Author Topic: biggest launchers in south america?  (Read 1828 times)

Offline Tom Schmidt

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biggest launchers in south america?
« on: 07/28/2020 09:50 am »
Hello,

do you know which country is the biggest launcher in middle and south america?

Offline Hobbes-22

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Re: biggest launchers in south america?
« Reply #1 on: 07/28/2020 04:01 pm »
French Guyana, by a large margin.  ;D

(cue the discussion of whether ESA's launch base in Kourou counts as "South American")
« Last Edit: 07/28/2020 04:02 pm by Hobbes-22 »

Online gongora

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Re: biggest launchers in south america?
« Reply #2 on: 07/28/2020 04:14 pm »
Hello,

do you know which country is the biggest launcher in middle and south america?

What do you mean by "launcher"?  No South or Central American country builds their own operational launch vehicles.  European rockets launch from French Guiana.  Many countries own satellites, and some like Argentina are making an effort to be able to build satellites.
« Last Edit: 07/28/2020 04:15 pm by gongora »

Offline Donosauro

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Re: biggest launchers in south america?
« Reply #3 on: 07/28/2020 04:30 pm »
Hello,

do you know which country is the biggest launcher in middle and south america?

What do you mean by "launcher"?  No South or Central American country builds their own operational launch vehicles.  European rockets launch from French Guiana.  Many countries own satellites, and some like Argentina are making an effort to be able to build satellites.

Brazil's space program: https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brazilian_space_program

Argentinian space activities: https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Comisión_Nacional_de_Actividades_Espaciales

Offline ace5

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Re: biggest launchers in south america?
« Reply #4 on: 07/29/2020 09:45 pm »
Brazilian VLS1- type rocket. Failed on 2 test flights and suffered a major pre-launch failure in 2003 that led to its demise.The VLS-1 had a take-off mass of 49.7 tons, height of 19.4 meters, and its first stage consisted of four S43 solid-propellant motors, similar to the first stage of Sonda IV sounding rocket, with simultaneous ignition. The second stage had only one S43 motor, and the first stage motors are attached  symmetrically.
In the third stage there is an S40 motor equipped with a vectored nozzle, control and equipment bays, while in the fourth stage the motor was an S44, developed especially for this purpose. It was made of composite material, using kevlar fiber and epoxy resin, had a fixed nozzle. This motor was of fundamental importance, as it was responsible for the last speed increase and for the injection of the satellite in orbit.
Even having achieved results in space technological development, with application both in Brazil and abroad, the country has not yet achieved full success in the objectives of the 'Complete Brazilian Space Mission'.
The VLS-1 made three incomplete launch attempts. The first one, carried out in 1997, was called Operation Brazil, whose objective was to verify the operation of the vehicle in flight and to place the SCD-2 satellite in orbit. The mission was interrupted within the first few seconds of flight. The failure of a Mechanical Safety Device (DMS), prevented one of the propellants of the first stage from igniting, which made it impossible to carry out the flight under normal conditions.
After investigations and design changes, in 1999 there was the Operation Almenara, whose purpose was to place the SACI-II satellite in orbit. In this operation, the vehicle successfully took off and performed the first phase of the flight (propulsion by the first stage) under normal conditions. However, after the second stage ignited, the vehicle exploded, thus ending the mission. In 2003, there was the worst tragedy in Brazilian space history: an untimely ignition of one of the first stage motors resulted in the destruction of the vehicle and the launch pad, and the death of 21 people from the technical team that worked there in final preparation activities. This was Operation São Luís, that had started in July 2002 with the preparation of the Operations Plan. The mission aimed to perform the third flight of the VLS-1, placing the SATEC satellite in orbit, but the accident ended the mission, three days before launch.
« Last Edit: 07/29/2020 09:49 pm by ace5 »

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