Poll

Which missions should be included on the manifest list as space tourism?

Only missions with a participant who paid for their trip (so not including MS-19)
2 (10%)
Current proposed list (non-professional astronauts with at most a few months training on a commercially purchased flight)
4 (20%)
Any non-professional astronaut mission with a seat bought commercially (so include Helen Sharman, but not Bill Nelson etc)
8 (40%)
Any mission with non-professional astronauts regardless who pays (so include Helen Sharman & Bill Nelson etc)
6 (30%)

Total Members Voted: 20

Voting closed: 05/24/2021 11:30 pm


Author Topic: Space tourism resurgence and manifest  (Read 46253 times)

Online FutureSpaceTourist

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Space tourism resurgence and manifest
« on: 05/14/2021 06:25 pm »
There doesn’t appear to be a live space tourism thread (that isn’t provider specific), so starting this one with all the current activity and announcements (Inspiration 4, Soyuz trips to ISS, Axiom, Blue Origin suborbital etc)

Here’s an overview of recent news by Scott Manley:



Quote
There were 8 flights to the ISS between 2001 and 2009 carrying private spaceflight participants, or, Space Tourists. Nobody has flown since then except for a couple of suborbital hops on Virgin Galactic. Now the prospect of space tourism is back in force with 4 flights scheduled to orbit and more on the horizon carrying a dozen participants to one of the most exclusive destinations.

P.S. Not interested in a debate about the merits, or otherwise, of the term space tourism. It’s a widely used term. If you want to debate it then start another thread!
« Last Edit: 05/15/2021 09:18 am by FutureSpaceTourist »

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Re: Space tourism resurgence
« Reply #1 on: 05/15/2021 07:00 am »
Orbital and Beyond Manifest

Work in progress

As per the poll result, this orbital manifest lists any flights with a non-professional astronaut whose seat was bought commercially. It therefore excludes government funded missions (such as Bill Nelson and Christa McAuliffe).

Soyuz MS-19 is currently listed but it’s funding is unclear. If it proves to be a government funded mission then it will be removed.

First number under Crew is number of tourists (non-professional crew members). Number in parentheses is professional crew. So total people on the mission is the sum.

Destination LF is lunar flyby

       Launch    Land/Splashdown
Date Time (UTC)Date Time (UTC)DurationCraftMissionCrewDestination
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
1990/12/021990/12/108dSoyuzSoyuz TM-11 (Toyohiro Akiyama)1 (2)Mir
1991/05/181991/05/268dSoyuzSoyuz TM-12 (Helen Sharman)1 (2)Mir
2001/04/282001/05/068dSoyuzISS EP-1 (Dennis Tito)1 (2)ISS
2002/04/252002/05/0510dSoyuzISS EP-2 (Mark Shuttleworth)1 (2)ISS
2002/10/012002/10/1010dSoyuzISS EP-3 (Gregory Olsen)1 (2)ISS
2006/09/202006/09/2910dSoyuzISS EP-4 (Anousheh Ansari)1 (2)ISS
2007/04/072007/04/2110dSoyuzISS EP-12 (Charles Simonyi)1 (2)ISS
2008/10/122008/10/2413dSoyuzISS EP-13 (Richard Garriott)1 (2)ISS
2009/03/26 11:492009/04/0814dSoyuzISS EP-14 (Charles Simonyi)1 (2)ISS
2009/09/302009/10/11 04:3212dSoyuzISS EP-15 (Guy Laliberté)1 (2)ISS
2021/09/16 00:022021/09/18 23:072d23h5mDragonInspiration44 (0)LEO (575km)
2021/10/05 08:552021/10/17 04:3511d19h40mSoyuzSoyuz MS-192 (1)ISS
2021/12/08 07:382021/12/20 03:1311d19h35mSoyuzSoyuz MS-202 (1)ISS
2022/04/08 15:172022/04/25 17:0617d1h49mDragonAxiom 13 (1)ISS
2023/05/21 21:372023/05/31 03:049d5h27mDragonDiscovery: Axiom 23 (1)ISS
2024/01/18 21:492024/02/09 13:3021d15h41mDragonAxiom 33 (1)ISS
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
2024 Q3?2024 Q3?5dDragonPolaris Dawn2 (2)LEO
2024 Oct2024 Oct14dDragonAxiom 43 (1)ISS
2025?2025???DragonPolaris Mission 2? (?)LEO
2026?2026???StarshipPolaris Mission 3? (?)LEO
2026?2026?1wStarshipdearMoon9 (?)LF
2025??< 30 daysDragonVast-14? (?)Haven-1
202?202?1wStarship2nd private lunar fly-by (Titos)12 (?)LF
« Last Edit: 02/10/2024 04:55 am by FutureSpaceTourist »

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Re: Space tourism resurgence
« Reply #2 on: 05/15/2021 07:03 am »
Suborbital Manifest

Work in progress

Time is launch time.

First number under Crew is number of tourists (non-professional crew members). Number in parentheses is professional crew. So total people on the mission is the sum.

.....Booster
Date Time (UTC)SpacecraftMissionCrewApogee (MSL)/ CarrierSpacecraft Id
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
2021/07/11 14:38SpaceShipTwoUnity 22 (Branson)1 (5)282k ftVMS EveVSS Unity
2021/07/20 13:12New ShepardNS Flight 16 (Bezos)4 (0)351,210 ftNSRSS First Step
2021/10/13 14:49New ShepardNS Flight 18 (Shatner)3 (1)351,186 ftNS 4.3RSS First Step
2021/12/11 15:00New ShepardNS Flight 196 (0)351,225 ftNS 4.4RSS First Step
2022/03/31 13:57New ShepardNS Flight 206 (0)351,274 ftNS 4.5RSS First Step
2022/06/04 13:25New ShepardNS Flight 216 (0)351,183 ftNS 4.6RSS First Step
2022/08/06 13:56New ShepardNS Flight 226 (0)351,231 ftNS 4.7RSS First Step
2023/05/25 16:23SpaceShipTwoUnity 250 (6)286k ftVMS EveVSS Unity
2023/06/29 15:30SpaceShipTwoGalactic 013 (3)279k ftVMS EveVSS Unity
2023/08/10 14:30SpaceShipTwoGalactic 023 (3)290k ftVMS EveVSS Unity
2023/09/08 14:34SpaceShipTwoGalactic 033 (3)290k ftVMS EveVSS Unity
2023/10/06 14:28SpaceShipTwoGalactic 043 (3)287k ftVMS EveVSS Unity
2023/11/02SpaceShipTwoGalactic 053 (3)286k ftVMS EveVSS Unity
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
2024/01SpaceShipTwoGalactic 064 (2)??
« Last Edit: 11/14/2023 07:13 pm by FutureSpaceTourist »

Offline scientist

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Re: Space tourism resurgence and manifest
« Reply #3 on: 05/17/2021 08:13 pm »
Thank you for compiling this list.

If I may, I'd like to make an observation concerning Soyuz MS-19. That mission doesn't fit with the others in the list because none of the crew are paying for their seat by themselves.

I'm not sure who exactly is paying for their flight. In case it is the film studio, then it is more similar to the flights of Toyohiro Akiyama and Helen Sharman to Mir in the 90's. If Roscosmos pays the bill then their roles are more similar to the payload specialists or teachers that flew on the Space Shuttle. But in any case it's not like the other tourist flights.

Offline freddo411

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Re: Space tourism resurgence and manifest
« Reply #4 on: 05/17/2021 08:33 pm »
This thread is a GREAT idea.   Thanks for starting it.

I can see the future that having an entire section on NSF may be warranted.

Space Tourism looks to be growing exponentially.   2021 looks to have nearly as many tourists as the entire decade of the aughts.

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Re: Space tourism resurgence and manifest
« Reply #5 on: 05/17/2021 11:18 pm »
Thank you for compiling this list.

If I may, I'd like to make an observation concerning Soyuz MS-19. That mission doesn't fit with the others in the list because none of the crew are paying for their seat by themselves.

I'm not sure who exactly is paying for their flight. In case it is the film studio, then it is more similar to the flights of Toyohiro Akiyama and Helen Sharman to Mir in the 90's. If Roscosmos pays the bill then their roles are more similar to the payload specialists or teachers that flew on the Space Shuttle. But in any case it's not like the other tourist flights.

You raise a good question about who warrants inclusion on the list. I don’t think there is a right or wrong answer, different definitions just result in different lists. However, the list needs to have a definition, not least to ensure some consistency!

For my definition, I do not care who paid for the flight; as I’m interested in people who go to space who are not professional astronauts. If we restrict the list to those that pay, then we would exclude dearMoon participants who are not paying, and that doesn’t seem right to me. Similarly, an actress and director on MS-19 are definitely non-professional astronauts, who I want to include. (Or Tom Cruise if he flies.) Personally, I’ve always thought of space tourism quite broadly and don’t think of it as the same as going on vacation.

On that basis arguably at least Toyohiro Akiyama and Helen Sharman should be included too. However, my understanding is that both underwent extensive cosmonaut training of between 12 and 18 months? Similarly for the tragic case of Christa McAuliffe, or indeed Bill Nelson. To me, the extent and nature of their training is qualitatively different and makes them closer to professional astronauts.

I don’t feel very strongly about it and fully accept that one definition of a ‘space tourist’ is a non-professional astronaut whose trip is purchased commercially. On that basis Toyohiro Akiyama and Helen Sharman would be included.

I’ll add a poll to see what people would find more useful / interesting.

Offline scientist

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Re: Space tourism resurgence and manifest
« Reply #6 on: 05/18/2021 12:52 am »
I voted for the most inclusive option - I think there weren't too many non-professional astronaut missions in history, even including the non-commercial ones, so it can be useful to have them all in one list.

By the way, I looked through the Soyuz MS-19 thread, and it isn't clear if those seats were bought commercially or just provided as a government contribution to the project. So that flight might be actually in the non-commercial category.

Online FutureSpaceTourist

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Re: Space tourism resurgence and manifest
« Reply #7 on: 05/18/2021 08:11 am »
By the way, I looked through the Soyuz MS-19 thread, and it isn't clear if those seats were bought commercially or just provided as a government contribution to the project. So that flight might be actually in the non-commercial category.

Yes, you’re right - it’s very unclear. All the press releases etc just talk about a collaboration between Roscosmos and the Russian network, First Channel. Not stated if any money is changing hands, although we know Roscosmos finances are not great (but as you say could be government funded).

Offline Steven Pietrobon

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Re: Space tourism resurgence and manifest
« Reply #8 on: 05/18/2021 08:14 am »
If the seat was paid for by the government, then it is not commercial and should be excluded.
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Online FutureSpaceTourist

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Re: Space tourism resurgence and manifest
« Reply #9 on: 05/18/2021 11:14 am »
https://twitter.com/asollowayuk/status/1394600785430843394

Quote
Today marks 30 years since Helen Sharman became the first British person to go to space.

Helen paved the way for so many future astronauts to boldly go where few have gone before and played a pioneering role in our understanding of the Universe.

https://www.yorkshirepost.co.uk/heritage-and-retro/heritage/30-years-on-sheffield-astronaut-helen-sharman-is-still-a-role-model-3237696

Offline hektor

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Re: Space tourism resurgence and manifest
« Reply #10 on: 05/18/2021 11:52 am »
I find it exaggerated to characterize actors who go to film on ISS as tourists. When Tom Cruise goes to Dubai to shoot Mission: Impossible – Ghost Protocol, you do not call him a tourist in Dubai.

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Re: Space tourism resurgence and manifest
« Reply #11 on: 05/18/2021 02:53 pm »
https://twitter.com/thesheetztweetz/status/1394662341808115720

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Discovery announces competition TV series "Who Wants To Be An Astronaut?"

"Contestants will have the opportunity to compete for an official spot aboard an upcoming Axiom mission, expected to be AX-2."

Edit to add:

https://www.discovery.com/shows/who-wants-to-be-an-astronaut+

Quote
Have you ever gazed up at the stars and wondered what it would feel like to be looking back down at Earth? Are you a space enthusiast who would give anything to travel to space, but never thought you'd have an opportunity? Welcome to WHO WANTS TO BE AN ASTRONAUT - the ultimate chance of a lifetime. Compete for a seat on a flight to the International Space Station where the winner will be able to do something only a handful of humans have ever done...travel into space.

We're not looking for rocket scientists - this is an opportunity for regular people to have the chance to travel to space and share that journey with the world. (Ok, ok, if you're a rocket scientist you're welcome to apply too!)

If this sounds like a mission you want to be part of, now is your chance. Fill out the application below and submit a short video (30-60 seconds) telling us about yourself, why you deserve a chance to travel to space, what it would mean to you, and why you want to participate. We can't wait to hear from you.

Good luck!

Applicants must be a U.S. citizen or a legal U.S. resident, be 18 years of age or older, be of a fitness level commensurate with space flight (in good health, able to withstand physical exertion, and meet other space travel related requirements. Applicants must be able to read, write and be fluent in the English language for purposes of training, as well as be willing to undergo a psychological, physical and background examination before being cleared to participate fully.

You can apply at: https://space.castingcrane.com/

Edit to add: separate thread at

https://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=51964.0
« Last Edit: 08/14/2022 12:44 am by FutureSpaceTourist »

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Re: Space tourism resurgence and manifest
« Reply #12 on: 05/20/2021 08:10 pm »
https://twitter.com/spcplcyonline/status/1395471025341616131

Quote
I also asked how NASA astronauts feel about the many private astronauts going to ISS--if they'll have adequate training, be disruptive. She said NASA has agreements w/the companies flying them about expected behaviors, etc.

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Re: Space tourism resurgence and manifest
« Reply #13 on: 05/31/2021 08:39 pm »
A belated thanks to those of you who voted in the poll (and for giving a clear result!).

I have updated the orbital manifest in the second post in this thread accordingly.

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Re: Space tourism resurgence and manifest
« Reply #14 on: 06/02/2021 03:19 pm »
https://twitter.com/axiom_space/status/1400105096785051648

Quote
You wanted a market for commercial human spaceflight?

It's here.

Ax-1, Ax-2, Ax-3, and Ax-4 – all now confirmed to fly on @SpaceX's Dragon.
« Last Edit: 06/02/2021 03:19 pm by FutureSpaceTourist »

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Re: Space tourism resurgence and manifest
« Reply #15 on: 06/02/2021 03:22 pm »
https://www.spacex.com/updates/axiom-announcement/index.html

Quote
SPACEX TO LAUNCH FOUR AXIOM MISSIONS TO ISS

Developed by SpaceX to support NASA’s Commercial Crew Program, Dragon helped return human spaceflight capabilities in 2020 and has successfully flown three human spaceflight missions to the International Space Station (ISS) to-date. In addition to flying astronauts to space for NASA, Dragon can also carry commercial astronauts to Earth orbit, the ISS or beyond.

Today, Axiom Space announced SpaceX will fly three additional private crew missions aboard Dragon to and from the Station through 2023. Axiom previously announced their first mission to the International Space Station flying aboard Dragon, currently targeted to liftoff no earlier than January 2022. In May 2021, Axiom announced that astronaut Peggy Whitson and champion GT racer John Shoffner will serve as commander and pilot on the Ax-2 mission.

All four crews will receive combined commercial astronaut training from NASA and SpaceX, with SpaceX providing training on the Falcon 9 launch vehicle and Dragon spacecraft, emergency preparedness training, spacesuit and spacecraft ingress and egress exercises, as well as partial and full simulations.

The growing partnership between Axiom and SpaceX will enable more opportunities for more humans in space on the road to making humanity multiplanetary.

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Re: Space tourism resurgence and manifest
« Reply #16 on: 06/11/2021 08:31 pm »
https://www.nasa.gov/leo-economy/NASA-seeks-proposals-next2-private-astronaut-missions-ISS

Quote
Jun 11, 2021

NASA Seeks Proposals for Next 2 Private Astronaut Missions to Space Station

NASA is seeking proposals for two new private astronaut missions to the International Space Station as part of the agency’s efforts to open space to more people than ever before. With these opportunities, U.S. commercial companies will continue to play an essential role in establishing a sustained presence in low-Earth orbit (LEO) through the agency’s Commercial LEO Development Program.

The first targeted flight opportunity will occur between fall of 2022 and mid-2023 and the second will occur between mid-2023 and the end of 2023. Proposals are due Friday, July 9, 2021 at 5 p.m. EDT. NASA will host a pre-proposer’s conference to field industry questions related to this announcement on Tuesday, June 22, 2021 at 3:30 p.m. EDT. To confirm attendance, please email Karen Dailey at [email protected].

A private astronaut mission involves U.S. commercial spacecraft transporting private astronauts to the space station, where they conduct activities aboard the orbiting laboratory or a commercial structure attached to it. NASA is enabling up to two short-duration private astronaut missions per year.

“This year is truly a renaissance for human spaceflight both as we fly NASA and international partner astronauts on U.S. commercial crew spacecraft to the International Space Station and also as we see the expansion of private astronaut missions,” said Phil McAlister, director of commercial spaceflight development at NASA Headquarters. “As more people fly to space and do more things during their spaceflights, it attracts even more people to do more activities in low-Earth orbit, and reflects the growing market we envisioned when we began the Commercial Crew Program 10 years ago.”

The new targeted flight opportunities will be the second and third private astronaut missions to the International Space Station. NASA signed an agreement with Axiom Space for the first private astronaut mission, to take place no earlier than January 2022.

Each of the new missions may be up to 14 days. Specific dates are dependent on spacecraft traffic to the space station and in-orbit activity planning and constraints. Private astronaut missions must be brokered by a U.S. entity and use U.S. transportation spacecraft that meet NASA’s International Space Station visiting vehicle requirements, policies, and procedures. Refer to Focus Area 4A of NASA Research Announcement (NRA) NNJ13ZBG001N for additional details.

Enabling private astronaut missions to the International Space Station is part of the agency's goal to develop a robust low-Earth orbit economy where NASA is one of many customers, and the private sector leads the way. This strategy will provide services the government needs at a lower cost, enabling the agency to focus on its Artemis missions to the Moon and on to Mars while continuing to use low-Earth orbit as a training and proving ground for those deep space missions.

For questions about the solicitation, contact [email protected].

For media assistance, please contact:

Stephanie Schierholz
202-358-1100
[email protected]

Gary Jordan
281-483-5111
[email protected]

Last Updated: Jun 11, 2021
Editor: Ana Guzman

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Re: Space tourism resurgence and manifest
« Reply #17 on: 07/03/2021 01:24 pm »
https://www.cnbc.com/2021/07/03/richard-branson-space-tourism-market-has-room-for-20-companies.html

Quote
Richard Branson believes the space market has room for 20 companies launching tourists
PUBLISHED SAT, JUL 3 20218:26 AM EDT
Michael Sheetz
@THESHEETZTWEETZ

KEY POINTS

Sir Richard Branson believes there is plenty of opportunity in the market for companies like Virgin Galactic, Jeff Bezos’ Blue Origin, or Elon Musk’s SpaceX.

“There’s room for 20 space companies to take people up there,” Branson told CNBC.

The companies of Branson, Bezos, and Musk are each flying spacecraft that can carry passengers, but in different ways, as the former two fly to the edge of space while the latter goes further, into orbit.

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Re: Space tourism resurgence and manifest
« Reply #18 on: 07/03/2021 10:46 pm »

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Re: Space tourism resurgence and manifest
« Reply #19 on: 07/03/2021 11:24 pm »
The isn't tourism. It is the most expensive roller coaster.

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