Author Topic: Equatorial Launch Australia  (Read 30633 times)

Offline Steven Pietrobon

  • Member
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 38583
  • Adelaide, Australia
    • Steven Pietrobon's Space Archive
  • Liked: 31756
  • Likes Given: 7744
Re: Equatorial Launch Australia
« Reply #40 on: 06/28/2022 05:56 am »
Here is the link to the livestream.

Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Offline CameronD

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2367
  • Melbourne, Australia
    • Norton Consultants
  • Liked: 864
  • Likes Given: 548
Re: Equatorial Launch Australia
« Reply #41 on: 07/03/2022 11:46 pm »
It seems that the latest (and presumably all) of ELA's NASA launches aren't out over the ocean to the east away from populated areas like everyone thought, but back into Aboriginal lands to the south-west!!!  :o :o

I mean, imagine if NASA just decided to lob sounding rockets from CC into the Florida swamps completely unannounced??

Understandably, this has a few locals rather upset:
Quote
NASA has overcome unusual challenges to collect all but one piece of the rocket launched from Arnhem Land on Monday morning, officials said.

Key points:
Aboriginal rangers helped NASA locate parts of its recently-launched rocket

A local MP has raised concerns about where parts of the rocket landed

The company that runs the launch pad has denied any safety issues

Pieces of the suborbital sounding rocket were tracked as far as 220 kilometres from the launch pad near Nhulunbuy, from where it blasted off in the early hours of Monday morning.

Yolngu rangers assisted with recovery efforts and said the mission headed into some tough terrain.

"We've got buffaloes and snakes around, you have to be careful," Djawa "Timmy" Burarrwanga, the managing director of Dhimurru Aboriginal Corporation, said.

Using a helicopter, NASA's advanced mapping technology and Yolngu tracking knowledge, Mr Burarrwanga said the group was able to recover most of the rocket's pieces.

.........

Yingiya Guyula, the independent member for Mulka, which covers the new Arnhem Space Centre where NASA is conducting launches, said he had "grave fears" about where the pieces of the rocket were ending up, including on Mimal land in central Arnhem Land.

"It was something that should've been looked at more carefully," Mr Guyula said.
https://www.abc.net.au/news/2022-07-03/nasa-rocket-recovery-arnhem-land-northern-territory/101203388
Quote
ELA's chief executive Michael Jones said NASA and ELA had undertaken risk assessments and probability studies on the dangers and had been cleared by Australia's regulatory authority.

Really!??!  And with the next one set to go tonight, I think there'd be a fair few who might disagree.. and that's not a good look for NASA, the ASA and rocket launch in general.  :-[



« Last Edit: 07/04/2022 05:17 am by CameronD »
With sufficient thrust, pigs fly just fine - however, this is not necessarily a good idea. It is hard to be sure where they are
going to land, and it could be dangerous sitting under them as they fly overhead.

Offline CameronD

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2367
  • Melbourne, Australia
    • Norton Consultants
  • Liked: 864
  • Likes Given: 548
Re: Equatorial Launch Australia
« Reply #42 on: 07/04/2022 05:08 am »
Equatorial Launch Australia, the owner and operator of Arnhem Space Centre, announced today’s scheduled launch of the NASA SISTINE mission has been delayed 24 hours due to the impact of the weather on the launch.

It is rescheduled for 8:24pm on Tuesday 5 July 2022. <- Local time

https://ela.space/sistine-launch-delayed-due-to-weather-conditions/
« Last Edit: 07/04/2022 05:09 am by CameronD »
With sufficient thrust, pigs fly just fine - however, this is not necessarily a good idea. It is hard to be sure where they are
going to land, and it could be dangerous sitting under them as they fly overhead.

Offline plugger.lockett

  • Full Member
  • *
  • Posts: 119
  • Perth, WA
  • Liked: 46
  • Likes Given: 8
Re: Equatorial Launch Australia
« Reply #43 on: 07/04/2022 07:57 am »
Quote
ELA's chief executive Michael Jones said NASA and ELA had undertaken risk assessments and probability studies on the dangers and had been cleared by Australia's regulatory authority.

Really!??!  And with the next one set to go tonight, I think there'd be a fair few who might disagree.. and that's not a good look for NASA, the ASA and rocket launch in general.  :-[

Interesting you didn't have this same objection when Gilmour popped their top in Central Queensland and spilled HTP everywhere. I guess concern for flying rockets only becomes a concern when they actually fly.

More seriously, Australia is one one the more heavily regulated and risk averse jurisdictions in the world. If ELA and NASA did risk assessments and they were approved by the relevant government regulator it seems fine?

Offline CameronD

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2367
  • Melbourne, Australia
    • Norton Consultants
  • Liked: 864
  • Likes Given: 548
Re: Equatorial Launch Australia
« Reply #44 on: 07/05/2022 12:21 am »
Quote
ELA's chief executive Michael Jones said NASA and ELA had undertaken risk assessments and probability studies on the dangers and had been cleared by Australia's regulatory authority.

Really!??!  And with the next one set to go tonight, I think there'd be a fair few who might disagree.. and that's not a good look for NASA, the ASA and rocket launch in general.  :-[

Interesting you didn't have this same objection when Gilmour popped their top in Central Queensland and spilled HTP everywhere. I guess concern for flying rockets only becomes a concern when they actually fly.

I must say I'm not sure I knew about that one, but yes, my concern has always been more for the safety of life and property under the flight path of some errant missile fragment than for somebody's toy rocket going up in smoke. Refer my sig.

From ABC News reports, it seems the best ELA thought to do in this particular case was get the local radio station to broadcast a warning in the local language beforehand.. as if everyone in the Territory just sits around listening to the radio all day long.  "Look out! The sky is falling!" ::)

More seriously, Australia is one one the more heavily regulated and risk averse jurisdictions in the world. If ELA and NASA did risk assessments and they were approved by the relevant government regulator it seems fine?

Maybe they were, maybe they weren't.  There's a rumour doing the rounds that someone at NASA might have got someone in the US Government to explain to our new rookie President Albanese just how important these launches were and that permits flowed rather quickly after that.. Of course, that's just a rumour and we'll never know for sure.  :-X
« Last Edit: 07/05/2022 05:42 am by CameronD »
With sufficient thrust, pigs fly just fine - however, this is not necessarily a good idea. It is hard to be sure where they are
going to land, and it could be dangerous sitting under them as they fly overhead.

Offline CameronD

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2367
  • Melbourne, Australia
    • Norton Consultants
  • Liked: 864
  • Likes Given: 548
Re: Equatorial Launch Australia
« Reply #45 on: 07/06/2022 11:59 pm »
Quote
NASA’s second ELA launch finally blasts off

NASA’s second mission with Equatorial Launch Australia surprisingly blasted off on Wednesday night after two previous delays.

ELA’s chief executive Michael Jones said, “Tonight we were delighted to achieve another successful launch which further strengthens the capabilities of our team and of the Arnhem Space Centre. 

“We look forward to our third launch on 12 July and then onwards to the future of the Arnhem Space Centre and the Australian space industry.”

https://www.spaceconnectonline.com.au/launch/5512-nasa-s-second-ela-launch-finally-blasts-off
« Last Edit: 07/06/2022 11:59 pm by CameronD »
With sufficient thrust, pigs fly just fine - however, this is not necessarily a good idea. It is hard to be sure where they are
going to land, and it could be dangerous sitting under them as they fly overhead.

Offline plugger.lockett

  • Full Member
  • *
  • Posts: 119
  • Perth, WA
  • Liked: 46
  • Likes Given: 8
Re: Equatorial Launch Australia
« Reply #46 on: 07/07/2022 01:09 am »
From ABC News reports, it seems the best ELA thought to do in this particular case was get the local radio station to broadcast a warning in the local language beforehand.. as if everyone in the Territory just sits around listening to the radio all day long.  "Look out! The sky is falling!" ::)
From the ABC article upthread.
"The NLC understands that ELA is engaging with Indigenous ranger groups across East Arnhem Land as part of the safety and retrieval processes in place for each launch," a spokesman said.
ELA said it has consulted with around 26 Northern Territory landowner groups and had also worked with local Indigenous broadcaster Yolngu Radio to get the message out in Yolngu Matha languages.
The company also said it had met with Mr Guyula to discuss his safety concerns before he spoke to the ABC.


Maybe they were, maybe they weren't.  There's a rumour doing the rounds that someone at NASA might have got someone in the US Government to explain to our new rookie President Albanese just how important these launches were and that permits flowed rather quickly after that.. Of course, that's just a rumour and we'll never know for sure.  :-X
Remember upthread when you were surprised that shipping containers were at the ELA launch site from Wallops? Everything would have been on the boat from Virginia before the federal election even took place. If you watched the feed from launch 1 you would have heard multiple SRP staff stating they had been working on this for roughly 10 years. You would have also heard ELA's CEO stating that they had filed for their launch license 2 years ago.

But sure, let's just make up some rumours at Albo's expense and pin this on him.

Offline CameronD

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2367
  • Melbourne, Australia
    • Norton Consultants
  • Liked: 864
  • Likes Given: 548
Re: Equatorial Launch Australia
« Reply #47 on: 07/08/2022 04:53 am »
Quote
NASA's second-ever commercial launch in Australia has taken off from the Northern Territory, with the US aeronautical giant hailing the moment as a landmark for science in the southern hemisphere.

A week of drizzling rain, wind and a 52-hour delay failed to stop the suborbital sounding rocket launch, which fired from the Arnhem Space Centre near Nhulunbuy around 11:15pm ACST on Wednesday.

With sufficient thrust, pigs fly just fine - however, this is not necessarily a good idea. It is hard to be sure where they are
going to land, and it could be dangerous sitting under them as they fly overhead.

Offline CameronD

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2367
  • Melbourne, Australia
    • Norton Consultants
  • Liked: 864
  • Likes Given: 548
Re: Equatorial Launch Australia
« Reply #48 on: 07/14/2022 07:25 am »
The third and final NASA mission, DEUCE, was launched earlier this week on July 11, the third launch in 15 days from the Arnhem Space Centre. The NASA DEUCE mission will help astronomers measure an unstudied part of Centauri A and B’s ultraviolet light spectrum, helping them model stars and understand their effects on planetary atmospheres.

Michael Jones, Executive Chairman and Group CEO of ELA, said the successful launch was a great finale to the NASA campaign that began on June 26.

“We are really proud to have achieved a very rare feat – three successful launches in just 15 days. Even more so given the challenging wind conditions,” Mr Jones said.

“We are also very pleased that the scientists involved with these launches are very happy with the results of the experiments,” Mr Jones added.

https://ela.space/ela-successfully-launches-3-rockets-in-15-days/
With sufficient thrust, pigs fly just fine - however, this is not necessarily a good idea. It is hard to be sure where they are
going to land, and it could be dangerous sitting under them as they fly overhead.

Offline plugger.lockett

  • Full Member
  • *
  • Posts: 119
  • Perth, WA
  • Liked: 46
  • Likes Given: 8
Re: Equatorial Launch Australia
« Reply #49 on: 10/10/2022 11:44 pm »
The NASA Sounding Rocket Program Quarterly Report was just released and covers the SRP campaign from the Northern Territory. PDF can be found here.

https://sites.wff.nasa.gov/code810/files/Rocket%20Report%203rd%20quarter%202022.pdf

Offline Steven Pietrobon

  • Member
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 38583
  • Adelaide, Australia
    • Steven Pietrobon's Space Archive
  • Liked: 31756
  • Likes Given: 7744
Re: Equatorial Launch Australia
« Reply #50 on: 12/21/2022 02:52 am »
How to shoot yourself in the foot.

"Equatorial Launch files cross-claim against former CEO

Equatorial Launch Australia (ELA) has lodged a claim in the Federal Court accusing its former CEO of digitally altering her employment contract."

https://www.spaceconnectonline.com.au/industry/5738-equatorial-launch-file-cross-claim-against-former-ceo
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Offline CameronD

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2367
  • Melbourne, Australia
    • Norton Consultants
  • Liked: 864
  • Likes Given: 548
Re: Equatorial Launch Australia
« Reply #51 on: 12/21/2022 11:39 pm »
How to shoot yourself in the foot.

"Equatorial Launch files cross-claim against former CEO

Equatorial Launch Australia (ELA) has lodged a claim in the Federal Court accusing its former CEO of digitally altering her employment contract."

https://www.spaceconnectonline.com.au/industry/5738-equatorial-launch-file-cross-claim-against-former-ceo

Ooo, nasty!
 
With sufficient thrust, pigs fly just fine - however, this is not necessarily a good idea. It is hard to be sure where they are
going to land, and it could be dangerous sitting under them as they fly overhead.

Offline plugger.lockett

  • Full Member
  • *
  • Posts: 119
  • Perth, WA
  • Liked: 46
  • Likes Given: 8

Offline CameronD

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2367
  • Melbourne, Australia
    • Norton Consultants
  • Liked: 864
  • Likes Given: 548
Re: Equatorial Launch Australia
« Reply #53 on: 01/23/2023 08:57 pm »
https://www.abc.net.au/news/2023-01-19/nt-equatorial-rocket-launch-2023-orbital-launch-arnhem-land/101868300
Quote
Last year's sub-orbital launches caused some consternation in Arnhem Land, after pieces of the rockets landed hundreds of kilometres down range of the space centre.

ELA has always maintained there was no safety risk to communities.

Yeah..  ::)
With sufficient thrust, pigs fly just fine - however, this is not necessarily a good idea. It is hard to be sure where they are
going to land, and it could be dangerous sitting under them as they fly overhead.

Offline plugger.lockett

  • Full Member
  • *
  • Posts: 119
  • Perth, WA
  • Liked: 46
  • Likes Given: 8
Re: Equatorial Launch Australia
« Reply #54 on: 01/24/2023 01:36 am »
Yeah..  ::)

Think of the children!

Offline plugger.lockett

  • Full Member
  • *
  • Posts: 119
  • Perth, WA
  • Liked: 46
  • Likes Given: 8
Re: Equatorial Launch Australia
« Reply #55 on: 04/27/2023 08:41 am »
https://www.abc.net.au/news/2023-04-27/arnhem-land-nt-missile-testing-possibility-raises-concern/102269398

I can understand local politician concerns, but

Quote
"Many people [have] raised concerns with me about the Space Centre being used by military," he said.

"Our concerns are that we may become a target if there is a foreign threat and our country is seen as expendable because we are in the middle of nowhere.

This quote very much reminds me of people in Broome, WA who decided it was too dangerous post 9/11 to stay in Broome. They believed bin Laden was going to attack the shipping terminal there so the moved 'more remote'. I wish I was making this up.

Offline Zed_Noir

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5426
  • Canada
  • Liked: 1790
  • Likes Given: 1289
Re: Equatorial Launch Australia
« Reply #56 on: 04/27/2023 04:55 pm »
https://www.abc.net.au/news/2023-04-27/arnhem-land-nt-missile-testing-possibility-raises-concern/102269398

I can understand local politician concerns, but

Quote
"Many people [have] raised concerns with me about the Space Centre being used by military," he said.

"Our concerns are that we may become a target if there is a foreign threat and our country is seen as expendable because we are in the middle of nowhere.

This quote very much reminds me of people in Broome, WA who decided it was too dangerous post 9/11 to stay in Broome. They believed bin Laden was going to attack the shipping terminal there so the moved 'more remote'. I wish I was making this up.
Any major transport hubs like airports, sea ports, rail yards and fuel installations plus major communication facilities are on the target list of hostile forces. However terrorists generally want targets that will bring them lots of media coverage, so not targets in the middle of nowhere.  Live with it.  ::)

Offline Steven Pietrobon

  • Member
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 38583
  • Adelaide, Australia
    • Steven Pietrobon's Space Archive
  • Liked: 31756
  • Likes Given: 7744
Re: Equatorial Launch Australia
« Reply #57 on: 04/28/2023 05:12 am »
https://ela.space/phantom-space-and-ela-anounce-mou/

Phantom Space Corporation and ELA expand scope of future equatorial orbit launches from ASC
by Cohen Creeper | Apr 20, 2023

Equatorial Launch Australia (ELA) the developer, owner and operator of the Arnhem Space Centre (ASC) on the Gove Peninsula in Australia’s Northern Territory,  having previously signed an undisclosed Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) with American space transportation and rocket manufacturing company Phantom Space Corporation in Sept 2022, is now working towards a multi-launch contract as well as expanding the scope and detail of future cooperation to develop mission profile and launch requirements for multiple launches from the ASC.

The scope expansion is both in the detail and conduct of Phantom’s planned launches from Australia, but also very ‘payload customer’ oriented with investigation into expansion of potential commercial and sovereign customers in the Asia Pacific region. In particular, the two companies will collaborate and investigate the generation and support of a space mission of national significance for Australia and the Asia Pacific region.

The announcement today at the 38th Space Symposium highlighted the intention of Phantom Space to expand its launch base options with a pure commercial and equatorial launch site through ELA. Phantom also plans to launch from both Vandenberg Space Force Base as well as Cape Canaveral Space Force Station.

ELA rose to prominence as an international multi-user commercial spaceport after successfully completing three commercial space launches with NASA over a 15-day period in mid in 2022. These launches were Australia’s first ever commercial launches as well as Australia’s first space launch in more than 25 years, as well as the first launches for NASA from a commercial spaceport.

The expanded scope of MOU will see Phantom work with ELA to execute both a multi-launch deal for commercial equatorial orbit launches from the ASC as a “resident launcher”, as well as both parties engaging with sovereign and commercial customers to develop and design orbital missions of national importance and significance. The timing of future launches will be dependent on the conclusion of a Technology Safeguards Agreement being signed between the United States and Australia which is currently being negotiated and is expected to be in place by early 2024.

ELA’s “resident launcher concept” would see Phantom occupy a customised version of ASC’s standard 1200sqm Horizontal Integration Facility (HIF) which has all the necessary infrastructure for long term residency, such as ISO8 clean rooms, over-head cranes, storage facilities, offices and workshops. Phantom would also launch from one of two ASC standard launch pads allocated to Phantom,  customised for Phantom’s unique requirements.

ELA is currently undertaking Phase 2 expansion of the Arnhem Space Centre with an additional 2200 acres being added adjacent to the existing licenced spaceport. The ASC Phase 2 expansion includes at least 14 new orbital pads (allocated two per launch complex), up to 7 HIF facilities, a fuel and gases facility including the production of Liquid Oxygen (LOX), space weather facilities and comprehensive launch, mission and range control facilities and extensive communications and tracking equipment.

The ASC is the only commercially owned and run, multi-user equatorial launch site in the world and is located 12 degrees south of the equator on the Gulf of Carpentaria, offering unique benefits for space launches. ASC is also unique as most spaceports are federal/government owned/operated facilities.

ELA and Phantom’s announcement is the first of several agreements ELA is expecting to announce in mid-2023 as it ramps up its operations following the success of the NASA missions.

Michael Jones, Executive Chairman and Group CEO of ELA said the agreement with Phantom was the next step forward for Australia’s space industry.

“We are delighted to announce this partnership with Phantom Space Corporation which has been developing for some time. We are really keen for Phantom to become a resident launcher and access our world-leading launch site at the Arnhem Space Centre to take Australia’s space industry to the next level,” said Mr Jones.

“We liked Phantom from the outset, their technology, commercial philosophy and quite frankly they have been a launch mentor for us from our first meeting. Their experience and knowledge is a clear standout in the small launcher market.

“Last year’s successful launches with NASA allowed us to showcase the skill and capabilities of both ELA and the ASC to the world. We’re excited to embark on that journey again, this time with Phantom Space Corporation.

“This announcement not only confirms ELA’s position at the forefront of global commercial space launch, it also confirms Australia as a partner for all companies looking to launch, particularly those that want the unique benefits the ASC provides.”

Mark Lester, COO of Phantom Space said, “Launch sites are akin to gates at an airport—it’s imperative to have a robust portfolio to meet customer needs.  Arnhem Space Centre fits perfectly into Phantom’s strategy as it broadens our direct access to new orbital regimes with a proven spaceport.  In addition to ASC’s unique geography, ELA’s success with NASA’s space launches and their ability to provide a full-service spaceport at low cost were key elements in selecting ASC as our next dedicated launch site. We look forward to continuing to work with the ELA team to provide assured access to space for our customers.”

Phantom’s CEO Jim Cantrell said, “Australia has been a great friend to the United States throughout the years and we at Phantom are proud to lead the way in utilizing this unique new launch complex from Australia.  We look forward to the success of this partnership in the great tradition of the history between the two countries.”
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Offline plugger.lockett

  • Full Member
  • *
  • Posts: 119
  • Perth, WA
  • Liked: 46
  • Likes Given: 8
Re: Equatorial Launch Australia
« Reply #58 on: 05/01/2023 11:49 pm »
Any major transport hubs like airports, sea ports, rail yards and fuel installations plus major communication facilities are on the target list of hostile forces. However terrorists generally want targets that will bring them lots of media coverage, so not targets in the middle of nowhere.  Live with it.  ::)

I, uh, take it you've never been to Broome then lol

Offline plugger.lockett

  • Full Member
  • *
  • Posts: 119
  • Perth, WA
  • Liked: 46
  • Likes Given: 8
Re: Equatorial Launch Australia
« Reply #59 on: 05/01/2023 11:51 pm »
More seriously, I'd expect the manufacturing centre would be the higher priority target when compared to the test range out in the middle of nowhere.

Tags:
 

Advertisement NovaTech
Advertisement Northrop Grumman
Advertisement
Advertisement Margaritaville Beach Resort South Padre Island
Advertisement Brady Kenniston
Advertisement NextSpaceflight
Advertisement Nathan Barker Photography
1