Author Topic: South Korean space developments  (Read 67380 times)

Offline Kryten

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Re: South Korean space developments
« Reply #40 on: 06/08/2018 06:30 am »

KSLV-2 pilot vehicle static test.

Offline Tywin

Re: South Korean space developments
« Reply #41 on: 01/25/2019 06:56 pm »
Interesting PDF, about the future of the South Korea space program, with mission to Mars for the next decade too...




https://www.stepi.re.kr/module/seminaDownFile.jsp?cmsCd=CM0038&ntNo=27174&sbNo=5&fileFlag=spk
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Offline Closer to Space

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Re: South Korean space developments
« Reply #42 on: 01/19/2020 10:24 pm »
The test model of the KSLV-2 is being manufactured.

https://twitter.com/kari2030/status/1218740115540860928

Offline zubenelgenubi

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Re: South Korean space developments
« Reply #43 on: 01/20/2020 07:07 am »
The test model of the KSLV-2 is being manufactured.
Google translate, without the #s:
Quote
Korean launch vehicle Nuri 1st stage system development model (EM) assembly site disclosure🚀

Nuri 1st stage diameter is 3.6m, larger than Naro 1st stage (diameter 2.9m), Naro 1st stage has one engine The Nuri 1st Stage contains four 75t engines.
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Offline Lucid Nonsense

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Re: South Korean space developments
« Reply #44 on: 04/06/2020 08:47 am »
Just an update.

Testing of the QM (Qualification Model) of the 3rd stage of KSLV-2 has been completed.
https://twitter.com/kari2030/status/1224849745719357440

The QM of the full launcher is being prepared and will be tested (on the ground) in tandem with the new launch pad when its construction is also finished. The manufacturing of the FM (Flight Model) is also progressing.

Further news is that preliminary research is starting for a smallsat launcher. It will have 2 stages. The first stage will use the already developed Kerolox engine from the KSLV-2. The second stage engine is interestingly planned to be of a new design. Instead of using the 3rd stage engine from KSLV-2, it will be a restartable Methalox engine with roughly half the thrust.

https://www.etnews.com/20200406000129

Offline jpo234

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You want to be inspired by things. You want to wake up in the morning and think the future is going to be great. That's what being a spacefaring civilization is all about. It's about believing in the future and believing the future will be better than the past. And I can't think of anything more exciting than being out there among the stars.

Offline Zed_Noir

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Re: South Korean space developments
« Reply #46 on: 08/08/2020 10:54 am »
http://m.koreatimes.co.kr/pages/article.asp?newsIdx=293970

Eric Berger have a mention of the Korean Times article in this weeks Rocket Report.

Quote from: Arstechnica Rocket Report for 08/07/2020
South Korea mulls exiting its own launch program. South Korean defense industry analysts say the nation would have difficulty competing with other countries in the launch industry, which can provide more advanced technologies and services at lower prices with their already established space-industry infrastructure. "Even if South Korea develops its own rockets, they would not be able to excel more than aerospace giants like SpaceX in terms of technology," said Shin Jong-woo, a senior researcher at the Korea Defense and Security Forum, in The Korea Times.

Ten times the cost ... The country's space institute, KARI, has developed several small-satellite rockets, but these are not competitive with SpaceX's Falcon 9, which recently launched South Korea's first military communications satellite, ANASIS-II. "The costs spent by the South Korean government to develop the two rockets were 10 times higher than those spent by SpaceX," Kim Seung-jo, former president of KARI, said. "But the South Korean government's outcomes in its rocket projects were far behind the Falcon 9 rocket produced by SpaceX."
Ars Technica Rocket Report

Offline eeergo

Re: South Korean space developments
« Reply #47 on: 12/02/2020 09:21 am »
Flight model has been completed, and static firing is next.

https://twitter.com/Kor_Spaceflight/status/1333924451201605632
-DaviD-

Offline Lucid Nonsense

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Re: South Korean space developments
« Reply #48 on: 01/17/2021 08:06 am »


An interesting video outlining some of the efforts to Merlin 1D-ify the current KRE-75 engine.

Their plan is to increase combustion pressures from 60 bar to 100 bar.

There has also been the adoption of 3d printing technologies to create complex structures within the baffle injectors that cannot be manufactured with traditional techniques. This is to combat combustion instability that will arise due to greater performance. This is accompanied by interesting imagines of an injector face with 3 radial baffle injectors. I bet this is just for the scaled-down model that is currently being tested and not the actual design of the actual KRE-75+.

And the last performance figure is that while the Vac. ISP of the current (first-stage) KRE-75 is 299s, the improved version will hopefully increase that to 312s.

All in all, it sounds promising. Previously KARI struggled with combustion instability to get the KRE-75 where it is currently and hopefully they can overcome it for this increased thrust variant. Would be nice to see somewhat Merlin 1D like performance possible with a more typical face injector instead of the pintle injector of the Merlins.

Albeit I doubt this engine will ever be as lightweight and thus have the amazing T/W ratio the Merlin 1D does, even though mass improvements are another goal that KARI professes to have in improving the KRE-75.

Offline Vahe231991

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Offline starbase

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Re: South Korean space developments
« Reply #50 on: 07/25/2021 09:03 am »
Quote
South Korea's top flag carrier Korean Air will follow the footsteps of Virgin Orbit, a California-based company that provides launch services for small satellites, to analyze the possibility of launching space rockets using civilian aircraft. The development of a projectile launched in the air is possible after Washington lifted restrictions on South Korea's missile development in May.

LauncherOne is a two-stage orbital launch vehicle developed by Virgin Orbit that began operational flights in 2021. It is an air-launched rocket, designed to carry smallsat payloads of up to 300 kilograms following air launch from a carrier aircraft at high altitude. The rocket is carried to the upper atmosphere on a modified Boeing 747-400 and released over the Pacific Ocean.

In a military project ordered by the airforce space agency, Korean Air (KAL) and a research team from Seoul National University will analyze technical levels, major application technologies, operating costs, remodeling measures for the development of an orbital launch vehicle using a Boeing 747-400 civilian plane.

Korean Air said South Korea can overcome geographical limitations in launching space rockets. The air launch of projectiles can reduce the cost of building and maintaining a separate launch site. "The development of aerial launch unaffected by weather and geographical requirements is essential to attract the rapidly increasing demand for small satellite launches worldwide," an unnamed KAL official said in a statement on July 20.

South Korea's airforce has launched the "Space Odyssey" project to have a space monitoring system by 2030, launch satellites from the air using transport planes by 2040, and have deterrence capabilities against the threat of space weapons by 2050. South Korea hopes to develop technologies to track and identify space objects and satellites with lasers. The role of anti-satellite weapons includes defensive measures against space-based, nuclear or intercontinental ballistic missiles and nuclear weapons.

In May, the defense ministry unveiled a long-term goal to develop platforms for the launch of space rockets using aircraft or at sea. Most launch vehicles take off from sites on land. The advantages of an air-based launch are flexibility in the launch location and the use of a carrier aircraft that could reduce propulsion requirements needed to reach orbit.

South Korea has disclosed the goal of producing small low-orbit satellites weighing under 100 kilograms in a space program led by the state-run Korea Aerospace Research Institute (KARI). South Korea's space program has seen slow progress as other countries are reluctant to transfer core technologies. Three space rockets have been launched but two fired in 2009 and 2010 failed to reach orbit.

Source: https://www.ajudaily.com/view/20210720113859582
bit.ly/SpaceLaunchCalendar ☆ bit.ly/SpaceEventCalendar

Offline Vahe231991

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Re: South Korean space developments
« Reply #51 on: 07/28/2021 01:27 am »
Quote
South Korea's top flag carrier Korean Air will follow the footsteps of Virgin Orbit, a California-based company that provides launch services for small satellites, to analyze the possibility of launching space rockets using civilian aircraft. The development of a projectile launched in the air is possible after Washington lifted restrictions on South Korea's missile development in May.

LauncherOne is a two-stage orbital launch vehicle developed by Virgin Orbit that began operational flights in 2021. It is an air-launched rocket, designed to carry smallsat payloads of up to 300 kilograms following air launch from a carrier aircraft at high altitude. The rocket is carried to the upper atmosphere on a modified Boeing 747-400 and released over the Pacific Ocean.

In a military project ordered by the airforce space agency, Korean Air (KAL) and a research team from Seoul National University will analyze technical levels, major application technologies, operating costs, remodeling measures for the development of an orbital launch vehicle using a Boeing 747-400 civilian plane.

Korean Air said South Korea can overcome geographical limitations in launching space rockets. The air launch of projectiles can reduce the cost of building and maintaining a separate launch site. "The development of aerial launch unaffected by weather and geographical requirements is essential to attract the rapidly increasing demand for small satellite launches worldwide," an unnamed KAL official said in a statement on July 20.

South Korea's airforce has launched the "Space Odyssey" project to have a space monitoring system by 2030, launch satellites from the air using transport planes by 2040, and have deterrence capabilities against the threat of space weapons by 2050. South Korea hopes to develop technologies to track and identify space objects and satellites with lasers. The role of anti-satellite weapons includes defensive measures against space-based, nuclear or intercontinental ballistic missiles and nuclear weapons.

In May, the defense ministry unveiled a long-term goal to develop platforms for the launch of space rockets using aircraft or at sea. Most launch vehicles take off from sites on land. The advantages of an air-based launch are flexibility in the launch location and the use of a carrier aircraft that could reduce propulsion requirements needed to reach orbit.

South Korea has disclosed the goal of producing small low-orbit satellites weighing under 100 kilograms in a space program led by the state-run Korea Aerospace Research Institute (KARI). South Korea's space program has seen slow progress as other countries are reluctant to transfer core technologies. Three space rockets have been launched but two fired in 2009 and 2010 failed to reach orbit.

Source: https://www.ajudaily.com/view/20210720113859582
It's possible that KARI could finance development of an air-launched version of the Hyunmoo-3 cruise missile?
« Last Edit: 06/22/2022 01:11 am by Vahe231991 »

Offline Yiosie

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Re: South Korean space developments
« Reply #52 on: 09/08/2021 10:35 pm »
South Korea to spend $593 million on public-to-private transfer of rocket technologies

Quote from: SpaceNews
SEOUL, South Korea – Starting next year, South Korea’s government will transfer state-owned space launch vehicle technologies to domestic aerospace companies in a move to help them penetrate an expanding global space launch market. To that end, the government will spend 687 billion won ($593 million) from 2022 through 2027, said the Ministry of Science and ICT, Sept. 7.

Korea Aerospace Research Institute (KARI) — a state-run space technology developer that has played a central role in developing the nation’s first domestic space launch vehicle, KSLV-2 — will be responsible for the public-to-private transfer, according to the ministry. KSLV-2, nicknamed Nuri, is a three-stage liquid-propellant rocket capable of sending a 1.5-ton satellite into low Earth orbit. The rocket is set to make its first demonstration flight in October from Naro Space Center in Goheung, the only launch site in South Korea.

<snip>

While the science ministry didn’t  identify the companies that would benefit from the latest tech transfer, the most likely beneficiaries include Hanwha Aerospace, Innospace, Perigee Aerospace and Korean Air.

Hanwha is a major rocket engine developer here, which contributed to KSLV-2’s development with engine assembly and supply of key components. Innospace is a hybrid rocket startup, and Perigee is developing a methane-fueled smallsat launcher. Korea Air, South Korea’s biggest airline, is developing technologies to launch small satellites from its Boeing 747-400 cargo planes — the same way Virgin Orbit launches customers’ satellites into orbit.

Offline Yiosie

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Re: South Korean space developments
« Reply #53 on: 09/14/2021 10:23 pm »
Lots of South Korean space news in the last few months!

South Korea’s GNSS project to take off with $3.3 billion budget

Quote
South Korea has set off on a journey to build its own satellite navigation system, in cooperation with the United States, by 2035 to provide more accurate and reliable position, navigation and timing information across the country.

Named “ Korea Positioning System” (KPS), the project cleared the government’s budget feasibility study June 25, taking one step closer to winning the proposed budget of 3.72 trillion won ($3.3 billion) by the Ministry of Science and ICT, which has pushed forward with the project since 2018. If the budget is approved by the National Assembly, the ministry will begin initial work next year to establish KPS by 2035 by launching eight new satellites — three satellites into geosynchronous orbit and five into inclined geosynchronous orbit. The first satellite for KPS will be launched in 2027, with a trial service scheduled for 2034 and a full-fledged one the following year, according to the ministry.

South Korea seeks $553 million space budget for 2022

Quote
While the country is set to launch its first domestically developed space launch vehicle KSLV-2 — a three-stage liquid-propellant rocket capable of hauling up to 1,500 kilograms of payload to low Earth orbit — in October, it has already set off on a journey to develop bigger and more powerful rocket. The 172.8 billion won is a fraction of the 700 billion won South Korea is planning to invest for the rollout of a next-generation space launch vehicle by 2026, according to the document.

“We are planning to develop a next-generation launch vehicle based upon KSLV-2, capable of launching our [robotic] lunar orbiter on our own,”
said Kwon Hyun-joon, a senior official of the Space, Nuclear and Big Science Policy Bureau at the Ministry of Science and ICT, in June. “There is another idea under consideration: making a more innovative model, for which we need to do everything from scratch.” 

Another major space project, for which the government set aside 84.5 billion won next year, is establishing South Korea’s own satellite navigation system, called Korea Positioning System (KPS). The project will begin next year and take 13 years to complete, during which the government will spend a total of 3.7 trillion won launching eight satellites — three satellites into geosynchronous orbit and five into inclined geosynchronous orbit.

Launching the nation’s first robotic lunar orbiter, called Korea Pathfinder Lunar Orbiter (KPLO), is another main project, for which the government is planning to invest 19.8 billion won. The spacecraft is set to launch in August 2022 aboard a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket to image the moon for one year. NASA provided an advanced lunar reconnaissance orbiter camera, nicknamed ShadowCam, to the orbiter in a show of support. In return, the KPLO will be assigned work for NASA’s moon mission identifying areas with water.

The government said KPLO’s launch will “fulfill South Korea’s role as a major partner of the Artemis Program and enhance the bilateral cooperation in space.”

Korea Positioning System (KPS) news in red, next-generation launch vehicle news in blue, and KPLO news in green.

Offline Yiosie

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Re: South Korean space developments
« Reply #54 on: 11/12/2021 10:32 pm »
South Korea to develop reusable rocket with 100-ton thrust engines [dated Nov. 11]

Quote
Starting next year, South Korea will develop a reusable rocket with a cluster of liquid-fueled 100-ton thrust engines. The Korea Aerospace Research Institute (KARI) will be responsible for its development, though a concrete timetable and other details of the mission are up in the air.

A ruling party lawmaker announced the plan Nov. 10 after a meeting attended by Minister of Science and ICT Lim Hye-sook and members of the National Assembly’s Science, ICT, Future Planning, Broadcasting and Communications Committee.

“Starting next year, the development of a high-performance reusable rocket with liquid-fueled 100-ton thrust engines will begin,” said Rep. Cho Seung-rae of the ruling Democratic Party of Korea, who represents the committee. “Having such a liquid-fueled high-performance rocket engine is necessary [for South Korea] to successfully fulfill the missions of launching a [robotic] lunar lander by 2030 and building the Korea Positioning System by 2035 on its own.”

<snip>

The plan to develop a reusable rocket came as a surprise because “reusability” was nowhere to be seen in the government’s budget request for 2022 — in which South Korea’s next-generation rocket was supposed to be a single-use model that is “bigger and more powerful” than KSLV-2, a three-stage rocket launched Oct. 21 with four KRE-075 engines in its first-stage booster.

Cho didn’t explain what caused the change. He also didn’t clarify if the planned reusable rocket will be designated as the nation’s next-generation launch vehicle, or if it will be developed along with an advanced expendable rocket. The lawmaker said this issue, along with others meant to promote the domestic space industry, will be discussed during a Nov. 15 meeting at the National Space Council, the top decision-making government body on space issues under the Prime Minister.

Online Asteroza

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Re: South Korean space developments
« Reply #55 on: 12/02/2021 11:08 pm »
Some sort of VLEO EO sat in development, via SatRec Initiative? Sorta similar to SLATS and GOCE.

https://www.sedaily.com/NewsVIew/22TYOXE1GY

https://twitter.com/arrow_cf/status/1461340357992402950

https://www.satreci.com/korean/sub0401


There was a US military AFWERX contract in 2020 for a similar winged shuttlecock style EO sat from

https://www.earthobservant.com/

Offline PM3

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Re: South Korean space developments
« Reply #56 on: 12/26/2021 05:25 pm »
And another new Korean rocket, announced on December 6:

Quote from: Babelfish
Hanwha Aerospace, an affiliate of Hanwha Group's defense industry, announced on the 6th that it would promote the project of 'concept design and development of a small launch vehicle system' together with the Korea Aerospace Research Institute (Aerospace Research Institute). On the 2nd, the company also reviewed the design of the small launch vehicle (pictured) with the anti-accident.

A small launch vehicle refers to a launch vehicle capable of launching a small satellite with a size of 500 kg into space. Hanwha Aerospace signed a main business contract with Hangwoon in May, and plans to complete the projectile concept design by March next year.

Hanwha Aerospace explained that it was able to continue this small launch vehicle project by being recognized for the technology verified in the previous Nuri project. The company has previously produced a 75-ton liquid rocket that can be called the “heart of the Nuri.”

https://www.seoul.co.kr/news/newsView.php?id=20211207022011
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Offline Yiosie

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Re: South Korean space developments
« Reply #57 on: 08/30/2022 07:06 pm »
South Korea seeks $459 million for lunar lander project [dated Aug. 30]

Quote from: SpaceNews
South Korea seeks a $459 million budget to build a 1.8-ton robotic lunar lander, which it wants to send to the moon in 2031 for a one-year mission on the nation’s next-generation carrier rocket under development.

<snip>

According to the presentation, KARI seeks 618.4 billion won ($459 million) to build the lander and payload in collaboration with domestic institutes, universities and companies as part of an effort to nurture the nascent domestic space industry. Aboard the lander would be a 13-kilogram detector of volatile substances in the regolith, a 27-kilogram autonomous navigation system for the lander’s soft-landing on the moon, a 0.75-kilogram nuclear power generator, and a 15-kilogram rover. The rover could carry a 5-kilogram payload: an electron gun designed to image and analyze lunar dust, and a high-resolution camera.

The octangle lander with four fixed landing gears would carry 1,210 kilograms of fuel and maneuver with three 420-newton thrusters, six 220-newton thrusters, and sixteen 20-newton engines for attitude control. While solar panels will be installed on the lander’s top and side, the rover’s deployment platform will be installed on one side of the lander. The presentation didn’t identify organizations that would participate in the project.

“If everything goes as planned, the development will begin in 2024 and continue through 2031,” said Cheon Yee-jin, a principal researcher at KARI, in the presentation live streamed online. “It will launch in 2031 and operate on the lunar surface for one year.”

Offline Mahurora

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Re: South Korean space developments
« Reply #58 on: 12/12/2022 01:02 am »
https://www.khan.co.kr/science/aerospace/article/202211291730001

Development program of the next generation rocket, dubbed the KSLV-3 has passed the preliminary feasibility review. This signals a go sign for the development program that will span a decade. Under current plan, first flight model will be manufactured starting 2028 until 2030 and launched in December 2030. This will be followed by a second launcher in 2031 and third in 2032. The payload for each launchers are as follows: First launcher will be launched with a lunar orbit satellite for performance verification. Second launcher will be launched to the moon with a lunar landing verification vehicle called the PFM (Proto-Flight Model) and the third with actual Korea Lunar Lander and Rover.

KSLV-3 consists of 2 stages. The first stage will be powered by five 100t metalox SCC engines whereas the second stage will be powered by two 10t metalox SCC engines. Both the first and second stage will be able to throttle from 100% all the way down to 40% maximum thrust and will be able to reignite multiple times. Reignition capabilities of the first stage is going to be developed with future reusable SLV in mind.

« Last Edit: 12/12/2022 01:03 am by Mahurora »

Offline Tywin

The knowledge is power...Everything is connected...
The Turtle continues at a steady pace ...

 

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