Author Topic: Equatorial Launch Australia  (Read 30244 times)

Offline Steven Pietrobon

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Equatorial Launch Australia
« on: 11/05/2017 05:32 am »
This company is attempting to set up a launch site in Arhnem land, Northern Territory, Australia. They just signed a lease with the traditional owners.

Traditional owners sign space base lease

A $236 million Australian space station in the NT's northeast Arnhem Land is one step closer with traditional owners finalising a 12-year land lease agreement.

http://www.news.com.au/national/breaking-news/traditional-owners-sign-space-base-lease/news-story/d9ee86b96717ad60d14f697b2fce5ef1

Here's their Facebook page.

https://www.facebook.com/equatoriallaunchaustralia/
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Offline Steven Pietrobon

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Re: Equatorial Launch Australia
« Reply #1 on: 02/07/2019 02:36 am »
"ELA secures US contract to support development of local launch industry
Stephen Kuper
07 February 2019

Equatorial Launch Australia (ELA) has announced the company’s first US-based customer, TriSept Corp, and will provide an efficient launch and recovery location in Australia."

https://www.spaceconnectonline.com.au/launch/3182-ela-secures-us-contract-to-support-development-of-local-launch-industry

Never heard of TriSept before. Here is their website

https://trisept.com/
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Offline CameronD

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Re: Equatorial Launch Australia
« Reply #2 on: 04/30/2019 04:17 am »
An interesting read in the news today: https://www.abc.net.au/news/2019-04-30/how-viable-is-plan-to-build-spaceport-remote-northern-territory/10970060

Quote
ELA chief executive Carley Scott told the ABC that the project remained on track, and that the firm was planning to potentially have a rocket in the air by this year's tropical dry season.

"We're looking to ideally have a small rocket launched this year, in 2019, and bring the community along for that journey," said Ms Scott, who would not yet reveal an exact timeframe for blast-off.

Quote
The chosen site's isolated location — a wide, bushy plateau not far from the site of the annual Garma Festival at Gulkula and about an hour's drive from Nhulunbuy — adds to its viability, Ms Scott said.

"You're actually looking at a region that has been really strongly benefitted by the history of mining as far as overcoming some of those hurdles that are associated with having a remote area," she said.

"You have a deep water port that's already there, a city-quality airport, the strong township of Nhulunbuy and nearby communities … you have some really important infrastructure that has already been established."

Quote
"There's a lease now in place for ELA to proceed," she said

« Last Edit: 04/30/2019 04:19 am by CameronD »
With sufficient thrust, pigs fly just fine - however, this is not necessarily a good idea. It is hard to be sure where they are
going to land, and it could be dangerous sitting under them as they fly overhead.

Offline CJ

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Re: Equatorial Launch Australia
« Reply #3 on: 05/01/2019 01:35 am »
An interesting read in the news today: https://www.abc.net.au/news/2019-04-30/how-viable-is-plan-to-build-spaceport-remote-northern-territory/10970060

Interesting, but perhaps not in a good way. This is one line that jumped out at me. (bolding mine).

Quote
At the heart of the Government's current aspiration is its support for a private industry project — a spaceport to launch suborbital satellites being built on Aboriginal-owned land in East Arnhem Land.

It's also worth noting that the launch site's orbital launch azimuths all overfly land. Indonesia to the north, PNG to the northeast, Cape York Peninsula to the east.

To me, this is smelling more and more like a boondoggle. 

Offline CameronD

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Re: Equatorial Launch Australia
« Reply #4 on: 05/01/2019 04:37 am »
Quote
At the heart of the Government's current aspiration is its support for a private industry project — a spaceport to launch suborbital satellites being built on Aboriginal-owned land in East Arnhem Land.

It's also worth noting that the launch site's orbital launch azimuths all overfly land. Indonesia to the north, PNG to the northeast, Cape York Peninsula to the east.

To me, this is smelling more and more like a boondoggle.

You might be right.. time will tell.  They claim to have enough clear distance downrange for it not to be a problem.  It also seems they have the (strong) backing of the NT Government against the (perhaps equally strong?) opposition of the Northern Land Council.  Can the government legally back a monopoly?  Who will win?  Does anyone have to win??  Nobody knows.
With sufficient thrust, pigs fly just fine - however, this is not necessarily a good idea. It is hard to be sure where they are
going to land, and it could be dangerous sitting under them as they fly overhead.

Offline Steven Pietrobon

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Re: Equatorial Launch Australia
« Reply #5 on: 05/02/2019 07:20 am »
I believe ELA already has launch contracts from NASA to fly four suborbital missions in May 2020. That's a good start. Cape York Peninsula is about 550 km to the east, being about 150 km wide at that point. A two stage orbital rocket launching east would have the first stage land about 350 km downrange, well before reaching land. There is a chance that the second stage could crash into the peninsula if something goes wrong at the wrong time. The overflight area is heavily forested with few population centres. A ground track that flies north of Weipa (Mission River) should be sufficiently safe.
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Offline CameronD

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Re: Equatorial Launch Australia
« Reply #6 on: 05/03/2019 01:03 am »
I believe ELA already has launch contracts from NASA to fly four suborbital missions in May 2020. That's a good start.

Is this the one you're referring to?  It's the only thing I can find on the FedBizOpps web site that appears even closely related:
https://www.fbo.gov/notices/9b36ca157a3aab58a59e9d7918e1db0b

If so, it doesn't seem to have been awarded yet, nor is there any indication I can see if/when it will be, even though this Page 9 of the following NT Government doc under “2020” does reference the “NASA Australian suborbital sounding rocket campaign – Arnhem Space Centre”:
https://business.nt.gov.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0006/657051/territory-space-industry.pdf

Perhaps NASA are giving assurances at government level?  ???

« Last Edit: 05/03/2019 03:49 am by CameronD »
With sufficient thrust, pigs fly just fine - however, this is not necessarily a good idea. It is hard to be sure where they are
going to land, and it could be dangerous sitting under them as they fly overhead.

Offline Steven Pietrobon

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Re: Equatorial Launch Australia
« Reply #7 on: 05/03/2019 05:56 am »
The launches are in the WFF Bluebook, although only three launches are listed now launching July/August 2020.
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Offline CameronD

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Re: Equatorial Launch Australia
« Reply #8 on: 05/03/2019 06:28 am »
The launches are in the WFF Bluebook, although only three launches are listed now launching July/August 2020.

Maybe I'm a bit confused, so please correct me if I'm wrong, but, "AUS -Woomera, Australia" in the WWF Bluebook attachment you posted (thank you, BTW - most interesting)..

Woomera isn't even in the same State, so what do those launches have to do with ELA?!?  ???
« Last Edit: 05/03/2019 06:31 am by CameronD »
With sufficient thrust, pigs fly just fine - however, this is not necessarily a good idea. It is hard to be sure where they are
going to land, and it could be dangerous sitting under them as they fly overhead.

Offline Steven Pietrobon

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Re: Equatorial Launch Australia
« Reply #9 on: 05/03/2019 07:19 am »
Woomera is no longer available as a launch site for civilian use since the RAAF took over the running of the Woomera prohibited area. They will only let their military friends use the site, which does not include NASA. Thus NASA is looking for alternatives. The Wallops Flight Facility (WFF) 2018 annual report says they are looking at two commercial sites in Australia. One of them is the Arnhem Space Centre in the Northern Territory. I'm not sure what the other one is.

https://sites.wff.nasa.gov/code810/download_archive.html

From page 52 of the 2018 report:
"Australia. The SRPO has been working for a number of years to solidify plans that would enable the astrophysics science community to have access to a launch range in the southern hemisphere that also offers up some of the capabilities of our routine launch range in White Sands, New Mexico – primarily telescope recovery. Early this year a campaign kickoff meeting was hosted at Wallops Flight Facility for all campaign and mission stakeholders. The campaign will consist of four telescope missions which are progressing through the design phase. In parallel, the program is preparing to evaluate and select from two commercial launch ranges, where the campaign will be executed. This will be NASA’s first ever use of a foreign commercial launch range which, while exciting for program also introduces unique challenges. The SRPO is working closely with the NASA Office of International and Interagency Relations (OIIR) to resolve these challenges in order to bring this new approach to fruition. Similar to the Norway GCI campaign, SRPO will be taking advantage of newly obtained systems including the Liquid Nitrogen Plant as well as two MML’s (a second MML build is in the works). Two launchers will be utilized for the campaign in order to minimize the teams time in the field. The launch window for the 4 missions is set to open in May 2020 and planned to span a 2 week period."
« Last Edit: 05/03/2019 07:43 am by Steven Pietrobon »
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Offline Steven Pietrobon

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Re: Equatorial Launch Australia
« Reply #10 on: 05/03/2019 07:37 am »
Here's a presentation saying that NASA visited the site in October 2016 and that a study was performed in 2017.
« Last Edit: 05/03/2019 07:39 am by Steven Pietrobon »
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Offline CameronD

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Re: Equatorial Launch Australia
« Reply #11 on: 05/03/2019 07:41 am »
Ok.. and yet the latest WFF Rocket Report says: "Planning for Australia 2020 is continuing. Recent changes reduces the number of launches to three, requiring only one launcher."

https://sites.wff.nasa.gov/code810/files/Rocket_Report_1st_quarter_2019.pdf

So that means just ELA then??  ???
With sufficient thrust, pigs fly just fine - however, this is not necessarily a good idea. It is hard to be sure where they are
going to land, and it could be dangerous sitting under them as they fly overhead.

Offline Steven Pietrobon

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Re: Equatorial Launch Australia
« Reply #12 on: 05/03/2019 07:46 am »
I think it means that NASA only needs to bring the equipment for a single launcher. I believe they were planning on bringing two launchers to a single site. It wouldn't make sense to try and launch from two different sites. It sounds difficult enough just to get one going!
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Offline CameronD

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Re: Equatorial Launch Australia
« Reply #13 on: 06/02/2019 11:51 pm »
Looks like ELA won NASA's "Australia 2020" gig!

Quote
NASA will launch commercial rockets from an Australian spaceport in the Northern Territory next year after an Australian startup secured a contract with the space agency.

NASA will work with Equatorial Launch Australia (ELA) to launch rockets into space from the startup's Arnhem Space Centre in 2020.

"It's a first for NASA and a first for Australia," said ELA chief executive Carley Scott. "NASA has never ever before contracted a commercial site to do a launch."
https://www.theage.com.au/business/small-business/world-first-startup-wins-nasa-deal-to-launch-rockets-from-australia-20190531-p51t8g.html

The picture in the news article shows Carley and Blake Nikolic (Black Sky Aerospace) with one of their rockets.  Other than Black Sky being a potential launch customer for ELA, I'm not too sure what (if anything) Black Sky have to do with the NASA deal.. maybe nothing?


EDIT:  Here's the FBO link: https://www.fbo.gov/notices/083b2f73932d263f5bba3cfedde3500d

« Last Edit: 06/04/2019 04:30 am by CameronD »
With sufficient thrust, pigs fly just fine - however, this is not necessarily a good idea. It is hard to be sure where they are
going to land, and it could be dangerous sitting under them as they fly overhead.

Offline plugger.lockett

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Re: Equatorial Launch Australia
« Reply #14 on: 06/04/2019 06:12 am »
"NASA will work with Equatorial Launch Australia (ELA) to launch rockets into space from the startup's Arnhem Space Centre in 2020."

https://www.smh.com.au/business/small-business/world-first-startup-wins-nasa-deal-to-launch-rockets-from-australia-20190531-p51t8g.html


Offline Steven Pietrobon

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Re: Equatorial Launch Australia
« Reply #15 on: 08/02/2019 04:37 am »
NASA Inspects Proposed NT Space Base
Max Blenkin
2 August 2019

NASA has conducted a site inspection of the area of the Northern Territory from which it plans to launch a series of sounding rockets.

https://www.spaceconnectonline.com.au/r-d/3609-nasa-inspects-proposed-nt-space-base
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Offline CameronD

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Re: Equatorial Launch Australia
« Reply #16 on: 08/04/2019 11:22 pm »
NASA Inspects Proposed NT Space Base
Max Blenkin
2 August 2019

NASA has conducted a site inspection of the area of the Northern Territory from which it plans to launch a series of sounding rockets.

https://www.spaceconnectonline.com.au/r-d/3609-nasa-inspects-proposed-nt-space-base

Quote
Gumatj chief executive Klaus Helms told the ABC he wanted to get started.

"We hope that within this year I'd like to be able to put the roads in and start a clearing, if all the applications come through," Helms said. He said the involvement of NASA helped move the space centre plan into reality.

"It needed a kickstart, and this is a very good kickstart to get it going," Helms said.

"If it goes ahead, we've got the building of the roads, the building of the infrastructure, we've got the delivery of water, the delivery of fuel, we've got communications, security; there's a multitude of jobs."

ELA chose this location for its launch site as it has significant advantages, including its remoteness and proximity to the equator, which takes advantage of the Earth’s rotation and allows greater launch payloads for less fuel.

While the NASA scientists visited the proposed ELA launch site, the main purpose of their visit was educational – to talk to local high school students about the booming space sector. Among schools visited was the Nhulunbuy High School, the closest to the new space base.

{sound of crickets chirping}
With sufficient thrust, pigs fly just fine - however, this is not necessarily a good idea. It is hard to be sure where they are
going to land, and it could be dangerous sitting under them as they fly overhead.

Offline CameronD

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Re: Equatorial Launch Australia
« Reply #17 on: 01/05/2020 09:27 pm »
Here's a plug for ELA from the Australian Strategic Policy Institute:

https://www.aspistrategist.org.au/northern-launch-site-could-transform-australias-role-in-space/


With sufficient thrust, pigs fly just fine - however, this is not necessarily a good idea. It is hard to be sure where they are
going to land, and it could be dangerous sitting under them as they fly overhead.

Offline CameronD

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Re: Equatorial Launch Australia
« Reply #18 on: 05/31/2020 11:47 pm »
Here's a couple of videos I came across, one old, one new:



With sufficient thrust, pigs fly just fine - however, this is not necessarily a good idea. It is hard to be sure where they are
going to land, and it could be dangerous sitting under them as they fly overhead.

Offline Steven Pietrobon

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Re: Equatorial Launch Australia
« Reply #19 on: 06/01/2020 10:17 am »
They plan on building three launch pads.
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Offline TrevorMonty

Re: Equatorial Launch Australia
« Reply #20 on: 06/01/2020 06:20 pm »
Smallsats and cubesats are mostly interested in SSO and other orbits but rarely equatorial as they aren't heading to GEO.  Sounding rockets can be launched from anywhere.

This is likely to be another spaceport that never launches anything to space.




Offline Steven Pietrobon

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Re: Equatorial Launch Australia
« Reply #21 on: 06/02/2020 05:22 am »
This is likely to be another spaceport that never launches anything to space.

That is not true. They will be launching three NASA sounding rockets in June/July next year (XQC, SISTINE and DEUCE). They were scheduled for this year, but have been delayed due to current events.
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Offline CameronD

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Re: Equatorial Launch Australia
« Reply #22 on: 10/09/2020 03:05 am »
Sounds like there is something happening up there in the wet, muddy, humid, far reaches of the Northern Territory, but I can't access the article from Linkedin:

Quote
Equatorial Launch Australia (ELA):  Great article by Mark Dunn, featuring the progress of Equatorial Launch Australia (ELA) and the #ArnhemSpaceCentre as the next stages of development are scheduled with foundations to be poured soon.

https://lnkd.in/gMZ36tb

Image features our CEO, Carley S., Djawa Yunupingu (Gumatj Corporation Board) and Blake Nikolic (Black Sky Aerospace CEO). Photography: #LJM Photography. Artwork by Dorothy Yunupingu of Djulpan (seven sisters).

The image is interesting.. maybe Black Sky are considering launching from up north??
« Last Edit: 10/09/2020 03:07 am by CameronD »
With sufficient thrust, pigs fly just fine - however, this is not necessarily a good idea. It is hard to be sure where they are
going to land, and it could be dangerous sitting under them as they fly overhead.

Offline Steven Pietrobon

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« Last Edit: 10/09/2020 07:19 am by Steven Pietrobon »
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Offline CameronD

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Re: Equatorial Launch Australia
« Reply #24 on: 01/26/2021 10:58 pm »
ELA's CEO Carley Scott has been awarded an Order of Australia Medal for her work in the space industry and the NT community.  Well done, Carley!

https://www.abc.net.au/news/2021-01-26/order-of-australia-awards-northern-territory/13088470
With sufficient thrust, pigs fly just fine - however, this is not necessarily a good idea. It is hard to be sure where they are
going to land, and it could be dangerous sitting under them as they fly overhead.

Offline CameronD

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Re: Equatorial Launch Australia
« Reply #25 on: 10/15/2021 06:00 am »
After months of nothing, it looks like ELA might be starting to do something!

From LinkedIn: Launch rail affixed and looking good.
With sufficient thrust, pigs fly just fine - however, this is not necessarily a good idea. It is hard to be sure where they are
going to land, and it could be dangerous sitting under them as they fly overhead.

Offline Rik ISS-fan

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Re: Equatorial Launch Australia
« Reply #26 on: 10/15/2021 07:43 pm »
Isn't that a (NASA) NSROC MML (Medium Mobile Launcher)!?
According to the NASA Bluebook 2021 there are three launches planned; all 36. BlackBrand IX (Terrier - BlackBrand)
XQC - 06/27/22
SISTINE - 07/05/22
DEUCE - 07/15/22

Offline CameronD

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Re: Equatorial Launch Australia
« Reply #27 on: 10/18/2021 12:37 am »
Isn't that a (NASA) NSROC MML (Medium Mobile Launcher)!?
According to the NASA Bluebook 2021 there are three launches planned; all 36. BlackBrand IX (Terrier - BlackBrand)
XQC - 06/27/22
SISTINE - 07/05/22
DEUCE - 07/15/22

Looks like it..  The project was on ABC News over here on Friday night and seemed to indicate that a team of NASA people flew in a few months back to put in all of the infrastructure for their upcoming sounding rocket launches.  Bearing in mind that these are all solid-motor rockets, all ELA have provided is the dirt and perhaps the slab - so at this stage it's closest comparison in Australia would be Southern Launch's Koonibba Test Range.

No word yet on the progress of approvals to launch, but given that Enrico Palermo (ASA) was also interviewed on-site, I'd guess that's coming soon.


« Last Edit: 10/18/2021 12:42 am by CameronD »
With sufficient thrust, pigs fly just fine - however, this is not necessarily a good idea. It is hard to be sure where they are
going to land, and it could be dangerous sitting under them as they fly overhead.

Offline Steven Pietrobon

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Re: Equatorial Launch Australia
« Reply #28 on: 10/18/2021 05:05 am »
Some screen grabs.
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Offline CameronD

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Re: Equatorial Launch Australia
« Reply #29 on: 04/29/2022 02:15 am »
Okay, so it's been a while, but after a few months delays untangling red tape, it sounds like the ELA/NASA team are making progress.

From LinkedIn:
Quote
It was great to speak with Camden Smith and the NT News about Australia’s upcoming first commercial launch into space from ELA’s Arnhem Space Centre.
 
The ELA team is working around the clock on the final approvals and mission planning as we ready the site to welcome NASA and their BBIX rocket and prepare for the first launch in June.
 
We’re delighted to be able to share this launch with the local community in Nhulunbuy and have the support of the local Traditional Owners and the NT Government as we work towards our goal of pre-eminent multi-user commercial Space Launch company.
Quote
The night Launch of NASA's BBIX rocket in June 2022 from ELA's Arnhem Space Centre is coming...soon! This will be Australia's first commercial space launch and the first ever NASA launch from a commercial spaceport. Three launches are planned over a six-week period in June/July 2022 with rockets going to over 250km (250-310km) into space and collecting images and spectral data on alpha centauri (4.56 m light years from the sun) and other space atmospheric phenomenon. Big shout out to the ELA team working round the clock with Australian Space Agency to finalise approvals and mission planning with NASA. Extremely proud to be part of this real space company!

Unfortunately the NTNews article is paywalled, but here's the link if anyone is interested:
https://www.ntnews.com.au/business/nt-business/arnhem-land-space-launch-draws-closer/news-story/66d76fb7c38df41947965c3d65282367
« Last Edit: 04/29/2022 02:19 am by CameronD »
With sufficient thrust, pigs fly just fine - however, this is not necessarily a good idea. It is hard to be sure where they are
going to land, and it could be dangerous sitting under them as they fly overhead.

Offline plugger.lockett

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Offline Steven Pietrobon

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Re: Equatorial Launch Australia
« Reply #31 on: 06/24/2022 04:06 am »
ELA have a countdown clock to their first NASA launch. I calculate launch to be on Sunday 26 June at 13:14 UTC.

https://ela.space/
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Offline CameronD

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Re: Equatorial Launch Australia
« Reply #32 on: 06/24/2022 07:17 am »
ELA have a countdown clock to their first NASA launch. I calculate launch to be on Sunday 26 June at 13:14 UTC.

https://ela.space/

Ooo! So they have their launch license and didn't tell anyone?!? That's news.
https://ablis.business.gov.au/service/ag/launch-facility-licence/11

I guess we'll see what happens once the clock strikes zero.  Maybe that's when we'll see the paperwork fly?  .. although around midnight on a Sunday in the NT, I doubt anything much happens at all (sssh, you'll wake the neighbours!).

I suspect it's, at best, the opening of their agreed launch window that closes on July 12.
 
« Last Edit: 06/24/2022 07:34 am by CameronD »
With sufficient thrust, pigs fly just fine - however, this is not necessarily a good idea. It is hard to be sure where they are
going to land, and it could be dangerous sitting under them as they fly overhead.

Offline Yiosie

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Re: Equatorial Launch Australia
« Reply #33 on: 06/24/2022 07:58 am »
ELA have a countdown clock to their first NASA launch. I calculate launch to be on Sunday 26 June at 13:14 UTC.

https://ela.space/

No need for calculations; the launch times for all three launches are listed in NASA's Wallops Launch Schedule:

https://www.nasa.gov/wallops-launch-schedule

Quote
Mission: XQC
Vehicle: Black Brant IX sounding rocket
Date: June 26, 2022
Time: 9:14 a.m. EDT (10:44 p.m. ACST) [13:14 UTC]
Location: Arnhem Space Center, Australia

Mission: SISTINE
Vehicle: Black Brant IX sounding rocket
Date: July 4, 2022
Time: 6:54 a.m. EDT (8:24 p.m. ACST) [10:54 UTC]
Location: Arnhem Space Center, Australia

Mission: DEUCE
Vehicle: Black Brant IX sounding rocket
Date: July 12, 2022
Time: 6:57 a.m. EDT (8:27 p.m. ACST) [10:57 UTC]
Location: Arnhem Space Center, Australia

Offline Fmedici

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Re: Equatorial Launch Australia
« Reply #34 on: 06/24/2022 12:01 pm »
At least the first one of those launches is gonna be streamed on ELA YouTube channel according to what they said during today's webcast for the RockOn suborbital launch

Offline Steven Pietrobon

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Re: Equatorial Launch Australia
« Reply #35 on: 06/25/2022 06:46 am »
Here's the ELA YouTube page, which was created in 21 June 2022.

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCh6LMrzab8-v9OH14D-IHjg/featured
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Offline plugger.lockett

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Re: Equatorial Launch Australia
« Reply #36 on: 06/26/2022 11:47 pm »
So good to see a successful space launch from Australia after all of these years!!!

Really looking forward to the next two launches from the NASA SRP.

« Last Edit: 06/26/2022 11:49 pm by plugger.lockett »

Offline CameronD

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Re: Equatorial Launch Australia
« Reply #37 on: 06/27/2022 02:35 am »
Here's a few snippets from the local news write-up on last nights's launch:
Quote
The rocket launched from the Arnhem Space Centre near Nhulunbuy, on the lands of the Gumatj people who were consulted throughout the process. Weather conditions delayed the launch for about an hour as wind, rain and clouds arrived at the launch site.

“We had a few delays because of the weather but when it finally went you feel the shock of the rocket as it left and the noise was pretty impressive,” Arnhem Space Centre CEO Michael Jones told the Today Show on Monday morning.

“We went through the full weather spectrum last night we had heavy rain and cloud”“It would put some risk into what the launch angles will be so we just had to make sure it was safe.”

The rocket finally launched from the red dirt just after midnight on Monday, but was only visible for ten seconds before it disappeared into the earth’s atmosphere.

Around 100 VIPs watched the historic moment from a viewing platform 800 metres away including scientists, politicians, local community members, indigenous leaders and the media.

It is a 13m “sounding rocket” which will carry an atmospheric observation platform to examine the Alpha A and B constellations. The rocket is expected to travel 300 km during the 15 minutes it moves through space.

“Without getting too deep into the science, it was effectively a large X-ray camera looking at various astrological phenomenon and trying to capture parts of boulders in the Milky Way and particularly the star cluster of Alpha Centauri.”
https://www.news.com.au/technology/science/space/nasa-to-launch-rocket-in-australia-tonight-in-landmark-first/news-story/9d3ac8f7c798efc122cad1bb31e357f0
https://www.abc.net.au/news/2022-06-27/nasa-launch-rocket-arnhem-land-success/101183776

1. I know Blake Nicolic (BSA) was invited up to watch.
2. Interesting that that container came all the way from Wallops.
« Last Edit: 06/27/2022 02:45 am by CameronD »
With sufficient thrust, pigs fly just fine - however, this is not necessarily a good idea. It is hard to be sure where they are
going to land, and it could be dangerous sitting under them as they fly overhead.

Offline TrevorMonty

Re: Equatorial Launch Australia
« Reply #38 on: 06/27/2022 04:44 pm »
Here is info on Canadian suborbital launch vehicles.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Black_Brant_(rocket)
« Last Edit: 06/28/2022 01:18 am by zubenelgenubi »

Offline plugger.lockett

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Re: Equatorial Launch Australia
« Reply #39 on: 06/28/2022 12:02 am »
1. I know Blake Nicolic (BSA) was invited up to watch.
2. Interesting that that container came all the way from Wallops.

Yep, Blake was there. And I would expect many a container has arrived from Wallops. It's a NASA SRP launch campaign and that's where the SRPO is located.

Offline Steven Pietrobon

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Re: Equatorial Launch Australia
« Reply #40 on: 06/28/2022 05:56 am »
Here is the link to the livestream.

Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

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Re: Equatorial Launch Australia
« Reply #41 on: 07/03/2022 11:46 pm »
It seems that the latest (and presumably all) of ELA's NASA launches aren't out over the ocean to the east away from populated areas like everyone thought, but back into Aboriginal lands to the south-west!!!  :o :o

I mean, imagine if NASA just decided to lob sounding rockets from CC into the Florida swamps completely unannounced??

Understandably, this has a few locals rather upset:
Quote
NASA has overcome unusual challenges to collect all but one piece of the rocket launched from Arnhem Land on Monday morning, officials said.

Key points:
Aboriginal rangers helped NASA locate parts of its recently-launched rocket

A local MP has raised concerns about where parts of the rocket landed

The company that runs the launch pad has denied any safety issues

Pieces of the suborbital sounding rocket were tracked as far as 220 kilometres from the launch pad near Nhulunbuy, from where it blasted off in the early hours of Monday morning.

Yolngu rangers assisted with recovery efforts and said the mission headed into some tough terrain.

"We've got buffaloes and snakes around, you have to be careful," Djawa "Timmy" Burarrwanga, the managing director of Dhimurru Aboriginal Corporation, said.

Using a helicopter, NASA's advanced mapping technology and Yolngu tracking knowledge, Mr Burarrwanga said the group was able to recover most of the rocket's pieces.

.........

Yingiya Guyula, the independent member for Mulka, which covers the new Arnhem Space Centre where NASA is conducting launches, said he had "grave fears" about where the pieces of the rocket were ending up, including on Mimal land in central Arnhem Land.

"It was something that should've been looked at more carefully," Mr Guyula said.
https://www.abc.net.au/news/2022-07-03/nasa-rocket-recovery-arnhem-land-northern-territory/101203388
Quote
ELA's chief executive Michael Jones said NASA and ELA had undertaken risk assessments and probability studies on the dangers and had been cleared by Australia's regulatory authority.

Really!??!  And with the next one set to go tonight, I think there'd be a fair few who might disagree.. and that's not a good look for NASA, the ASA and rocket launch in general.  :-[



« Last Edit: 07/04/2022 05:17 am by CameronD »
With sufficient thrust, pigs fly just fine - however, this is not necessarily a good idea. It is hard to be sure where they are
going to land, and it could be dangerous sitting under them as they fly overhead.

Offline CameronD

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Re: Equatorial Launch Australia
« Reply #42 on: 07/04/2022 05:08 am »
Equatorial Launch Australia, the owner and operator of Arnhem Space Centre, announced today’s scheduled launch of the NASA SISTINE mission has been delayed 24 hours due to the impact of the weather on the launch.

It is rescheduled for 8:24pm on Tuesday 5 July 2022. <- Local time

https://ela.space/sistine-launch-delayed-due-to-weather-conditions/
« Last Edit: 07/04/2022 05:09 am by CameronD »
With sufficient thrust, pigs fly just fine - however, this is not necessarily a good idea. It is hard to be sure where they are
going to land, and it could be dangerous sitting under them as they fly overhead.

Offline plugger.lockett

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Re: Equatorial Launch Australia
« Reply #43 on: 07/04/2022 07:57 am »
Quote
ELA's chief executive Michael Jones said NASA and ELA had undertaken risk assessments and probability studies on the dangers and had been cleared by Australia's regulatory authority.

Really!??!  And with the next one set to go tonight, I think there'd be a fair few who might disagree.. and that's not a good look for NASA, the ASA and rocket launch in general.  :-[

Interesting you didn't have this same objection when Gilmour popped their top in Central Queensland and spilled HTP everywhere. I guess concern for flying rockets only becomes a concern when they actually fly.

More seriously, Australia is one one the more heavily regulated and risk averse jurisdictions in the world. If ELA and NASA did risk assessments and they were approved by the relevant government regulator it seems fine?

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Re: Equatorial Launch Australia
« Reply #44 on: 07/05/2022 12:21 am »
Quote
ELA's chief executive Michael Jones said NASA and ELA had undertaken risk assessments and probability studies on the dangers and had been cleared by Australia's regulatory authority.

Really!??!  And with the next one set to go tonight, I think there'd be a fair few who might disagree.. and that's not a good look for NASA, the ASA and rocket launch in general.  :-[

Interesting you didn't have this same objection when Gilmour popped their top in Central Queensland and spilled HTP everywhere. I guess concern for flying rockets only becomes a concern when they actually fly.

I must say I'm not sure I knew about that one, but yes, my concern has always been more for the safety of life and property under the flight path of some errant missile fragment than for somebody's toy rocket going up in smoke. Refer my sig.

From ABC News reports, it seems the best ELA thought to do in this particular case was get the local radio station to broadcast a warning in the local language beforehand.. as if everyone in the Territory just sits around listening to the radio all day long.  "Look out! The sky is falling!" ::)

More seriously, Australia is one one the more heavily regulated and risk averse jurisdictions in the world. If ELA and NASA did risk assessments and they were approved by the relevant government regulator it seems fine?

Maybe they were, maybe they weren't.  There's a rumour doing the rounds that someone at NASA might have got someone in the US Government to explain to our new rookie President Albanese just how important these launches were and that permits flowed rather quickly after that.. Of course, that's just a rumour and we'll never know for sure.  :-X
« Last Edit: 07/05/2022 05:42 am by CameronD »
With sufficient thrust, pigs fly just fine - however, this is not necessarily a good idea. It is hard to be sure where they are
going to land, and it could be dangerous sitting under them as they fly overhead.

Offline CameronD

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Re: Equatorial Launch Australia
« Reply #45 on: 07/06/2022 11:59 pm »
Quote
NASA’s second ELA launch finally blasts off

NASA’s second mission with Equatorial Launch Australia surprisingly blasted off on Wednesday night after two previous delays.

ELA’s chief executive Michael Jones said, “Tonight we were delighted to achieve another successful launch which further strengthens the capabilities of our team and of the Arnhem Space Centre. 

“We look forward to our third launch on 12 July and then onwards to the future of the Arnhem Space Centre and the Australian space industry.”

https://www.spaceconnectonline.com.au/launch/5512-nasa-s-second-ela-launch-finally-blasts-off
« Last Edit: 07/06/2022 11:59 pm by CameronD »
With sufficient thrust, pigs fly just fine - however, this is not necessarily a good idea. It is hard to be sure where they are
going to land, and it could be dangerous sitting under them as they fly overhead.

Offline plugger.lockett

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Re: Equatorial Launch Australia
« Reply #46 on: 07/07/2022 01:09 am »
From ABC News reports, it seems the best ELA thought to do in this particular case was get the local radio station to broadcast a warning in the local language beforehand.. as if everyone in the Territory just sits around listening to the radio all day long.  "Look out! The sky is falling!" ::)
From the ABC article upthread.
"The NLC understands that ELA is engaging with Indigenous ranger groups across East Arnhem Land as part of the safety and retrieval processes in place for each launch," a spokesman said.
ELA said it has consulted with around 26 Northern Territory landowner groups and had also worked with local Indigenous broadcaster Yolngu Radio to get the message out in Yolngu Matha languages.
The company also said it had met with Mr Guyula to discuss his safety concerns before he spoke to the ABC.


Maybe they were, maybe they weren't.  There's a rumour doing the rounds that someone at NASA might have got someone in the US Government to explain to our new rookie President Albanese just how important these launches were and that permits flowed rather quickly after that.. Of course, that's just a rumour and we'll never know for sure.  :-X
Remember upthread when you were surprised that shipping containers were at the ELA launch site from Wallops? Everything would have been on the boat from Virginia before the federal election even took place. If you watched the feed from launch 1 you would have heard multiple SRP staff stating they had been working on this for roughly 10 years. You would have also heard ELA's CEO stating that they had filed for their launch license 2 years ago.

But sure, let's just make up some rumours at Albo's expense and pin this on him.

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Re: Equatorial Launch Australia
« Reply #47 on: 07/08/2022 04:53 am »
Quote
NASA's second-ever commercial launch in Australia has taken off from the Northern Territory, with the US aeronautical giant hailing the moment as a landmark for science in the southern hemisphere.

A week of drizzling rain, wind and a 52-hour delay failed to stop the suborbital sounding rocket launch, which fired from the Arnhem Space Centre near Nhulunbuy around 11:15pm ACST on Wednesday.

With sufficient thrust, pigs fly just fine - however, this is not necessarily a good idea. It is hard to be sure where they are
going to land, and it could be dangerous sitting under them as they fly overhead.

Offline CameronD

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Re: Equatorial Launch Australia
« Reply #48 on: 07/14/2022 07:25 am »
The third and final NASA mission, DEUCE, was launched earlier this week on July 11, the third launch in 15 days from the Arnhem Space Centre. The NASA DEUCE mission will help astronomers measure an unstudied part of Centauri A and B’s ultraviolet light spectrum, helping them model stars and understand their effects on planetary atmospheres.

Michael Jones, Executive Chairman and Group CEO of ELA, said the successful launch was a great finale to the NASA campaign that began on June 26.

“We are really proud to have achieved a very rare feat – three successful launches in just 15 days. Even more so given the challenging wind conditions,” Mr Jones said.

“We are also very pleased that the scientists involved with these launches are very happy with the results of the experiments,” Mr Jones added.

https://ela.space/ela-successfully-launches-3-rockets-in-15-days/
With sufficient thrust, pigs fly just fine - however, this is not necessarily a good idea. It is hard to be sure where they are
going to land, and it could be dangerous sitting under them as they fly overhead.

Offline plugger.lockett

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Re: Equatorial Launch Australia
« Reply #49 on: 10/10/2022 11:44 pm »
The NASA Sounding Rocket Program Quarterly Report was just released and covers the SRP campaign from the Northern Territory. PDF can be found here.

https://sites.wff.nasa.gov/code810/files/Rocket%20Report%203rd%20quarter%202022.pdf

Offline Steven Pietrobon

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Re: Equatorial Launch Australia
« Reply #50 on: 12/21/2022 02:52 am »
How to shoot yourself in the foot.

"Equatorial Launch files cross-claim against former CEO

Equatorial Launch Australia (ELA) has lodged a claim in the Federal Court accusing its former CEO of digitally altering her employment contract."

https://www.spaceconnectonline.com.au/industry/5738-equatorial-launch-file-cross-claim-against-former-ceo
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Offline CameronD

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Re: Equatorial Launch Australia
« Reply #51 on: 12/21/2022 11:39 pm »
How to shoot yourself in the foot.

"Equatorial Launch files cross-claim against former CEO

Equatorial Launch Australia (ELA) has lodged a claim in the Federal Court accusing its former CEO of digitally altering her employment contract."

https://www.spaceconnectonline.com.au/industry/5738-equatorial-launch-file-cross-claim-against-former-ceo

Ooo, nasty!
 
With sufficient thrust, pigs fly just fine - however, this is not necessarily a good idea. It is hard to be sure where they are
going to land, and it could be dangerous sitting under them as they fly overhead.

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Re: Equatorial Launch Australia
« Reply #53 on: 01/23/2023 08:57 pm »
https://www.abc.net.au/news/2023-01-19/nt-equatorial-rocket-launch-2023-orbital-launch-arnhem-land/101868300
Quote
Last year's sub-orbital launches caused some consternation in Arnhem Land, after pieces of the rockets landed hundreds of kilometres down range of the space centre.

ELA has always maintained there was no safety risk to communities.

Yeah..  ::)
With sufficient thrust, pigs fly just fine - however, this is not necessarily a good idea. It is hard to be sure where they are
going to land, and it could be dangerous sitting under them as they fly overhead.

Offline plugger.lockett

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Re: Equatorial Launch Australia
« Reply #54 on: 01/24/2023 01:36 am »
Yeah..  ::)

Think of the children!

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Re: Equatorial Launch Australia
« Reply #55 on: 04/27/2023 08:41 am »
https://www.abc.net.au/news/2023-04-27/arnhem-land-nt-missile-testing-possibility-raises-concern/102269398

I can understand local politician concerns, but

Quote
"Many people [have] raised concerns with me about the Space Centre being used by military," he said.

"Our concerns are that we may become a target if there is a foreign threat and our country is seen as expendable because we are in the middle of nowhere.

This quote very much reminds me of people in Broome, WA who decided it was too dangerous post 9/11 to stay in Broome. They believed bin Laden was going to attack the shipping terminal there so the moved 'more remote'. I wish I was making this up.

Online Zed_Noir

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Re: Equatorial Launch Australia
« Reply #56 on: 04/27/2023 04:55 pm »
https://www.abc.net.au/news/2023-04-27/arnhem-land-nt-missile-testing-possibility-raises-concern/102269398

I can understand local politician concerns, but

Quote
"Many people [have] raised concerns with me about the Space Centre being used by military," he said.

"Our concerns are that we may become a target if there is a foreign threat and our country is seen as expendable because we are in the middle of nowhere.

This quote very much reminds me of people in Broome, WA who decided it was too dangerous post 9/11 to stay in Broome. They believed bin Laden was going to attack the shipping terminal there so the moved 'more remote'. I wish I was making this up.
Any major transport hubs like airports, sea ports, rail yards and fuel installations plus major communication facilities are on the target list of hostile forces. However terrorists generally want targets that will bring them lots of media coverage, so not targets in the middle of nowhere.  Live with it.  ::)

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Re: Equatorial Launch Australia
« Reply #57 on: 04/28/2023 05:12 am »
https://ela.space/phantom-space-and-ela-anounce-mou/

Phantom Space Corporation and ELA expand scope of future equatorial orbit launches from ASC
by Cohen Creeper | Apr 20, 2023

Equatorial Launch Australia (ELA) the developer, owner and operator of the Arnhem Space Centre (ASC) on the Gove Peninsula in Australia’s Northern Territory,  having previously signed an undisclosed Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) with American space transportation and rocket manufacturing company Phantom Space Corporation in Sept 2022, is now working towards a multi-launch contract as well as expanding the scope and detail of future cooperation to develop mission profile and launch requirements for multiple launches from the ASC.

The scope expansion is both in the detail and conduct of Phantom’s planned launches from Australia, but also very ‘payload customer’ oriented with investigation into expansion of potential commercial and sovereign customers in the Asia Pacific region. In particular, the two companies will collaborate and investigate the generation and support of a space mission of national significance for Australia and the Asia Pacific region.

The announcement today at the 38th Space Symposium highlighted the intention of Phantom Space to expand its launch base options with a pure commercial and equatorial launch site through ELA. Phantom also plans to launch from both Vandenberg Space Force Base as well as Cape Canaveral Space Force Station.

ELA rose to prominence as an international multi-user commercial spaceport after successfully completing three commercial space launches with NASA over a 15-day period in mid in 2022. These launches were Australia’s first ever commercial launches as well as Australia’s first space launch in more than 25 years, as well as the first launches for NASA from a commercial spaceport.

The expanded scope of MOU will see Phantom work with ELA to execute both a multi-launch deal for commercial equatorial orbit launches from the ASC as a “resident launcher”, as well as both parties engaging with sovereign and commercial customers to develop and design orbital missions of national importance and significance. The timing of future launches will be dependent on the conclusion of a Technology Safeguards Agreement being signed between the United States and Australia which is currently being negotiated and is expected to be in place by early 2024.

ELA’s “resident launcher concept” would see Phantom occupy a customised version of ASC’s standard 1200sqm Horizontal Integration Facility (HIF) which has all the necessary infrastructure for long term residency, such as ISO8 clean rooms, over-head cranes, storage facilities, offices and workshops. Phantom would also launch from one of two ASC standard launch pads allocated to Phantom,  customised for Phantom’s unique requirements.

ELA is currently undertaking Phase 2 expansion of the Arnhem Space Centre with an additional 2200 acres being added adjacent to the existing licenced spaceport. The ASC Phase 2 expansion includes at least 14 new orbital pads (allocated two per launch complex), up to 7 HIF facilities, a fuel and gases facility including the production of Liquid Oxygen (LOX), space weather facilities and comprehensive launch, mission and range control facilities and extensive communications and tracking equipment.

The ASC is the only commercially owned and run, multi-user equatorial launch site in the world and is located 12 degrees south of the equator on the Gulf of Carpentaria, offering unique benefits for space launches. ASC is also unique as most spaceports are federal/government owned/operated facilities.

ELA and Phantom’s announcement is the first of several agreements ELA is expecting to announce in mid-2023 as it ramps up its operations following the success of the NASA missions.

Michael Jones, Executive Chairman and Group CEO of ELA said the agreement with Phantom was the next step forward for Australia’s space industry.

“We are delighted to announce this partnership with Phantom Space Corporation which has been developing for some time. We are really keen for Phantom to become a resident launcher and access our world-leading launch site at the Arnhem Space Centre to take Australia’s space industry to the next level,” said Mr Jones.

“We liked Phantom from the outset, their technology, commercial philosophy and quite frankly they have been a launch mentor for us from our first meeting. Their experience and knowledge is a clear standout in the small launcher market.

“Last year’s successful launches with NASA allowed us to showcase the skill and capabilities of both ELA and the ASC to the world. We’re excited to embark on that journey again, this time with Phantom Space Corporation.

“This announcement not only confirms ELA’s position at the forefront of global commercial space launch, it also confirms Australia as a partner for all companies looking to launch, particularly those that want the unique benefits the ASC provides.”

Mark Lester, COO of Phantom Space said, “Launch sites are akin to gates at an airport—it’s imperative to have a robust portfolio to meet customer needs.  Arnhem Space Centre fits perfectly into Phantom’s strategy as it broadens our direct access to new orbital regimes with a proven spaceport.  In addition to ASC’s unique geography, ELA’s success with NASA’s space launches and their ability to provide a full-service spaceport at low cost were key elements in selecting ASC as our next dedicated launch site. We look forward to continuing to work with the ELA team to provide assured access to space for our customers.”

Phantom’s CEO Jim Cantrell said, “Australia has been a great friend to the United States throughout the years and we at Phantom are proud to lead the way in utilizing this unique new launch complex from Australia.  We look forward to the success of this partnership in the great tradition of the history between the two countries.”
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Offline plugger.lockett

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Re: Equatorial Launch Australia
« Reply #58 on: 05/01/2023 11:49 pm »
Any major transport hubs like airports, sea ports, rail yards and fuel installations plus major communication facilities are on the target list of hostile forces. However terrorists generally want targets that will bring them lots of media coverage, so not targets in the middle of nowhere.  Live with it.  ::)

I, uh, take it you've never been to Broome then lol

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Re: Equatorial Launch Australia
« Reply #59 on: 05/01/2023 11:51 pm »
More seriously, I'd expect the manufacturing centre would be the higher priority target when compared to the test range out in the middle of nowhere.

Offline Steven Pietrobon

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Re: Equatorial Launch Australia
« Reply #60 on: 10/11/2023 04:03 am »
Here's an excellent podcast from ELA CEO Michael Jones.

https://www.spaceconnectonline.com.au/discovery/6015-podcast-australia-s-pioneering-spaceport-with-ela

They are planning on building seven space launch complexes (SLC). Each of the SLCs will each have an horizontal integration facility that is 45 m long, 26 m wide and with a 12 m high ceiling and 20 t crane. Six of these SLCs will have two pads, one fully developed and one undeveloped, serving one client each. The seventh SLC will be for general use and will have four pads. Each pad has an hydraulic lifting plate, exhaust plume deflector and water deluge system. For each client an interface to their vehicle and launch mount will be built.

Current planning is that two of the SLC's will be built by the end of 2024 with first launch on 15 March 2025 with up to 60 launches total per year from all the pads.
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Offline Steven Pietrobon

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Re: Equatorial Launch Australia
« Reply #61 on: 10/16/2023 02:05 am »
ELA hires GM to oversee spaceport growth
Adam Thorn
12 October 2023
Equatorial Launch Australia has appointed a veteran aerospace executive to oversee the arrival of new rocket launch companies at its spaceport.

https://www.spaceconnectonline.com.au/launch/6018-ela-hires-gm-to-oversee-spaceport-growth
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Offline CameronD

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Re: Equatorial Launch Australia
« Reply #62 on: 12/19/2023 09:45 pm »
ELA unveils launch pad design for spaceport

Spaceport firm Equatorial Launch Australia has unveiled the final plans for its launch pads it believes are so versatile they can be used by multiple clients with minimal changes.

Other key features include technology to minimise damage from rocket plumes, mitigate environmental impacts and handle launch weights of up to 450,000kg.

It significantly comes after ELA announced earlier this year that a Korean launch company would become the first long-term tenant at its Arnhem Space Centre spaceport in the Northern Territory.

The company believes it can eventually accommodate up to seven rocket companies at its site, fuelled by strong demand for satellite launches combined with a lack of supply from traditional rocket companies overseas.

ELA said on Tuesday its Arnhem Space Centre Advanced Launch Pads (ASCALP) feature a “world first” and “state of the art” design.

https://www.spaceconnectonline.com.au/launch/6081-ela-unveils-launch-pad-design-for-spaceport

With sufficient thrust, pigs fly just fine - however, this is not necessarily a good idea. It is hard to be sure where they are
going to land, and it could be dangerous sitting under them as they fly overhead.

Offline Steven Pietrobon

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Re: Equatorial Launch Australia
« Reply #63 on: 12/21/2023 02:05 am »
Here's the official press release.

https://ela.space/asc-advanced-launch-pad-ascalp-design-a-game-changer-in-multi-rocket-launch-pad/

ASC Advanced Launch Pad (ASCALP) design – a game changer in multi-rocket launch pad compatibility and reusable pad design for NewSpace rockets

Equatorial Launch Australia (ELA) has today released completed designs for its state-of-the-art launch pads – a world first in launch pad design allowing any NewSpace rocket to be quickly and seamlessly mated with the pivot base of the pad – enabling all seven Space Launch Complexes (SLCs) at the Arnhem Space Centre (ASC) to launch any rocket with very little notice for configuration change. The company believes this innovative design is the most advanced NewSpace small to medium rocket launch pad in the world and will help to meet rapid-responsive launch needs in the future. The design also significantly minimises damage created by rocket plumes, substantially increasing the reusability of the launch pads.
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Offline plugger.lockett

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Re: Equatorial Launch Australia
« Reply #64 on: 01/11/2024 03:35 am »
https://www.abc.net.au/news/2024-01-10/equatorial-launch-australia-dismisses-expansion-fears/103306204

This is right up there with the stories of people leaving Broome, WA post September 11 2001 as they were convinced it was a target for bin Laden.  :o

Offline TrevorMonty

Re: Equatorial Launch Australia
« Reply #65 on: 01/11/2024 01:22 pm »
https://www.abc.net.au/news/2024-01-10/equatorial-launch-australia-dismisses-expansion-fears/103306204

This is right up there with the stories of people leaving Broome, WA post September 11 2001 as they were convinced it was a target for bin Laden.  :o
This would be way down an enemies target list. I'd be more worried about cities that have naval bases.

Offline Steven Pietrobon

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Re: Equatorial Launch Australia
« Reply #66 on: 01/25/2024 02:36 am »
https://ela.space/horizontal-integration-facility-for-asc-spaceport/

Delivering the Spaceport of the Future – HIF designs reveal full extent of ELA’s value offering to launch vehicle providers and payload customers.

23 January, 2024

* Release of the Horizontal Integration Facility designs completes the engineering design process for the Arnhem Space Centre’s Space Launch Complexes (SLC).
* The development of these designs follows extensive international research, analysis and customer input. ELA reviewed past launch successes and challenges and held discussions with other global spaceports and NASA to develop SLCs that exceed capability requirements for customers now and into the future.
* Each Resident Launcher taking up a long term, multi-launch residency at the Arnhem Space Centre will be allocated exclusive use of an SLC comprised of one standard HIF and up to two launch pads fitted with the recently announced ASCALP launch pads.
* Each of the seven SLCs are to be set up as restricted access areas providing launch companies secure sole access and commercial confidentiality during their residencies as well as compliance with ITAR (International Trade in Arms Restrictions), MTCR (Missile technology Control Regime) and TSA (Technology Safeguards Agreement) security requirements.

Equatorial Launch Australia (ELA) has today revealed completed designs for its Horizontal Integration Facility (HIF) buildings – state-of-the-art assembly, integration and testing facilities for each of up to seven rocket launch companies to be based at the Arnhem Space Centre (ASC). The purpose-built buildings offer a 40m (L) x 26m (W) x 12m (H) in standard configuration incorporating advanced space mission specific features providing launch vehicle companies and satellite payload manufacturers with cutting edge facilities to ensure their mission success.

The announcement comes on the back of the release of ELA’s ‘game changer’ ASCALP launch pad designs in December 2023. The delivery of the HIF designs completes the company’s designs for its ‘Space Launch Complex’ (SLC) – a designated area of the spaceport at which each resident launcher will locate for all preparatory work prior to and including lift off – and is comprised of up to two launch pads and one HIF building for each launch company.

“The public release of our completed HIF designs at the Arnhem Space Centre is another major milestone for ELA and we are incredibly excited to be able to share these designs with our current and future customers and with the wider space industry,” said Michael Jones, Executive Chairman and Group CEO, Equatorial Launch Australia. “We are confident that our facilities and services are, and will be, truly world leading, and we are very much looking forward to offering our customers a best-in-class experience from the moment they sign with ELA.”

“Our approach from day one was to stand in the shoes of our clients and look at everything they need to have a successful launch campaign from the ASC. The SLC concept and the HIF design is far more detailed and complex than first meets the eye and will set the standard for launch operations. The innovative designs were born from extensive and comprehensive international research on current and past spaceport service offerings and deep discussions with customers on their current and future launch needs, while also considering the needs of regulators, commercial partners and us as the spaceport operator,” said Mr Jones. “An example of this is our high clearance ISO 8 cleanroom which has 8m high ceiling and 8m high sliding doors for vertical payload integration.”

“We wanted to guarantee we were building a Spaceport of the Future for our customers and so we invested a significant amount of time and resources analysing and planning to ensure we could be as adaptable and as supportive as our customers required, while also aiming to set the bar for best practice in spaceport service and design,” he said.

Designed for modularity and flexibility, the high-specification standard HIF is designed to meet and exceed the requirements of most launch vehicle providers to give them with the extra-mile service they require.

Key features of each HIF include:

    A large 20mx 40m rocket assembly area with static discharge points, in floor pneumatic, and electrical power for assembly, integration and testing of the launch vehicles.
    A high clearance ISO 8 cleanroom with 8m high ceiling and sliding door/ceiling for vertical payload integration. The cleanroom doubles as payload workshop and is fully fitted for multiple payload preparation and integration.
    A 20,000kg full-space overhead gantry crane with a height clearance under the hook of 9m and a second 2 tonne capacity hook for payload movement.
    An indoor and enclosed workshop space to undertake minor repair/prototyping and fabrication work.
    A multi-port wall membrane for direct access to and use of launch pad equipment like container mounted power, umbilical and other support systems.
    An administrative and personnel area that offers office space, amenities and utility/storerooms.
    Large 6m (W) x 8m (H) clearance roller doors at each end of the building accommodating rockets mounted on the ASC Rocket Trolley with strongback/rail attached. The buildings also have “air lock” dust prevention entrances at each end.
    The buildings incorporate substantive insulation and HVAC climate control for the harsh NT environment. Similarly, the building is fully cyclone rated and environmentally friendly.
    Each SLC and HIF will have advanced security measures including day/night camera, movement sensors and digital access control/recording.

ELA went to extreme lengths to understand each of our clients’ individual needs and those learnings have been incorporated into this project. ELA management also visited a wide range of key spaceports globally to view and discuss facility needs. This was all aimed at ensuring ELA provides each customer with the most appropriate and capable ‘home away from home’ for their launch operations. “It’s our aim to be the spaceport partner of choice where we can work with our customers to give them the absolute best chance of repeated successful missions,” said Mr Jones.

“Whilst functionality and cost effectiveness are critical in these designs, ELA wanted to make a statement in terms of finishes, aesthetics and functionality. “We wanted more than a ‘Colorbond box’ or a just hangar, so we ensured our architects went a little ‘edgy’ and used plenty of angles and a mix of finishes and materials. Each of the seven buildings will also be a different colour and be sympathetic to the land in orientation. We are putting a lot of effort into the landscaping and vegetation to harmonise with the NT environment,“ he said.
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Offline CameronD

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Re: Equatorial Launch Australia
« Reply #67 on: 01/25/2024 03:20 am »
.........
The buildings incorporate substantive insulation and HVAC climate control for the harsh NT environment. Similarly, the building is fully cyclone rated and environmentally friendly.
.........

Purdy!! Although I do wonder:
1. How they plan to build them at a site where most everything has to come in by barge and/or unmade roads
2. How those gutters will stand up to a tropical downpour, and
3. What they'll look like after a year or three in the tropics with little or no exterior maintenance.

Time will tell  :)
With sufficient thrust, pigs fly just fine - however, this is not necessarily a good idea. It is hard to be sure where they are
going to land, and it could be dangerous sitting under them as they fly overhead.

Offline plugger.lockett

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Re: Equatorial Launch Australia
« Reply #68 on: 02/02/2024 01:37 am »

Purdy!! Although I do wonder:
1. How they plan to build them at a site where most everything has to come in by barge and/or unmade roads
Considering they already have significant infrastructure on site this hardly seems to be an issue.
Quote
2. How those gutters will stand up to a tropical downpour, and
They're concept images, not 'as built' documentation.
Quote
3. What they'll look like after a year or three in the tropics with little or no exterior maintenance.
Where exactly did it state they'd not do exterior maintenance?
Also, it's not like building launch facilities in the tropics is an unknown/unknown, Guiana Space Centre immediately comes to mind.

Offline CameronD

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Re: Equatorial Launch Australia
« Reply #69 on: 02/02/2024 02:33 am »
Purdy!! Although I do wonder:
1. How they plan to build them at a site where most everything has to come in by barge and/or unmade roads
Considering they already have significant infrastructure on site this hardly seems to be an issue.

Really?!?  I must have missed it in the tall grass.
With sufficient thrust, pigs fly just fine - however, this is not necessarily a good idea. It is hard to be sure where they are
going to land, and it could be dangerous sitting under them as they fly overhead.

Offline plugger.lockett

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Re: Equatorial Launch Australia
« Reply #70 on: 02/09/2024 01:17 am »
Considering they already have significant infrastructure on site this hardly seems to be an issue.

Really?!?  I must have missed it in the tall grass.

Look harder lol. Below is a picture of the most significant commercial launch site in Australia to date, both in terms of infrastructure and actually launching rockets into space.

It seems you might be confused with another domestic launch company, which appears to have next to no launch infra at their "Orbital Launch Complex".

Offline Steven Pietrobon

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Re: Equatorial Launch Australia
« Reply #71 on: 02/19/2024 03:45 am »
"Equatorial Space Systems to launch from Arnhem Space Centre

Equatorial Launch Australia (ELA) has announced the signing of a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) with Singaporean rocket company Equatorial Space Systems (ESS) for a series of launches of the Dorado family of suborbital rockets at the Arnhem Space Centre, planned for late 2024."

https://spaceanddefense.io/equatorial-launch-australia-to-launch-from-arnhem-space-centre/
« Last Edit: 02/19/2024 03:46 am by Steven Pietrobon »
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Offline CameronD

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Re: Equatorial Launch Australia
« Reply #72 on: 02/19/2024 04:54 am »
FWIW, that pic was taken at Avalon Airshow in March last year.  Here's one of my own from the same location.
With sufficient thrust, pigs fly just fine - however, this is not necessarily a good idea. It is hard to be sure where they are
going to land, and it could be dangerous sitting under them as they fly overhead.

Offline Metalskin

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Re: Equatorial Launch Australia
« Reply #73 on: 02/19/2024 05:47 am »
FWIW, that pic was taken at Avalon Airshow in March last year.  Here's one of my own from the same location.

Wow, it's been many a decade since I went to the Avalon Airshow!

Thank you for sharing :-)
How inappropriate to call this planet Earth when it is quite clearly Ocean. - Arthur C. Clarke

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