Author Topic: Gilmour Space Technologies  (Read 120027 times)

Offline Steven Pietrobon

  • Member
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 38603
  • Adelaide, Australia
    • Steven Pietrobon's Space Archive
  • Liked: 31813
  • Likes Given: 7747
Re: Gilmour Space Technologies
« Reply #40 on: 08/17/2018 07:09 am »
Some closeups of Glimour's engine in this video at 4 minutes. Shows a composite nozzle is being used.

Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Offline Steven Pietrobon

  • Member
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 38603
  • Adelaide, Australia
    • Steven Pietrobon's Space Archive
  • Liked: 31813
  • Likes Given: 7747
Re: Gilmour Space Technologies
« Reply #41 on: 08/17/2018 08:18 am »
Gilmour Space Technologies are hiring. They are looking for extraordinary people, with a minimum of 5-10 years of direct & relevant experience, to be a part of their team on the Gold Coast.

* Fabricator
* Rocket Propulsion manager
* Guidance & Navigation manager
* Vector Control manager
* Finance manager
* HR manager

Details here: https://www.gspacetech.com/join-us

(More jobs to be posted in the coming months.)
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Offline Steven Pietrobon

  • Member
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 38603
  • Adelaide, Australia
    • Steven Pietrobon's Space Archive
  • Liked: 31813
  • Likes Given: 7747
Re: Gilmour Space Technologies
« Reply #42 on: 08/17/2018 08:19 am »
Latest engine test:

Large hybrid rocket engine:
- Duration: 17 seconds
- Thrust: 80 kN

Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Offline CameronD

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2368
  • Melbourne, Australia
    • Norton Consultants
  • Liked: 864
  • Likes Given: 548
Re: Gilmour Space Technologies
« Reply #43 on: 08/19/2018 11:16 pm »
Gilmour Space Technologies are hiring. They are looking for extraordinary people, with a minimum of 5-10 years of direct & relevant experience, to be a part of their team on the Gold Coast.

* Fabricator
* Rocket Propulsion manager
* Guidance & Navigation manager
* Vector Control manager
* Finance manager
* HR manager

Details here: https://www.gspacetech.com/join-us

(More jobs to be posted in the coming months.)

So.. they have an idea, an engine, lots of $$$ (that's +$1M/yr in that list right there), but no rocket and nowhere to launch from??

Maybe watch this space.
« Last Edit: 08/19/2018 11:19 pm by CameronD »
With sufficient thrust, pigs fly just fine - however, this is not necessarily a good idea. It is hard to be sure where they are
going to land, and it could be dangerous sitting under them as they fly overhead.

Offline Steven Pietrobon

  • Member
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 38603
  • Adelaide, Australia
    • Steven Pietrobon's Space Archive
  • Liked: 31813
  • Likes Given: 7747
Re: Gilmour Space Technologies
« Reply #44 on: 08/20/2018 05:04 am »
Latest press release. This is the last ground test before suborbital launch in fourth quarter this year. Plan for orbital Eris-100 in 2020 (100 kg payload) and Eris-400 in 2021 (400 kg payload).

https://shoutout.wix.com/so/eMElnpYo#/main
« Last Edit: 08/20/2018 05:04 am by Steven Pietrobon »
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Offline Steven Pietrobon

  • Member
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 38603
  • Adelaide, Australia
    • Steven Pietrobon's Space Archive
  • Liked: 31813
  • Likes Given: 7747
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Offline CameronD

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2368
  • Melbourne, Australia
    • Norton Consultants
  • Liked: 864
  • Likes Given: 548
With sufficient thrust, pigs fly just fine - however, this is not necessarily a good idea. It is hard to be sure where they are
going to land, and it could be dangerous sitting under them as they fly overhead.

Offline Steven Pietrobon

  • Member
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 38603
  • Adelaide, Australia
    • Steven Pietrobon's Space Archive
  • Liked: 31813
  • Likes Given: 7747
Re: Gilmour Space Technologies
« Reply #47 on: 08/30/2018 08:13 am »
Where from?  The article doesn't really say..

I don't know, but I expect it to be somewhere from Queensland.
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Offline QuantumG

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 9238
  • Australia
  • Liked: 4476
  • Likes Given: 1108
Re: Gilmour Space Technologies
« Reply #48 on: 08/30/2018 11:03 pm »
Where from?  The article doesn't really say..

I don't know, but I expect it to be somewhere from Queensland.

I thought they were launching from Singapore... if not Adelaide. If we're talking low altitude flights there's a few amateur ranges in SE QLD, but that's about it.
Human spaceflight is basically just LARPing now.

Offline CameronD

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2368
  • Melbourne, Australia
    • Norton Consultants
  • Liked: 864
  • Likes Given: 548
Re: Gilmour Space Technologies
« Reply #49 on: 08/31/2018 01:27 am »
Where from?  The article doesn't really say..

I don't know, but I expect it to be somewhere from Queensland.

I thought they were launching from Singapore... if not Adelaide. If we're talking low altitude flights there's a few amateur ranges in SE QLD, but that's about it.

Not Adelaide (yet). And I would not have thought you could get approval for a "suborbital launch" from anywhere in SEQ?

Mostly likely Singapore then.  :'(
« Last Edit: 08/31/2018 07:27 am by CameronD »
With sufficient thrust, pigs fly just fine - however, this is not necessarily a good idea. It is hard to be sure where they are
going to land, and it could be dangerous sitting under them as they fly overhead.

Offline Steven Pietrobon

  • Member
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 38603
  • Adelaide, Australia
    • Steven Pietrobon's Space Archive
  • Liked: 31813
  • Likes Given: 7747
Re: Gilmour Space Technologies
« Reply #50 on: 09/04/2018 04:02 am »
I've been in contact with Gilmour. They said they are launching from a remote Queensland location, subject to government approvals by the end of the year.
« Last Edit: 09/04/2018 04:04 am by Steven Pietrobon »
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Offline plugger.lockett

  • Full Member
  • *
  • Posts: 119
  • Perth, WA
  • Liked: 46
  • Likes Given: 8
Re: Gilmour Space Technologies
« Reply #51 on: 09/20/2018 08:05 am »
Gilmour's only flown a rocket once to my knowledge. This flight.



That took place at the QRS launch site in Westmar, QLD. The site has a a waiver which covers flights up to 120k' AMSL. If Gilmour is going to launch later in the year/early next year I suspect Westmar will be the site if they can get permission.

Offline QuantumG

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 9238
  • Australia
  • Liked: 4476
  • Likes Given: 1108
Re: Gilmour Space Technologies
« Reply #52 on: 09/20/2018 10:25 pm »
Gilmour's only flown a rocket once to my knowledge. This flight.

Was that a hybrid? I'm kinda wondering if there's any relationship here to the hybrid guy I knew years ago in QRS. He was not very popular... was seen as doing some risky stuff with nitrous.
Human spaceflight is basically just LARPing now.

Offline plugger.lockett

  • Full Member
  • *
  • Posts: 119
  • Perth, WA
  • Liked: 46
  • Likes Given: 8
Re: Gilmour Space Technologies
« Reply #53 on: 09/21/2018 12:39 am »
Was that a hybrid? I'm kinda wondering if there's any relationship here to the hybrid guy I knew years ago in QRS. He was not very popular... was seen as doing some risky stuff with nitrous.

Looking at the exhaust it does appear to be a hybrid. I doubt it was HTP though, most likely nitrous?

I don't think the hybrid guy you're referring to has much of a relationship with Gilmour. We could be thinking of two different people but there haven't been too many guys in QRS historically that were into hybrids and not very popular.

Offline QuantumG

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 9238
  • Australia
  • Liked: 4476
  • Likes Given: 1108
Re: Gilmour Space Technologies
« Reply #54 on: 09/21/2018 02:56 am »
I don't think the hybrid guy you're referring to has much of a relationship with Gilmour. We could be thinking of two different people but there haven't been too many guys in QRS historically that were into hybrids and not very popular.

That's good news :)
Human spaceflight is basically just LARPing now.

Offline CameronD

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2368
  • Melbourne, Australia
    • Norton Consultants
  • Liked: 864
  • Likes Given: 548
Re: Gilmour Space Technologies
« Reply #55 on: 09/21/2018 02:56 am »
That took place at the QRS launch site in Westmar, QLD. The site has a a waiver which covers flights up to 120k' AMSL. If Gilmour is going to launch later in the year/early next year I suspect Westmar will be the site if they can get permission.

Well... the current ERC for that area, valid until 08 November, makes no mention of any Restricted or Danger areas in the vicinity of the "Model Rocketry" ( ;D) site at Westmar, which is what I'd expect they'd need to stop planes flying right over the top at 2,700' and above.  It seems to be kinda close to W279 too.

Maybe watch this space. 
« Last Edit: 09/21/2018 03:01 am by CameronD »
With sufficient thrust, pigs fly just fine - however, this is not necessarily a good idea. It is hard to be sure where they are
going to land, and it could be dangerous sitting under them as they fly overhead.

Offline plugger.lockett

  • Full Member
  • *
  • Posts: 119
  • Perth, WA
  • Liked: 46
  • Likes Given: 8
Re: Gilmour Space Technologies
« Reply #56 on: 09/21/2018 03:14 am »
Given NOTAMs are only put in place for launch days and there are no scheduled launch days near Westmar for the rest of the year that makes sense to me.

Offline Steven Pietrobon

  • Member
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 38603
  • Adelaide, Australia
    • Steven Pietrobon's Space Archive
  • Liked: 31813
  • Likes Given: 7747
Re: Gilmour Space Technologies
« Reply #57 on: 09/21/2018 08:55 am »
Was that a hybrid?

Yes. It used nitrous oxide and solid ABS fuel.
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Offline Steven Pietrobon

  • Member
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 38603
  • Adelaide, Australia
    • Steven Pietrobon's Space Archive
  • Liked: 31813
  • Likes Given: 7747
Re: Gilmour Space Technologies
« Reply #58 on: 10/01/2018 04:40 am »
https://shoutout.wix.com/so/aMHKUWob#/main

Australia & Singapore, Sept 28 — Gilmour Space Technologies, a leading hybrid propulsion company in Queensland and Singapore, has raised AUD 19 million (SGD 19 million) to scale-up and launch its first commercial hybrid rocket to space in 2020.

The Series B investment round was led by top-tier venture capital firms in Australia: Main Sequence Ventures, which manages Australia’s Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization (CSIRO) innovation fund; and Blackbird Ventures, which led Gilmour Space’s AUD 5 million Series A round in May last year.

Other investors include US-based 500 Startups, who increased their stake from the Series A round; as well as new venture capital, family-office and private investors.
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Offline Steven Pietrobon

  • Member
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 38603
  • Adelaide, Australia
    • Steven Pietrobon's Space Archive
  • Liked: 31813
  • Likes Given: 7747
Re: Gilmour Space Technologies
« Reply #59 on: 12/05/2018 10:22 am »
Spoke with the Gilmour brothers today at the South Australian Space Forum. Launch of their Ariel sounding rocket is currently scheduled for January next year. To avoid going over 100 km, the vehicle will not be using a full propellant load and will be using an aluminium case instead of carbon fibre. Going over 100 km requires obtaining $750M of insurance due to current Australian space legislation (which should be changing next year to be more favourable to the launch industry). Unfortunately, there will be no live webcast due to the very high cost of satellite access from the Queensland outback, where they are launching from. They have promised to send tweets though and will try to upload a video of the launch as soon as they get back to the local town.
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Tags:
 

Advertisement NovaTech
Advertisement Northrop Grumman
Advertisement
Advertisement Margaritaville Beach Resort South Padre Island
Advertisement Brady Kenniston
Advertisement NextSpaceflight
Advertisement Nathan Barker Photography
0