Author Topic: ispace (Japan) Lunar Landers (HAKUTO-R)  (Read 79912 times)

Offline Tywin

Re: ispace (Japan) Lunar Landers (HAKUTO-R)
« Reply #20 on: 07/29/2019 02:05 pm »
Really important contract for Ispace, with the agreement with ESA, and her Prospect, in the lander mission of Russian, with Luna 27   8)

Quote
“We’re very proud of Carlos, Abigail and Julien for this achievement and we know they are the optimal choice to serve ESA in this mission,” said Takeshi Hakamada, Founder & CEO of ispace. “Likewise, we’re honoured at ispace to play a role in the realisation of space resource utilisation in the very near future.”


Quote
“It’s a real privilege for our team to support ESA in this exciting endeavour,” said Julien-Alexandre Lamamy, ispace Europe’s Managing Director. “We hope that ispace Europe’s role in this mission will be an important factor in positioning ESA at the frontline of the space resources arena.”

https://spacewatch.global/2019/07/ispace-selected-by-european-space-agency-to-support-lunar-mission/
« Last Edit: 07/29/2019 02:07 pm by Tywin »
The knowledge is power...Everything is connected...
The Turtle continues at a steady pace ...

Online gongora

  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 10149
  • US
  • Liked: 13757
  • Likes Given: 5881
Re: ispace (Japan) Lunar Landers (HAKUTO-R)
« Reply #21 on: 08/22/2019 03:51 pm »
Mission Timeline Adjustment for the HAKUTO-R Program

TOKYO – August 22, 2019 – ispace, inc. (“ispace”), a lunar exploration company, announced an adjusted mission schedule for its HAKUTO-R program, a commercial lunar exploration program consisting of the company’s first two lunar missions. The schedule includes a lunar landing in 2021 for Mission 1, and a landing and deployment of a rover for surface exploration in 2023 for Mission 2.

In its initial mission schedule, ispace had planned a technology demonstration mission to send an orbiter around the Moon in 2020 for its first mission. The purpose of the mission was to test in-flight technology; there was no plan to carry customer payloads onboard and the module was not intended to perform a soft landing.

Moving forward, ispace will focus on completing a successful soft-landing mission, carrying customer payloads, by 2021. The decision to adjust the mission schedule is primarily in response to the dramatic market acceleration and increasing demand for lunar exploration around the world, including improving the company’s competitiveness for supporting contracts, such as for NASA’s Commercial Lunar Payload Services (CLPS) program, and similar opportunities taking form around the world.

NASA, which launched the CLPS program in 2018, selected 9 companies to participate in competitive bids totaling $2.6 billion over the next 10 years to carry scientific instruments to the lunar surface. Among those selected was Draper, an American not-for-profit company with a heritage in space exploration dating to the Apollo Moon landings. The Draper team includes ispace as a design agent and manager of lander mission operations in order to compete in the CLPS bids.

The opportunity to support Draper’s bids for the NASA CLPS program came after ispace’s initial planning to send an orbiter to the Moon by 2020. To increase its competitiveness and guarantee its ability to support NASA’s needs, as well as to meet the several other market demands developing worldwide, ispace decided to shift its resources to realize a successful landing mission in 2021.

As a result of eliminating the demonstration of technology mission (orbiter mission in 2020), it is necessary to mitigate risk and increase reliability for the 2021 landing mission. Additionally, to achieve the small and lightweight lander in this timeframe, it will require more time to overcome various hurdles and optimize structural and propulsion systems.

Moving forward, ispace will address the need for landing gear development within this new timeframe, as well as securing a contract with a ground station to operate the lunar lander from Earth, constructing a mission control center, and producing training and operation plans for the lander mission operations.

In order to maintain a leading role as a lunar development company, swift adaption to market growth and new business opportunities is required. ispace continues to grow and keep pace with the rapidly transforming lunar exploration industry. In August 2019, ispace has expanded to 100 staff across its 3 global offices. In July 2019, the company’s European office was selected by the European Space Agency to be part of the Science Team for PROSPECT, a program which seeks to extract water on the Moon. The company’s HAKUTO-R program has partnered with 6 leading Japanese companies.

■ ispace, inc. https://ispace-inc.com/

ispace, inc. (ispace) is a private lunar exploration company with a vision to extend human presence beyond Earth. The company has 100 staff from 13 different countries; operates in Japan (HQ), the United States and Europe; and has signed partnerships with the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) and the Government of Luxembourg. ispace raised nearly $95 million (USD) in Series A funding—the largest on record in Japan and more than almost any other space company in history. ispace also managed Team HAKUTO, one of the 5 finalists in the Google Lunar XPRIZE competition.

■ HAKUTO-R https://ispace-inc.com/hakuto-r/

HAKUTO-R is the world’s first commercial lunar exploration program. It includes ispace’s first two lunar missions: Mission 1, a soft lunar landing in 2021, and Mission 2, a lunar landing and deployment of a rover for lunar surface exploration in 2023. For both missions, ispace’s lander will be a secondary payload on SpaceX’s Falcon 9 rocket. The program is intended to lay the groundwork for a high-frequency, low-cost lunar transportation platform.

Offline Chris Bergin

Re: ispace (Japan) Lunar Landers (HAKUTO-R)
« Reply #22 on: 08/23/2019 03:19 pm »
ARTICLE: ispace alters Moon mission timelines for greater response to customer needs -

By Chris Gebhardt (@ChrisG_NSF)

https://www.nasaspaceflight.com/2019/08/ispace-moon-mission-timelines-greater-response-customer/

https://twitter.com/NASASpaceflight/status/1164920017420541953
Support NSF via L2 -- Help improve NSF -- Site Rules/Feedback/Updates
**Not a L2 member? Whitelist this forum in your adblocker to support the site and ensure full functionality.**

Offline FutureSpaceTourist

  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 47434
  • UK
    • Plan 28
  • Liked: 80290
  • Likes Given: 36328
Re: ispace (Japan) Lunar Landers (HAKUTO-R)
« Reply #23 on: 08/23/2019 07:06 pm »


Quote
ispace is a lunar exploration company with a vision to extend human presence to outer space. The company is developing a small commercial lunar lander and miniature lunar rovers to delivery customer payloads to the Moon and explore the lunar surface. ispace aims to be a vehicle for companies on Earth to access new business opportunities on the Moon and ultimately incorporate the Moon into Earth’s economic and living sphere. The company will land its first lander on the Moon in 2021 as part of its “HAKUTO-R” program—the world’s first commercial lunar exploration program. The missions for HAKUTO-R will launch on SpaceX’s Falcon 9 rocket.
 
ispace has operations in Japan, the United States, and Europe, and has signed partnerships with JAXA and the Government of Luxembourg. ispace was the managing company for Team HAKUTO, one of the 5 finalists in the Google Lunar XPRIZE competition.
 
For more information, visit http://www.ispace-inc.com/

Offline PM3

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1469
  • Germany
  • Liked: 1827
  • Likes Given: 1287
Re: ispace (Japan) Lunar Landers (HAKUTO-R)
« Reply #24 on: 08/23/2019 08:42 pm »
Note that iSpace develops two lunar landers: The Hakuto-R lander, which they build themselves and plan to launch on Falcon 9, and the Artemis-7 lander, which will be built by General Atomics and is sold as a CLPS lander to NASA by Draper. First Artemis-7 mission is called "AM-1". I wonder if they stick with that after NASA named the Artemis program ...

Japanese startup ispace is tapping Apollo-era expertise to build lunar landers for NASA - Loren Grush about the Artemis-7 project, October 2018

Artemis-7 Payload User's Guide with AM-1 mission profile (PDF)

The Artemis-7 lander in the Draper PUG actually looks similar to the Hakuto-R model, as shown in the video above and the attached photo (image source).
« Last Edit: 08/23/2019 08:51 pm by PM3 »
"Never, never be afraid of the truth." -- Jim Bridenstine

Offline FutureSpaceTourist

  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 47434
  • UK
    • Plan 28
  • Liked: 80290
  • Likes Given: 36328
Re: ispace (Japan) Lunar Landers (HAKUTO-R)
« Reply #25 on: 08/24/2019 12:17 pm »
twitter.com/hakuto_reboot_e/status/1165213990126882816

Quote
Our 3 new Corporate Partners were showcased in yesterday's morning edition of Asahi Shimbun, a leading newspaper in Japan and one of HAKUTO-R's Media Partners!😆

https://twitter.com/hakuto_reboot_e/status/1165214005675188224

Quote
via Asahi Shimbun

twitter.com/hakuto_reboot_e/status/1165214018891444224

Quote
Utilizing its know-how in making small and lightweight, but safe and reliable vehicles, Suzuki Motor Corp will contribute its expertise in structural analysis toward the development of the HAKUTO-R lunar lander...

https://twitter.com/hakuto_reboot_e/status/1165214026923593728

Quote
Citizen Watch will apply its Super Titanium™ material to the HAKUTO-R lunar lander and lunar rover. Citizen will procure titanium material and process it using its proprietary technology to make the titanium hard and durable...

twitter.com/hakuto_reboot_e/status/1165214036746596353

Quote
Sumitomo Corp celebrates its 100th anniversary this year and partners with HAKUTO-R as it looks toward  the next 100! Sumitomo will promote collaboration among various stakeholders to encourage growth in the lunar industry thru its new open innovation lab, Mirai Lab Palette...

https://twitter.com/hakuto_reboot_e/status/1165214045307191296

Quote
@ispace_inc also announced its adjusted mission schedule for the HAKUTO-R Program: Mission 1 will perform a soft landing on the Moon in 2021 and Mission 2 will land on the Moon and deploy a rover for exploration in 2023! 🚀

Offline FutureSpaceTourist

  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 47434
  • UK
    • Plan 28
  • Liked: 80290
  • Likes Given: 36328
Re: ispace (Japan) Lunar Landers (HAKUTO-R)
« Reply #26 on: 09/14/2019 07:30 am »
twitter.com/hakuto_reboot_e/status/1172739619785363456

Quote
We're making good progress! Last month, ispace's Avionics team, who look after the lander's electronic systems, successfully completed Thermal Vacuum Testing. The objective of the test is to verify thermal stability and if a unit will behave in space as predicted. (1/4)

https://twitter.com/hakuto_reboot_e/status/1172739631302922241

Quote
In the vacuum of space, heat cannot be removed by convection, in which heat rises, but instead, by radiation or by conduction, in which heat flows from a warmer object to a cooler object. We need to verify the lander electronic units are compatible in this environment. (2/4)

twitter.com/hakuto_reboot_e/status/1172739642803666945

Quote
In this test, the engineers put one of the lander's main computers and some interface boards in a sealed chamber which pumps out air to create a vacuum and then cycled between hot and cold temperatures. The units passed the test! (3/4)

https://twitter.com/hakuto_reboot_e/status/1172739646607855616

Quote
By creating a simulated space vacuum and testing under temperatures as they would be in space, we can make sure equipment will operate as it should before we launch the lander into space!🚀 (4/4)

Offline FutureSpaceTourist

  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 47434
  • UK
    • Plan 28
  • Liked: 80290
  • Likes Given: 36328
Re: ispace (Japan) Lunar Landers (HAKUTO-R)
« Reply #27 on: 11/16/2019 05:43 am »
https://twitter.com/hakuto_reboot_e/status/1195576866922328064

Quote
Last week, Takeshi Hakamada, Founder & CEO of @ispace_inc addressed an audience of 1,000+ at @WebSummit to share our company's vision to expand industry to the Moon and how several of HAKUTO-R's partners are taking those "first steps". Full video here:
« Last Edit: 11/16/2019 05:44 am by FutureSpaceTourist »

Offline FutureSpaceTourist

  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 47434
  • UK
    • Plan 28
  • Liked: 80290
  • Likes Given: 36328
Re: ispace (Japan) Lunar Landers (HAKUTO-R)
« Reply #28 on: 01/15/2020 02:44 pm »

Offline Phil Stooke

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1346
  • Canada
  • Liked: 1409
  • Likes Given: 1
Re: ispace (Japan) Lunar Landers (HAKUTO-R)
« Reply #29 on: 02/12/2020 10:04 pm »
Fans of ispace may like this abstract from the LPSC meeting to be held next month.

https://www.hou.usra.edu/meetings/lpsc2020/pdf/2175.pdf


Offline FutureSpaceTourist

  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 47434
  • UK
    • Plan 28
  • Liked: 80290
  • Likes Given: 36328
Re: ispace (Japan) Lunar Landers (HAKUTO-R)
« Reply #30 on: 07/31/2020 07:51 am »
Quote
Ispace reveals the final design of its lunar lander ahead of its first mission to the moon in 2022

Darrell Etherington
TechCrunch  July 30, 2020

Japanese new space startup ispace has revealed the final design of its HAKUTO-R lunar lander, a spacecraft set to make its first touchdown on the moon in 2022 if all goes to the updated plan (it had been set to fly in October 2021 until today).

https://finance.yahoo.com/news/ispace-reveals-final-design-lunar-121919998.html

Offline FutureSpaceTourist

  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 47434
  • UK
    • Plan 28
  • Liked: 80290
  • Likes Given: 36328
Re: ispace (Japan) Lunar Landers (HAKUTO-R)
« Reply #31 on: 07/31/2020 07:03 pm »
https://twitter.com/sciguyspace/status/1288834218185961474

Quote
Today ispace announced that its first mission to the Moon will now launch in 2022, still on a Falcon 9 rocket. The smaller spacecraft will still carry 30kg to the Moon but follow a longer, three-month track to get there. ArianeGroup will build propulsion system.

Offline FutureSpaceTourist

  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 47434
  • UK
    • Plan 28
  • Liked: 80290
  • Likes Given: 36328
Re: ispace (Japan) Lunar Landers (HAKUTO-R)
« Reply #32 on: 07/31/2020 07:06 pm »
Infographic attached


Offline Comga

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 6450
  • Liked: 4553
  • Likes Given: 5058
Re: ispace (Japan) Lunar Landers (HAKUTO-R)
« Reply #33 on: 08/01/2020 01:26 am »
Do the six peripheral “assist engines” appear to anyone else to be asymmetrically canted away from the center of mass?
What’s with that?

Frankly the “landing” looks like fairly simple CGI.
Not particularly inspiring

The recent Chinese lander used lidar for terminal guidance. Hope they published enough to establish the technology and “commoditization” it.
What kind of wastrels would dump a perfectly good booster in the ocean after just one use?

Offline yg1968

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 17209
  • Liked: 7067
  • Likes Given: 3045

Online zubenelgenubi

  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 11021
  • Arc to Arcturus, then Spike to Spica
  • Sometimes it feels like Trantor in the time of Hari Seldon
  • Liked: 7304
  • Likes Given: 70487
Re: ispace (Japan) Lunar Landers (HAKUTO-R)
« Reply #35 on: 08/01/2020 04:59 pm »
Program thread here--moved from Japanese Launchers to Space Science Coverage.

Launch thread is here.
« Last Edit: 08/01/2020 05:00 pm by zubenelgenubi »
Support your local planetarium! (COVID-panic and forward: Now more than ever.) My current avatar is saying "i wants to go uppies!" Yes, there are God-given rights. Do you wish to gainsay the Declaration of Independence?

Offline edzieba

  • Virtual Realist
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5988
  • United Kingdom
  • Liked: 9162
  • Likes Given: 38
Re: ispace (Japan) Lunar Landers (HAKUTO-R)
« Reply #36 on: 08/03/2020 11:54 am »
Do the six peripheral “assist engines” appear to anyone else to be asymmetrically canted away from the center of mass?
What’s with that?
Maximising thrust tangent to CoM to maximise rotational moment. Pointing the thrust axis through the CoM would provide zero rotational moment (zero control authority). Physical location is likely constrained by packaging concerns.

Offline Blackstar

  • Veteran
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 15207
  • Liked: 7660
  • Likes Given: 2

Offline Blackstar

  • Veteran
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 15207
  • Liked: 7660
  • Likes Given: 2
Re: ispace (Japan) Lunar Landers (HAKUTO-R)
« Reply #38 on: 08/13/2020 12:11 pm »
Does anybody know of a site that compares the dimensions and masses of the current crop of robotic lunar landers? I'm interested in the ones from Astrobotic, Intuitive Machines, and the Israeli and Indian ones.

I've seen an indication that the Surveyor lander was 3.5 meters in height, which makes it a lot higher than this ispace lander, although it's just a bit confusing.

Online Zed_Noir

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5430
  • Canada
  • Liked: 1792
  • Likes Given: 1292
Re: ispace (Japan) Lunar Landers (HAKUTO-R)
« Reply #39 on: 08/13/2020 08:39 pm »
Does anybody know of a site that compares the dimensions and masses of the current crop of robotic lunar landers? I'm interested in the ones from Astrobotic, Intuitive Machines, and the Israeli and Indian ones.

I've seen an indication that the Surveyor lander was 3.5 meters in height, which makes it a lot higher than this ispace lander, although it's just a bit confusing.

The Surveyer lander overall height is probably 3.5 meters. That is at the top of mast with the planar antenna fully elevated. The spacecraft chassis is about a meter high from the photos of astronauts standing next to it. So the HAKUTO-R appears to be twice as high as the Surveyer when comparing spacecraft chassis.


Tags:
 

Advertisement NovaTech
Advertisement Northrop Grumman
Advertisement
Advertisement Margaritaville Beach Resort South Padre Island
Advertisement Brady Kenniston
Advertisement NextSpaceflight
Advertisement Nathan Barker Photography
0