Author Topic: DPRK Solid Rocket Fuel  (Read 5041 times)

Offline Fzapper

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DPRK Solid Rocket Fuel
« on: 04/20/2017 02:18 am »
It has been reported that N Korea has been testing new missiles with a different color plume (translucent pink-purple flame ). Any thoughts on what this could be and how specific impulse compares to less energetic fuels?

 See http://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-39628223

Offline Fzapper

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Re: DPRK Solid Rocket Fuel
« Reply #1 on: 04/20/2017 02:51 am »
Maybe relevant: http://38north.org/2016/04/schilling041116/

Refers to the April test but  here the plume is orange unlike BBC report and also refers to liquid fuel . Discussion I thought very interesting.

Offline RDoc

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Re: DPRK Solid Rocket Fuel
« Reply #2 on: 07/08/2017 04:05 am »
The video of the ICBM they recently launched showed no smoke trail at all. That seems pretty unusual to me, although I'm certainly no expert.

Any thoughts from experts?

Offline Stan-1967

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Re: DPRK Solid Rocket Fuel
« Reply #3 on: 07/08/2017 05:00 am »
Per the www.38north.org link above thread, the new NK fuel choice would be UDMH & N204.  This offers about a 15% better ISP than prior NK boost stage engines, and looks to be based ( copied really) on Russian SLBM technology.

Offline Kryten

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Re: DPRK Solid Rocket Fuel
« Reply #4 on: 07/08/2017 09:20 am »
Pukguksong-2 is the largest solid missile they've tested so far, it's roughly in the 2,000km range class (MRBM).

Offline Vahe231991

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Re: DPRK Solid Rocket Fuel
« Reply #5 on: 06/05/2023 03:38 pm »
Per the www.38north.org link above thread, the new NK fuel choice would be UDMH & N204.  This offers about a 15% better ISP than prior NK boost stage engines, and looks to be based ( copied really) on Russian SLBM technology.
The Pukkuksong-1 and Pukguksong-2 designs aren't based on Soviet/Russian SLBM technology. Although a number of analysts suggested that development of the Pukkuksong-1 and Pukguksong-2 was made possible by SLBM technologies given by China, Dave Schmerler of the James Martin Center of Non Proliferation Studies disputed this argument by noting that the Pukkuksong-1 has grid fins for flight stability and a single engine unlike the JL-1 (which used 4 engines), and that single-engine design of this missile is reminiscent of that of the Iranian Sejjil medium-range ballistic missile.

Links:
http://world.kbs.co.kr/service/news_view.htm?lang=e&Seq_Code=121571
https://www.nknews.org/pro/what-did-we-learn-from-north-koreas-latest-kn-11-test/

 

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