artemis II hardware complete and ready for delivery within 2023, with positive margins.- CM about to undergo final installations.- SM in integrated testing (with CMA attached).
- CS-2 engined next month, completed a couple of months after that (complete by early Fall).- ICPS at the Cape, but in ULA facilities for now for testing.- LVSA ready for delivery.
- SRMs awaiting action in Utah.- ML-1 on track to support current Artemis II launch date, including crew mods to pad.

I miss the installation date for the RS-25 engines in these milestone pictures

Offline eeergo

Latest status of where things stand for Artemis II:

https://twitter.com/genejm29/status/1658123935240667138
Schedule estimates from second attached slide:
- All Artemis II hardware complete and ready for delivery within 2023, with positive margins.- CM about to undergo final installations.- SM in integrated testing (with CMA attached).
- CS-2 engined next month, completed a couple of months after that (complete by early Fall).- ICPS at the Cape, but in ULA facilities for now for testing.- LVSA ready for delivery.
- SRMs awaiting action in Utah.- ML-1 on track to support current Artemis II launch date, including crew mods to pad.

I miss the installation date for the RS-25 engines in these milestone pictures


You can find them in Phil's article (all dates September):

- E2059: 11th
- E2047: 15th
- E2062: 19th
- E2063: 20th

This was soft mate. All engines were "expected to be hard-mated by the end of [last] week", i.e. by October 8th.
« Last Edit: 10/12/2023 05:38 am by eeergo »
-DaviD-

Online FutureSpaceTourist

  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 47390
  • UK
    • Plan 28
  • Liked: 80236
  • Likes Given: 36319
https://flic.kr/p/2p9qKQG

Quote
NASA Prepares Artemis II Moon Rocket Core Stage for Final Assembly Phase

NASA and industry partners Aerojet Rocketdyne and Boeing have installed all four RS-25 engines onto the SLS (Space Launch System) rocket core stage for the agency’s Artemis II mission, signaling the core stage is nearing completion. Once complete, the core stage will be shipped to NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. During launch, the rocket’s engines provide more than two million pounds of combined thrust.
 
Image credit: NASA/Danny Nowlin

Offline cplchanb

  • Full Member
  • *
  • Posts: 165
  • Toronto
  • Liked: 103
  • Likes Given: 32
Welding problems have popped up for the LOX tank.... I thought they had gotten a handle over these issues...
then again its Boeing we're talking about... :-\


https://www.space.com/artemis-2-moon-rocket-space-launch-system-welding-issues-report



Offline pochimax

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 306
  • spain
  • Liked: 147
  • Likes Given: 80
Welding problems have popped up for the LOX tank.... I thought they had gotten a handle over these issues...
then again its Boeing we're talking about... :-\


https://www.space.com/artemis-2-moon-rocket-space-launch-system-welding-issues-report

https://www.nasaspaceflight.com/2023/10/aii-core-weld-issues/

Completion and delivery of Core Stage-2 was delayed from early in 2023 due to supply chain issues and core stage prime contractor Boeing is also dealing with a new weld tool issue at MAF that has delayed completion of the liquid oxygen (LOX) tank for the subsequent unit, Core Stage-3.

 ;)

Online FutureSpaceTourist

  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 47390
  • UK
    • Plan 28
  • Liked: 80236
  • Likes Given: 36319
https://twitter.com/nasaspaceflight/status/1718375584017854502

Quote
SLS Core Stage prime contractor Boeing is back to two shifts a day at the Michoud Assembly Facility (MAF) to complete the Core Stage for Artemis II by the end of the year.

Philip Sloss visited MAF to sit down with officials to gain info on the latest.

https://www.nasaspaceflight.com/2023/10/a-ii-core-stage/

Offline Orbiter

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2994
  • Florida
  • Liked: 1548
  • Likes Given: 1384
KSC Engineer, astronomer, rocket photographer.

Online FutureSpaceTourist

  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 47390
  • UK
    • Plan 28
  • Liked: 80236
  • Likes Given: 36319
https://twitter.com/nasa_sls/status/1723732675683348685

Quote
Take a look at @NASAGroundSys' first look of the SLS booster processing for #Artemis II.

The left and right aft motor segments are mated to the aft skirts which will be followed by the installation of the aft exit cones. Next, they will be moved for assembly.

Online FutureSpaceTourist

  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 47390
  • UK
    • Plan 28
  • Liked: 80236
  • Likes Given: 36319
https://twitter.com/nasa_sls/status/1724548161442636158

Quote
The SLS rocket for #Artemis II has reached several milestones recently including the installation of all four RS-25 engines onto the core stage last month.

Watch as technicians at NASA's Michoud Assembly Facility install the engines:

Edit to add: the video attached to the tweet is also posted by NASA at:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/nasamarshall/53332146961/

Quote
Watch Crews Add RS-25 Engines to NASA Artemis II SLS Rocket

Artemis II reached a significant milestone as teams fully installed all four RS-25 engines to the 212-foot-tall core stage for NASA’s SLS (Space Launch System) rocket at NASA’s Michoud Assembly Facility in New Orleans. During Artemis II, the four engines, arranged like legs on a chair at the bottom of the mega rocket, will fire for eight minutes at launch, producing more than 2 million pounds of thrust to send the Artemis II crew around the Moon. Boeing is the lead contractor for the SLS core stage. Aerojet Rocketdyne, an L3Harris Technologies company, is the lead contractor for the SLS engines. NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, manages the SLS Program and Michoud.
 
Image credit: NASA
« Last Edit: 11/14/2023 09:09 pm by FutureSpaceTourist »

Offline catdlr

  • Member
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 10705
  • Enthusiast since the Redstones
  • Marina del Rey, California, USA
  • Liked: 8047
  • Likes Given: 7393
NASA Artemis 2 moon rocket's core stage engines installed in 4K time-lapse

Quote
Nov 14, 2023
Artemis 2's Space Launch System rocket core stage was fitted with 4 RS-25 engines recently at NASA’s Michoud Assembly Facility in New Orleans.

Footage courtesy: NASA/Evan Deroche/Steven Seipel/Eric Bordelon

Tony De La Rosa, ...I'm no Feline Dealer!! I move mountains.  but I'm better known for "I think it's highly sexual." Japanese to English Translation.

Online FutureSpaceTourist

  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 47390
  • UK
    • Plan 28
  • Liked: 80236
  • Likes Given: 36319
https://flic.kr/p/2pgfqQx

Quote
Artemis II Astronauts View SLS Core Stage at Michoud
Artemis II NASA astronauts Reid Wiseman and Christina Koch of NASA, and CSA (Canadian Space Agency) astronaut Jeremy Hansen view the core stage for the SLS (Space Launch System) rocket at the agency’s Michoud Assembly Facility in New Orleans on Nov. 16. The three astronauts, along with NASA’s Victor Glover, will launch atop the rocket stage to venture around the Moon on Artemis II, the first crewed flight for Artemis.
 
The core stage, towering 212 feet, is the backbone of the SLS mega rocket and serves to support the weight of the payload, upper stage, and the crew inside the Orion Spacecraft. It also includes two massive propellant tanks that collectively hold 733,000 gallons of propellant to help power the stage's four RS-25 engines.
 
The astronauts’ visit to Michoud coincided with the first anniversary of the launch of Artemis I. The uncrewed flight test of SLS and Orion was the first in a series of increasingly complex missions for Artemis as the agency works to return humans to the lunar surface and develop a long-term presence there for discovery and exploration.
 
Image credits: NASA/Michael DeMocker

Online ddspaceman

Jeremy R. Hansen
@Astro_Jeremy
An enjoyable opportunity to share more about the #ArtemisII mission with @Telegraph here in London. @AstroVicGlover and I discussed the international collaboration that is making #Artemis possible.

We also discussed how the solutions we aim to create for sustainable deep-space exploration overlap with the challenges humanity is facing on the planet.

https://twitter.com/Astro_Jeremy/status/1732099272059875824


Online FutureSpaceTourist

  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 47390
  • UK
    • Plan 28
  • Liked: 80236
  • Likes Given: 36319
First attached photo:

https://flic.kr/p/2pkceiz

Quote
NASA Kennedy
KSC-20231128-PH-KLS01_0061


Engineers and technicians process the right forward center segment of the Space Launch System solid rocket boosters for the Artemis II mission inside the Rotation, Processing and Surge Facility (RPSF) at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida on Tuesday, Nov. 28, 2023. The team has been examining the 10 booster segments one-by-one then lifting them to make sure they are ready for integration and launch before moving them to the Vehicle Assembly Building for stacking atop the mobile launcher. Artemis II astronauts Reid Wiseman, Victor Glover, Christina Koch, and Jeremy Hansen will blast off from Kennedy and travel around the moon for the agency's first crewed mission under Artemis that will test all of the Orion spacecraft's systems. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett
« Last Edit: 12/07/2023 06:48 pm by FutureSpaceTourist »

Online ddspaceman

Dr. Jenni Gibbons
@Astro_Jenni
I’ve spent the last few days learning about the Orion capsule by training in the Orion mockup in NASA’s Space Vehicle Mockup Facility.

Jason is sitting next to me “playing” crew – he’s a friend and teammate whom I met years ago when I was International Space Station Lead Capcom for Expedition 63 and he was the Onboard Support Officer (OSO) for the same expedition.

Years later, I’m working on Artemis II as a backup crewmember while he is the Intravehicular Activity (IVA) Lead for the same mission. In other words, his focus is on the crew living, working, and surviving in spacecraft.

Cool to see our paths cross again years after working together to support the Space Station. Just one of the many folks on the ground who keep our space program moving!

https://twitter.com/Astro_Jenni/status/1732495929771528415

https://twitter.com/Astro_Jenni/status/1732495936859914409


Online ddspaceman

Dr. Jenni Gibbons
@Astro_Jenni
That fresh-out-of-the-capsule feeling! I had a great time during my recent Orion egress training, as you can probably tell from this photo.

During these events, we practice getting out of the capsule as if we had just splashed down in the Pacific Ocean and need to get ourselves outside for any reason.

In this case, I’ve just egressed our Orion mockup through the docking hatch and am ready to slide down the side of the capsule into a life raft.

Part of our training on the ground involves every scenario to prepare for flight, from the nominal and expected to any other event that can occur from launch to splashdown and recovery.

https://twitter.com/Astro_Jenni/status/1733218138496381248

https://twitter.com/Astro_Jenni/status/1733218143831568407

Online FutureSpaceTourist

  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 47390
  • UK
    • Plan 28
  • Liked: 80236
  • Likes Given: 36319
https://twitter.com/nasa_sls/status/1734313671952638449

Quote
The Orion stage adapter has been flipped at @NASA_Marshall. Once attached to the diaphragm, it will act as a barrier to prevent gases during #Artemis II launch from entering @NASA_Orion. This is one of the last steps before delivery to @NASAKennedy. MORE:

https://www.nasa.gov/image-article/nasa-teams-prepare-moon-rocket-to-spacecraft-connector-for-assembly/

Quote
NASA Teams Prepare Moon Rocket-to-Spacecraft Connector for Assembly

Beth Ridgeway
Lee Mohon

DEC 11, 2023

The elements of the super-heavy lift SLS (Space Launch System) rocket for NASA’s Artemis II mission are undergoing final preparations before shipment to NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida for stacking and pre-launch activities in 2024.

Teams at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, recently rotated the Orion stage adapter– a ring structure that connects NASA’s Orion spacecraft to the SLS rocket’s interim cryogenic propulsion stage (ICPS) – in preparation for the installation of its diaphragm. The installation Nov. 30 marks one of the final steps for the adapter before it is readied for shipment to Kennedy via NASA’s Super Guppy cargo aircraft.

“The diaphragm is a composite, dome-shaped structure that isolates the volume above the ICPS from that below Orion,” said Brent Gaddes, lead for the Orion stage adapter, in the Spacecraft/Payload Integration & Evolution Office for the SLS Program at Marshall. “It serves as a barrier between the two, preventing the highly flammable hydrogen gas that could escape the rocket’s propellant tanks from building up beneath the Orion spacecraft and its crew before and during launch.”

At five feet tall and weighing in at 1,800 pounds, the adapter is the smallest major element of the SLS rocket that will produce more than 8.8 million pounds of thrust to launch four Artemis astronauts inside Orion around the Moon. The adapter is fully manufactured by engineering teams at Marshall.

NASA is working to land the first woman and first person of color on the Moon under Artemis. SLS is part of NASA’s backbone for deep space exploration, along with Orion and the Gateway in orbit around the Moon, and commercial human landing systems. SLS is the only rocket that can send Orion, astronauts, and supplies to the Moon in a single launch.

For more on NASA SLS visit:

https://www.nasa.gov/sls



Photo caption:

Quote
Engineers at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center flip the Artemis II Orion stage adapter for installation of its diaphragm Nov. 30.
NASA/Sam Lott

Online ddspaceman

NASA's Johnson Space Center
@NASA_Johnson
Sliding into the holidays like…

Recently, the Artemis II crew practiced how to safely get themselves out of @NASA_Orion post-splashdown, should there be an emergency reason they need to leave the capsule prior to the recovery team arriving.

https://twitter.com/NASA_Johnson/status/1736770415257591904

Online FutureSpaceTourist

  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 47390
  • UK
    • Plan 28
  • Liked: 80236
  • Likes Given: 36319
https://flic.kr/p/2pnn6bW

Quote
NASA Kennedy
KSC-20231213-PH-FMX01_0024


Technicians with Exploration Ground Systems perform inspections of the Northrop Grumman-manufactured two aft exit cones on Wednesday, Dec. 13, 2023, inside the Rotation, Processing and Surge Facility (RPSF) at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida before mating processes begin for the agency’s Artemis II mission. The aft exit cones are attached to the bottom piece of the two boosters, (seen here in these photos), which is called the aft segment, and the exit cones act like a battery pack to provide added thrust for the boosters while protecting the aft skirts from thermal environment during launch of the agency’s first crewed mission under Artemis that will test all of the Orion spacecraft systems. Photo credit: NASA/Frank Michaux

https://flic.kr/p/2pnn6uw

Quote
NASA Kennedy
KSC-20231213-PH-FMX01_0012


Technicians with Exploration Ground Systems perform inspections of the Northrop Grumman-manufactured two aft exit cones on Wednesday, Dec. 13, 2023, inside the Rotation, Processing and Surge Facility (RPSF) at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida before mating processes begin for the agency’s Artemis II mission. The aft exit cones are attached to the bottom piece of the two boosters, (seen here in these photos), which is called the aft segment, and the exit cones act like a battery pack to provide added thrust for the boosters while protecting the aft skirts from thermal environment during launch of the agency’s first crewed mission under Artemis that will test all of the Orion spacecraft systems. Photo credit: NASA/Frank Michaux

https://flic.kr/p/2pnf7mN

Quote
NASA Kennedy
KSC-20231213-PH-FMX01_0008


Technicians with Exploration Ground Systems perform pre-mate inspections of the Northrop Grumman-manufactured right aft exit cone of the Artemis II Space Launch Systems solid rocket boosters on Wednesday, Dec. 13, 2023, inside the Rotation, Processing and Surge Facility (RPSF) at NASAâs Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Each of the two aft exit cones will be prepared for the agencyâs Artemis II flight and attach to the aft segments of the Space Launch Systems solid rocket boosters. The exit cones act like a battery pack to provide added thrust for the boosters while protecting the aft skirts from thermal environment during launch. Photo credit: NASA/Frank Michaux
« Last Edit: 12/18/2023 09:12 pm by FutureSpaceTourist »

Tags:
 

Advertisement NovaTech
Advertisement Northrop Grumman
Advertisement
Advertisement Margaritaville Beach Resort South Padre Island
Advertisement Brady Kenniston
Advertisement NextSpaceflight
Advertisement Nathan Barker Photography
1