Author Topic: Artemis II (EM-2) UPDATES [Weisman, Glover, Hansen, Koch] - late November 2024  (Read 65356 times)

Offline yg1968

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https://www.nasa.gov/exploration/systems/sls/nasa-deputy-administrator-melroy-views-artemis-ii-core-stage-at-michoud.html

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NASA Deputy Administrator Pam Melroy, middle, and Dr. Quincy K. Brown, front right, senior policy advisor in the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy, are shown the core stage of NASA’s Space Launch System (SLS) rocket by Jennifer Boland-Masterson, left, director of manufacturing and site leader at NASA’s Michoud Assembly Facility for Boeing, during a March 31 visit to Michoud in New Orleans. They are accompanied by Michoud Facility Director Lonnie Dutreix, back right. The 212-foot-tall core stage and its four RS-25 engines will help power NASA’s Artemis II flight test, the first crewed Artemis mission that will send four astronauts around the Moon and return them home to test the spacecraft in deep space ahead of lunar surface missions. Teams at Michoud recently integrated the last of the five major core stage structures and unboxed the four RS-25 engines. NASA and Boeing, the core stage lead contractor, along with Aerojet Rocketdyne, the RS-25 engine lead contractor, are preparing to install the engines to the base of the rocket’s core stage. The core stage and its RS-25 engines produce more than 2 million pounds of thrust at launch.

NASA is working to land the first woman and first person of color on the Moon under Artemis. SLS is part of NASA’s backbone for deep space exploration, along with Orion and the Gateway in orbit around the Moon. SLS is the only rocket that can send Orion, astronauts, and supplies to the Moon in a single mission.

Image credit: NASA/Michael DeMocker

Online FutureSpaceTourist

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https://twitter.com/ulalaunch/status/1645421618351710209

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The second #ICPS, built by ULA under a collaborative partnership with @BoeingSpace, is beginning pre-flight testing and preparations to help launch four pioneering astronauts on @NASA's #Artemis II mission around the Moon!

Read more in the blog:

https://blog.ulalaunch.com/blog/icps-2-ula-begins-readying-upper-stage-for-artemis-ii-launch

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ICPS-2: ULA begins readying upper stage for Artemis II launch
April 10, 2023

The second Interim Cryogenic Propulsion Stage (ICPS), derived from the United Launch Alliance (ULA) Delta IV Heavy rocket, is beginning pre-flight testing and preparations to help launch four pioneering astronauts on NASA's Artemis II mission around the Moon.

ICPS serves as the upper stage of the Space Launch System (SLS) rocket to send the Orion spacecraft on lunar exploration missions. The fully integrated SLS, ICPS and Orion system successfully performed the uncrewed Artemis I test flight in 2022.

ULA has manufactured three ICPS stages in our factory in Decatur, Alabama, under a collaborative partnership with Boeing. The stages will be used for the initial three SLS rockets.

ICPS-2 was delivered to ULA facilities at Cape Canaveral in 2021. The stage recently came out of storage and moved into a test cell at the Delta Operation Center to begin undergoing checkouts and processing to support the Artemis II launch.

The ICPS is based on the five-meter-diameter version of ULA's Delta Cryogenic Second Stage (DCSS) that has flown on Delta IV missions since 2004 with 100 percent mission success. ICPS-1 performance for the Artemis I mission was nominal, delivering the push needed to send Orion out of Earth orbit to travel around the Moon.

ICPS features a slightly larger liquid hydrogen tank as compared to the Delta IV second stage, as well as electrical and mechanical interfaces specific to attaching and supporting the Orion spacecraft, and a second hydrazine bottle for additional attitude control propellant.

The ICPS for Artemis II also includes an Emergency Detection System (EDS) and other hardware changes specific to human safety.

The stage feeds liquid hydrogen and liquid oxygen to the Aerojet Rocketdyne RL10C-2 main engine to produce 24,750 pounds (110.1 kilo-Newtons) of highly efficient thrust.

The ICPS-2 stage on Artemis II will provide the boost for the Orion capsule and its four astronauts to reach the desired high Earth orbit stretching 68,000 miles (109,435 km) above the planet before separating from the Moon-bound spacecraft.

The stage will also be used as a target object for Orion to test rendezvous and proximity operations.

The approximately 10-day Artemis II flight will prove the Orion spacecraft's life-support systems and validate the capabilities and techniques needed for humans to live and work in deep space. 

NASA has assigned three Americans and one Canadian Space Agency astronaut to the mission: Commander Reid Wiseman, Pilot Victor Glover, Mission Specialist 1 Christina Hammock Koch and Mission Specialist 2 Jeremy Hansen.

Photo captions:

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ICPS-2 is moved to the Delta Operations Center at Cape Canaveral for processing. Photo by United Launch Alliance

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ICPS-2 arrives at the Delta Operations Center to prepare for the Artemis II mission. Photo by United Launch Alliance

Offline whitelancer64

I dunno if this is the best place for this, but I haven't seen it posted elsewhere.

One of the ML's elevators has already been repaired.

The ML will be returned to the pad this summer for testing.

https://twitter.com/Bubbinski/status/1633158117889572864

https://twitter.com/Bubbinski/status/1633156496250011648
"One bit of advice: it is important to view knowledge as sort of a semantic tree -- make sure you understand the fundamental principles, ie the trunk and big branches, before you get into the leaves/details or there is nothing for them to hang on to." - Elon Musk
"There are lies, damned lies, and launch schedules." - Larry J

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https://twitter.com/ulalaunch/status/1651626106250747904

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#ICYMI // The second #ICPS, built by ULA under a collaborative partnership with @BoeingSpace is undergoing testing and preps to help launch four pioneering astronauts on @NASA's #Artemis Il mission around the Moon!

Read more in the blog: https://blog.ulalaunch.com/blog/icps-2-ula-begins-readying-upper-stage-for-artemis-ii-launch

Offline Vahe231991

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NASA is using lasers to evolve how the agency communicates between spacecraft.

In the past, the space agency has relied on radio signals beamed through its Deep Space Network to transmit any sort of scientific data from deep space probes back to Earth. Lasers, however, have the ability to vastly increase the amount of data spacecraft are able to send, and NASA is ready to send the technology around the moon.

NASA is including laser communications in the form of the Orion Artemis 2 Optical Communications System (O2O) terminal on Artemis 2, the next crewed mission around the moon. "Onboard the Orion capsule, the O2O system will send back high-resolution images and video from the lunar region," a NASA video published in April states. If all goes according to plan, the system should enable viewers on Earth to see the moon in real-time like never before.

https://www.space.com/nasa-artemis-2-laser-communications-video [From May 7]

Online eeergo

Latest status of where things stand for Artemis II:

https://twitter.com/genejm29/status/1658123935240667138
Schedule estimates from second attached slide:
- All Artemis II hardware complete and ready for delivery within 2023, with positive margins.- CM about to undergo final installations.- SM in integrated testing (with CMA attached).
- CS-2 engined next month, completed a couple of months after that (complete by early Fall).- ICPS at the Cape, but in ULA facilities for now for testing.- LVSA ready for delivery.
- SRMs awaiting action in Utah.- ML-1 on track to support current Artemis II launch date, including crew mods to pad.
« Last Edit: 05/15/2023 03:08 pm by eeergo »
-DaviD-

Offline arthuroMo

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« Last Edit: 05/15/2023 03:26 pm by arthuroMo »

Offline ddspaceman

« Last Edit: 05/15/2023 06:07 pm by ddspaceman »

Offline Eric Hedman

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https://twitter.com/NASAArtemis/status/1658168728188583936

Much more info here:
https://www.nasa.gov/feature/nasa-gears-up-to-train-artemis-ii-crew-for-moon-mission
Is it safe to assume that NASA has a few spare astronauts in this training just in case one of the named crew members has an issue that prevents them from going, such as a health issue?

Offline ddspaceman


Offline Vahe231991

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The Artemis II mission’s laser communication system, the Orion Artemis II Optical Communications System (O2O), has arrived at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center. O2O, which enhances data transmission, will send high-definition videos and other information from the moon to Earth, supporting further space exploration and discoveries.

The laser communications system for NASA’s Artemis II mission arrived at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida for integration with the Orion spacecraft, which will carry astronauts around the Moon for the first time since the Apollo missions.

https://scitechdaily.com/nasas-artemis-ii-moon-mission-innovative-o2o-laser-communications-system-delivered/?expand_article=1

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https://www.nasa.gov/exploration/systems/sls/nasa-rocket-flight-software-for-artemis-ii-meets-testing-checkpoint.html

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Jul 3, 2023
NASA Rocket Flight Software for Artemis II Meets Testing Checkpoint

The first Artemis astronauts have begun crew training for their Artemis II mission around the Moon, and teams at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, are testing and configuring the flight software for the mega Moon rocket that will launch them on their journey.

When NASA’s SLS (Space Launch System) launches NASA’s Artemis II crew aboard the Orion spacecraft, it will produce more than 8.8 million pounds of thrust. The SLS rocket’s flight software acts as the “brains” of the rocket, activating 48 hours prior to launch to command all that power and energy for the first eight minutes of the mission through the separation of its in-space propulsion stage. Inside the SLS Software Development Facility (SDF) at Marshall, software engineers recently completed the first part of formal qualification testing for the Artemis II SLS flight software.

The rocket’s flight software consists of approximately 50,000 lines of code. To test the SLS computer systems and flight software ahead of launch, a team inside the SDF simulates a series of normal and off-nominal SLS- rocket and environmental scenarios, called test cases. SLS flight software qualification testing includes multiple test procedures to verify software requirements. By the conclusion of the two-week test period on May 15, engineers had completed 179 test procedures with approximately 58,000 test cases. In comparison, the first phase of qualification testing for Artemis II completed in 2022 had 72 test procedures consisting of 9,500 test cases.

“The SLS flight software team integrated operational improvements and new test scenarios in preparation for Artemis II based on lessons learned from the successful launch of Artemis I in November 2022,” said Dan Mitchell, NASA’s lead SLS integrated avionics and software engineer. “The test facilities at Marshall Space Flight Center have the capability to produce thousands of test cases the SLS flight software is required to detect and respond to appropriately on launch day, offering us the opportunity to assess and certify all the major software elements and systems on the rocket before the first crew flies on SLS.”

The second and final phase of formal qualification testing for the SLS flight software in the SDF is set to begin in July. Beginning in the fall, engineers will begin integrated system testing in the SLS System Integration Lab (SIL) using the full suite of SLS avionics hardware and flight software. Together, the test results from the SIL system and the flight software SDF will provide teams key evidence to support mission readiness for Artemis II. By the time the SLS rocket launches Artemis II, flight software engineers will have “flown” the SLS mission more than 100,000 times within the various SLS avionics and software development and test facilities.

NASA is working to land the first woman and first person of color on the Moon under Artemis. SLS is part of NASA’s backbone for deep space exploration, along with the Orion spacecraft, advanced spacesuits and rovers, the Gateway in orbit around the Moon, and commercial human landing systems. SLS is the only rocket that can send Orion, astronauts, and supplies to the Moon in a single mission.

Image Credit: NASA/ Brandon Hancock

Last Updated: Jul 3, 2023
Editor: Lee Mohon
Tags:  Artemis, Moon to Mars, Space Launch System

Offline yg1968

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NASA's Artemis II Moon Mission Preparations: Latest News and Updates (Official NASA Briefing):


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https://flic.kr/p/2oURnm3

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United Launch Alliance (ULA) affixed a rendezvous target on the second Interim Cryogenic Propulsion Stage (ICPS-2) that the Artemis II astronauts will use in guiding their Orion spacecraft through demonstrations of proximity operations. Photo credit: United Launch Alliance

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https://twitter.com/nasa_sls/status/1701997850995970099

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🚀 MILESTONE ALERT

The RS-25 engine installation process has begun for the SLS rocket that will help power @NASAArtemis II. The engines produce more than 2 million pounds of thrust to help send @NASA_Orion and the crew inside around the Moon.

LEARN MORE: https://blogs.nasa.gov/artemis/2023/09/13/first-rs-25-engine-installed-to-nasas-artemis-ii-moon-rocket/
« Last Edit: 09/13/2023 05:18 pm by FutureSpaceTourist »

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https://twitter.com/nasaspaceflight/status/1702353004278505635

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The SLS core stage for Artemis II has begun RS-25 engine installation operations.

NSF's Philip Sloss spoke with Bill Muddle, Lead RS-25 Field Integration Engineer for Aerojet Rocketdyne.

https://www.nasaspaceflight.com/2023/09/rs-25-installation-artemis-ii-core-stage/

Online Conexion Espacial

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The train with the SRB segments for the SLS Artemis II has been shipped to KSC and is expected to arrive early next week.
« Last Edit: 09/21/2023 10:05 pm by Conexion Espacial »
I publish information in Spanish about space and rockets.
www.x.com/conexionspacial

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https://twitter.com/senbillnelson/status/1706375215901520252

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Progress to the pad! All four RS-25 engines now added to our Artemis II @NASA_SLS Moon rocket. Harnessing the knowledge learned from #Artemis I, teams at Michoud Assembly Facility are working to fully integrate and secure all the engines onto the @NASAArtemis II core stage to prepare the mega rocket that will help send astronauts around the Moon.

https://blogs.nasa.gov/artemis/2023/09/25/all-engines-added-to-nasas-artemis-ii-moon-rocket-core-stage/
« Last Edit: 09/25/2023 07:31 pm by FutureSpaceTourist »

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https://twitter.com/nasaspaceflight/status/1706360748354462176

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Here come the Artemis II SRB segments that will provide most of the power to launch the next SLS rocket into space, this time with crew.

nsf.live/spacecoast

https://twitter.com/jerrypikephoto/status/1706407360674111780

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10 total segments make up two 5 segment SRBs that power the SLS rocket🚀

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