Author Topic: Perseverance, Mars 2020 Rover : Updates  (Read 77186 times)

Offline FutureSpaceTourist

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Re: Perseverance, Mars 2020 Rover : Updates
« Reply #20 on: 03/10/2021 04:07 pm »
https://twitter.com/nasapersevere/status/1369694335168516097

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Things are sounding really good here. Listen to the first sounds of wind captured by my SuperCam microphone. This mic is located at the top of my mast. For this recording, my mast was still down so the sound is a bit muffled.

https://soundcloud.com/nasa/perseverance-mars-supercam-sounds-18-hours-after-landing/s-Da5U96EOyre

Offline FutureSpaceTourist

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Re: Perseverance, Mars 2020 Rover : Updates
« Reply #21 on: 03/25/2021 06:26 pm »
https://twitter.com/tgmetsfan98/status/1375161883972530184

Quote
Perseverance has begun checking its sample collection systems, beginning the challenging task of bringing a piece of Mars back to Earth.

ARTICLE by Justin Davenport (@Bubbinski):

https://www.nasaspaceflight.com/2021/03/mars-sample-return-underway-perseverance/

Offline FutureSpaceTourist

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Re: Perseverance, Mars 2020 Rover : Updates
« Reply #22 on: 04/07/2021 08:10 pm »
https://twitter.com/nasapersevere/status/1379883959006363648

Quote
Two bots, one selfie. Greetings from Jezero Crater, where I’ve taken my first selfie of the mission. I’m also watching the #MarsHelicopter Ingenuity as it gets ready for its first flight in a few days. Daring mighty things indeed.

Images: go.nasa.gov/2RaUBKF

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Re: Perseverance, Mars 2020 Rover : Updates
« Reply #23 on: 04/17/2021 05:55 am »

Offline FutureSpaceTourist

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Re: Perseverance, Mars 2020 Rover : Updates
« Reply #24 on: 04/21/2021 07:44 pm »
https://twitter.com/nasapersevere/status/1384956021177737223

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Another huge first: converting CO2 into oxygen on Mars. Working off the land with what’s already here, my MOXIE instrument has shown it can be done!

Future explorers will need to generate oxygen for rocket fuel and for breathing on the Red Planet.

https://mars.nasa.gov/news/8926/nasas-perseverance-mars-rover-extracts-first-oxygen-from-red-planet/

Quote
April 21, 2021
NASA's Perseverance Mars Rover Extracts First Oxygen From Red Planet

The milestone, which the MOXIE instrument achieved by converting carbon dioxide into oxygen, points the way to future human exploration of the Red Planet.

The growing list of “firsts” for Perseverance, NASA’s newest six-wheeled robot on the Martian surface, includes converting some of the Red Planet’s thin, carbon dioxide-rich atmosphere into oxygen. A toaster-size, experimental instrument aboard Perseverance called the Mars Oxygen In-Situ Resource Utilization Experiment (MOXIE) accomplished the task. The test took place April 20, the 60th Martian day, or sol, since the mission landed Feb. 18.

While the technology demonstration is just getting started, it could pave the way for science fiction to become science fact – isolating and storing oxygen on Mars to help power rockets that could lift astronauts off the planet’s surface. Such devices also might one day provide breathable air for astronauts themselves. MOXIE is an exploration technology investigation – as is the Mars Environmental Dynamics Analyzer (MEDA) weather station – and is sponsored by NASA’s Space Technology Mission Directorate (STMD) and Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate.

“This is a critical first step at converting carbon dioxide to oxygen on Mars,” said Jim Reuter, associate administrator STMD. “MOXIE has more work to do, but the results from this technology demonstration are full of promise as we move toward our goal of one day seeing humans on Mars. Oxygen isn’t just the stuff we breathe. Rocket propellant depends on oxygen, and future explorers will depend on producing propellant on Mars to make the trip home.”

For rockets or astronauts, oxygen is key, said MOXIE’s principal investigator, Michael Hecht of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s Haystack Observatory.

To burn its fuel, a rocket must have more oxygen by weight. To get four astronauts off the Martian surface on a future mission would require approximately 15,000 pounds (7 metric tons) of rocket fuel and 55,000 pounds (25 metric tons) of oxygen. In contrast, astronauts living and working on Mars would require far less oxygen to breathe. “The astronauts who spend a year on the surface will maybe use one metric ton between them,” Hecht said.

Hauling 25 metric tons of oxygen from Earth to Mars would be an arduous task. Transporting a one-ton oxygen converter – a larger, more powerful descendant of MOXIE that could produce those 25 tons – would be far more economical and practical.

Mars’ atmosphere is 96% carbon dioxide. MOXIE works by separating oxygen atoms from carbon dioxide molecules, which are made up of one carbon atom and two oxygen atoms. A waste product, carbon monoxide, is emitted into the Martian atmosphere.

The conversion process requires high levels of heat to reach a temperature of approximately 1,470 degrees Fahrenheit (800 Celsius). To accommodate this, the MOXIE unit is made with heat-tolerant materials. These include 3D-printed nickel alloy parts, which heat and cool the gases flowing through it, and a lightweight aerogel that helps hold in the heat. A thin gold coating on the outside of MOXIE reflects infrared heat, keeping it from radiating outward and potentially damaging other parts of Perseverance.

In this first operation, MOXIE’s oxygen production was quite modest – about 5 grams, equivalent to about 10 minutes’ worth of breathable oxygen for an astronaut. MOXIE is designed to generate up to 10 grams of oxygen per hour.

This technology demonstration was designed to ensure the instrument survived the launch from Earth, a nearly seven-month journey through deep space, and touchdown with Perseverance on Feb. 18. MOXIE is expected to extract oxygen at least nine more times over the course of a Martian year (nearly two years on Earth).

These oxygen-production runs will come in three phases. The first phase will check out and characterize the instrument’s function, while the second phase will run the instrument in varying atmospheric conditions, such as different times of day and seasons. In the third phase, Hecht said, “we’ll push the envelope” – trying new operating modes, or introducing “new wrinkles, such as a run where we compare operations at three or more different temperatures.”

“MOXIE isn’t just the first instrument to produce oxygen on another world,” said Trudy Kortes, director of technology demonstrations within STMD. It’s the first technology of its kind that will help future missions “live off the land,” using elements of another world’s environment, also known as in-situ resource utilization.

“It’s taking regolith, the substance you find on the ground, and putting it through a processing plant, making it into a large structure, or taking carbon dioxide – the bulk of the atmosphere – and converting it into oxygen,” she said. “This process allows us to convert these abundant materials into useable things: propellant, breathable air, or, combined with hydrogen, water.”

More About Perseverance

A key objective of Perseverance’s mission on Mars is astrobiology, including the search for signs of ancient microbial life. The rover will characterize the planet’s geology and past climate, pave the way for human exploration of the Red Planet, and be the first mission to collect and cache Martian rock and regolith (broken rock and dust).

Subsequent NASA missions, in cooperation with ESA (European Space Agency), would send spacecraft to Mars to collect these sealed samples from the surface and return them to Earth for in-depth analysis.

The Mars 2020 Perseverance mission is part of NASA’s Moon to Mars exploration approach, which includes Artemis missions to the Moon that will help prepare for human exploration of the Red Planet.

NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Southern California, which is managed for NASA by Caltech in Pasadena, California, built and manages operations of the Perseverance rover.

For more about Perseverance:

https://mars.nasa.gov/mars2020/

and

https://www.nasa.gov/perseverance

First image caption:

Quote
MOXIE Being Installed in Perseverance: Technicians at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory lower the Mars Oxygen In-Situ Resource Utilization Experiment (MOXIE) instrument into the belly of the Perseverance rover. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech.

Second image caption:

Quote
After a two-hour warmup period, MOXIE began producing oxygen at a rate of 6 grams per hour. The was reduced two times during the run (labeled as “current sweeps”) in order to assess the status of the instrument. After an hour of operation the total oxygen produced was about 5.4 grams, enough to keep an astronaut healthy for about 10 minutes of normal activity.
Credit: MIT Haystack Observatory
« Last Edit: 04/21/2021 07:49 pm by FutureSpaceTourist »

Offline FutureSpaceTourist

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Re: Perseverance, Mars 2020 Rover : Updates
« Reply #25 on: 04/26/2021 03:21 pm »


Quote
This 3D visualization is based on the images taken by the Mastcam-Z instrument aboard NASA's Perseverance rover

Offline FutureSpaceTourist

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Re: Perseverance, Mars 2020 Rover : Updates
« Reply #26 on: 06/01/2021 02:57 pm »
https://twitter.com/nasapersevere/status/1399740871377973250

Quote
100 days (sols) on Mars, and feeling productive:
 
✅ Tested all cameras & instruments
✅ Returned 75,000+ pics
✅ Deployed #MarsHelicopter & captured its flights
✅ Recorded sounds of Mars
✅ Extracted oxygen from atmosphere
✅ Started south to first exploration zone
 
Onward.

Offline FutureSpaceTourist

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Re: Perseverance, Mars 2020 Rover : Updates
« Reply #27 on: 06/10/2021 05:33 pm »



Offline FutureSpaceTourist

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Re: Perseverance, Mars 2020 Rover : Updates
« Reply #28 on: 06/15/2021 03:53 pm »
https://twitter.com/nasapersevere/status/1404829016121483268

Quote
Passed this boulder and took a closer look. Some of my team see similarities to volcanic rocks on Earth. Interesting stuff, but I’m on to more sedimentary types, where rock layers could better preserve any potential signs of ancient life. 🔍

More: https://mars.nasa.gov/mars2020/mission/science/landing-site/

Offline spacexplorer

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Re: Perseverance, Mars 2020 Rover : Updates
« Reply #29 on: 07/02/2021 06:47 am »
New SPICE kernel with real data of EDL is now available in SPK folder:
https://naif.jpl.nasa.gov/pub/naif/MARS2020/kernels/spk/m2020_trajCEDLS-6DOF_ops_od069v1_AL4.bsp

Further updates dated 29/6/2021:
https://naif.jpl.nasa.gov/pub/naif/MARS2020/kernels/spk/m2020_atls_ops210303_v1.bsp
https://naif.jpl.nasa.gov/pub/naif/MARS2020/kernels/spk/m2020_ls_ops210303_iau2000_v1.bsp

In FK folder (reference frames data):
https://naif.jpl.nasa.gov/pub/naif/MARS2020/kernels/fk/m2020_tp_ops210303_iau2000_v1.tf

You can calculate trajectory here specifying "-168" as target and "IAU_MARS" as observer:
https://wgc.jpl.nasa.gov:8443/webgeocalc/#StateVector

I still can't find any data about Ingenuity in frames kernels.

EDL data not yet implemented in NASA Horizons:

  Trajectory files (from JPL Navigation)       Start                End
  --------------------------------------  -----------------  -----------------
  m2020_traj_ops_od002v1.V0.1             2020-Jul-30 12:53  2020-Jul-31 19:01
  m2020_traj_ops_od018v1.V0.1             2020-Jul-31 19:01  2020-Aug-15 17:00
  m2020_traj_ops_od038v1.V0.1             2020-Aug-15 17:00  2020-Sep-30 22:01
  m2020_traj_ops_od071v1.V0.1             2020-Sep-30 22:01  2020-Dec-18 21:01
  m2020_traj_ops_od089v1.V0.1             2020-Dec-18 21:01  2021-Feb-17 20:37
  edl-landed.v0.1                         2021-Feb-17 20:37  2026-Feb-19 00:00
*******************************************************************************


Once it will be implemented, this page should plot the trajectory automatically, without bothering user with SPICE kernels knowledge:
http://win98.altervista.org/space/exploration/3d/space-explorer-tracker.html?orbiter=-168&body=@499&start=2021-FEB-18%2020:40&stop=2021-FEB-18%2020:46&step=200&3dzoom=10000&radius=3392

Key points:
2021-02-18 20:38 (40 km altitude, entry interface)
2021-02-18 20:38 - 2021-02-18 20:40 (Horizontal flight at 13 km altitude)
2021-02-18 20:43:20 150m altitude
2021-02-18 20:44 (landed)

------------

Other update: Ingenuity switched from "engineering tasks" to "science tasks": it will explore in advance targets too far for the rover:

https://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=45676.msg2258911#msg2258911
« Last Edit: 07/02/2021 06:48 am by spacexplorer »

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Offline jacqmans

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Re: Perseverance, Mars 2020 Rover : Updates
« Reply #31 on: 07/17/2021 08:15 am »
July 16, 2021
MEDIA ADVISORY M21-084

NASA to Brief Early Science from Perseverance Mars Rover

NASA will hold a virtual media briefing at 1 p.m. EDT Wednesday, July 21, to discuss early science results from the agency’s Perseverance Mars rover and its preparations to collect the first-ever Martian samples for planned return to Earth.

The briefing will originate from NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Southern California, where the Mars 2020 Perseverance rover mission is managed. It will air live on NASA Television, the NASA app, and the agency’s website and livestream on multiple agency social media platforms, including JPL’s YouTube and Facebook channels.

Briefing participants include:

Thomas Zurbuchen, associate administrator for science, NASA Headquarters
Jennifer Trosper, Perseverance project manager, JPL
Olivier Toupet, Perseverance enhanced navigation team lead, JPL
Ken Farley, Perseverance project scientist, Caltech
Vivian Sun, Perseverance science campaign co-lead, JPL
To participate in the briefing by telephone, reporters must provide their name and affiliation by 11 a.m. EDT Wednesday, July 21, to Rexana Vizza at: [email protected].

Members of the media and the public also may ask questions on social media during the briefing using #AskNASA.

Perseverance landed in Jezero Crater Feb. 18. The rover team recently wrapped up an  initial checkout period, which lasted 90 sols, or Martian days, and which included the Ingenuity Mars Helicopter test flight campaign. Perseverance kicked off the science phase of its mission on June 1.

A key objective for Perseverance’s mission on Mars is astrobiology, including the search for signs of ancient microbial life. The rover will characterize the planet’s geology and past climate, pave the way for human exploration of the Red Planet, and be the first mission to collect and cache Martian rock and regolith.

Subsequent NASA missions, in cooperation with ESA (European Space Agency), would send spacecraft to Mars to collect these sealed samples from the surface and return them to Earth for in-depth analysis.

The Mars 2020 Perseverance mission is part of NASA’s Moon to Mars exploration approach, which includes Artemis missions to the Moon that will help prepare for human exploration of the Red Planet.

JPL is managed for NASA by Caltech in Pasadena, California.

To learn more about Perseverance, visit:

https://nasa.gov/perseverance

and

https://mars.nasa.gov/mars2020/
Jacques :-)

Offline FutureSpaceTourist

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Re: Perseverance, Mars 2020 Rover : Updates
« Reply #32 on: 07/21/2021 05:42 pm »

Offline FutureSpaceTourist

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Re: Perseverance, Mars 2020 Rover : Updates
« Reply #33 on: 08/17/2021 07:04 pm »
https://twitter.com/nasapersevere/status/1427707512908763137

Quote
Skirting a boundary between rough rocks and soft dunes. Views from orbit teach us so much about Mars, but there’s nothing like being here and seeing for yourself.

Latest images: https://mars.nasa.gov/mars2020/multimedia/raw-images/

Offline spacexplorer

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Re: Perseverance, Mars 2020 Rover : Updates
« Reply #34 on: 08/25/2021 10:54 am »
SPICE Kernels updated:
m2020_cruise_od138_v1.bsp                      2021-08-18 09:07  511K
m2020_edl_v01.bsp                              2021-08-18 09:07   10M
m2020_ls_ops210303_iau2000_v1.bsp              2021-06-29 06:12  7.0K 
m2020_struct_v01.bsp                           2021-08-18 09:06   53K 
m2020_surf_rover_loc_0000_0089_v1.bsp          2021-08-18 09:09   57K 
m2020_surf_rover_tlm_0000_0089_v1.bsp          2021-08-18 09:09   52K

Frame kernel updated too, but Ingenuity is still not there!
m2020_tp_ops210303_iau2000_v1.tf 2021-06-29 06:12  3.3K

Webgeocalc can be used to process the kernels, see also developers thread.

Offline FutureSpaceTourist

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Re: Perseverance, Mars 2020 Rover : Updates
« Reply #35 on: 09/03/2021 07:06 am »
https://twitter.com/nasapersevere/status/1433565831649107971

Quote
#SamplingMars update: first images show a sample in the tube after coring. But pics I took after an arm move are inconclusive due to poor lighting. I’m taking more photos in better light to confirm that we still have an intact core in the tube.

Read more: https://mars.nasa.gov/news/9027/nasas-perseverance-rover-successfully-cores-its-first-rock/

Online eeergo

Re: Perseverance, Mars 2020 Rover : Updates
« Reply #36 on: 09/03/2021 09:19 am »

Quote
#SamplingMars update: first images show a sample in the tube after coring. But pics I took after an arm move are inconclusive due to poor lighting. I’m taking more photos in better light to confirm that we still have an intact core in the tube.

Read more: https://mars.nasa.gov/news/9027/nasas-perseverance-rover-successfully-cores-its-first-rock/

Good image of the cored rock in the article:
-DaviD-

Offline FutureSpaceTourist

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Re: Perseverance, Mars 2020 Rover : Updates
« Reply #37 on: 09/05/2021 06:00 am »
https://twitter.com/nasapersevere/status/1434376252819841026

Quote
I’ve got it! With better lighting down the sample tube, you can see the rock core I collected is still in there. Up next, I’ll process this sample and seal the tube. #SamplingMars

Latest images: https://mars.nasa.gov/mars2020/multimedia/raw-images/


Online eeergo

Re: Perseverance, Mars 2020 Rover : Updates
« Reply #39 on: 09/07/2021 03:04 pm »
-DaviD-

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