Author Topic: NASA - Juno - Updates  (Read 312474 times)

Offline Artyom.

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Re: NASA - Juno - Updates
« Reply #80 on: 12/12/2013 01:41 pm »
Earth and Moon Seen by Passing Juno Spacecraft with Music by Vangelis

When NASA's Juno spacecraft flew past Earth on Oct. 9, 2013, it received a boost in speed of more than 8,800 mph (about 7.3 kilometer per second), which set it on course for a July 4, 2016, rendezvous with Jupiter.

One of Juno's sensors, a special kind of camera optimized to track faint stars, also had a unique view of the Earth-moon system. The result was an intriguing, low-resolution glimpse of what our world would look like to a visitor from afar.

The cameras that took the images for the movie are located near the pointed tip of one of the spacecraft's three solar-array arms. They are part of Juno's Magnetic Field Investigation (MAG) and are normally used to determine the orientation of the magnetic sensors. These cameras look away from the sunlit side of the solar array, so as the spacecraft approached, the system's four cameras pointed toward Earth. Earth and the moon came into view when Juno was about 600,000 miles (966,000 kilometers) away -- about three times the Earth-moon separation.

During the flyby, timing was everything. Juno was traveling about twice as fast as a typical satellite, and the spacecraft itself was spinning at 2 rpm. To assemble a movie that wouldn't make viewers dizzy, the star tracker had to capture a frame each time the camera was facing Earth at exactly the right instant. The frames were sent to Earth, where they were processed into video format.


Offline Artyom.

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Re: NASA - Juno - Updates
« Reply #81 on: 12/12/2013 01:42 pm »
Hams Detected From Space by NASA's Juno Spacecraft

During its close flyby of Earth, NASA's Jupiter-bound Juno spacecraft listened for a communication from amateur radio operators transmitting from locations around the world. This video clip depicts results, the "dits" and the "dahs," of this high-flying social experiment.


Offline AJA

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Re: NASA - Juno - Updates
« Reply #82 on: 12/13/2013 10:37 am »
Apparently, those cameras can see all the way down to Magnitude +6.7, and can track minor bodies with a size down to 1 km. Now, given that Juno spent quite a lot of time beyond Mars orbit - i.e. close to the belt-, and will be doing so again (this time passing it) - have/could they use these cameras to image the asteroid belt, and pick up any small objects? To aid the NEO programs?
« Last Edit: 12/13/2013 10:39 am by AJA »

Offline Jonas Bjarnoe

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Re: NASA - Juno - Updates
« Reply #83 on: 12/18/2013 07:01 pm »
Yes we will indeed!
The microASC star tracker we delivered for Juno has a special non-stellar-object search mode, which pinpoints and tracks any faint object moving on the stellar background. We have had this mode engaged since the spacecraft recovered from the Earth flyby safe mode events, and we expect to continue the search for astroids all the way out to Jupiter. To help us in the search, the rotation rate of the Juno spacecraft has now been lowered to 1rpm. Along the way we will also be studying the zodiacal lights.

At Jupiter we further hope to do another movie of the approach to the planet which should be much better than the one of the Earth flyby. Having only a few percent of the solar illumination level at Jupiter as compared to 1AU, makes it possible for us to operate the microASC with larger shuttertimes without getting blinded. This will alleviate the blinding and intensity jitter we had in the Earth flyby movie. Also, when at Jupiter we have a unique opportunity to use the microASC to do a visual tomography of the planets gossamer ring system, should be a lot of fun so stay tuned!

BR's
Jonas
« Last Edit: 12/18/2013 07:03 pm by Jonas Bjarnoe »

Offline plutogno

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Re: NASA - Juno - Updates
« Reply #84 on: 12/19/2013 09:53 am »
very interesting Jonas, thank you. do you already have an idea of which known asteroids should be visible in the star tracker's field of view?

Offline Jonas Bjarnoe

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Re: NASA - Juno - Updates
« Reply #85 on: 12/19/2013 12:45 pm »
Well, Juno's trajectory won't bring any of the larger known astroids into our FOV, but to my appreciation this is the most exciting aspect of this experiment. The thing is, the astroid population and size distribution in the belts is very poorly known for all but the larger (>1km diameter) objects. If you look at the figure I've attached,  most everything we collectively claim to know about the number of small astroids out there is model based, not observation based.

With the observations on Juno we will be able to put some bounds on the number of smaller astroids. If we don't find any at all, the models will have to be changed. As the spacecraft spins the trackers will be covering a fairly large search volume, and as we move outwards with the Sun behind us we will be in a very favorable position to see quite dim objects (magn. 7-9) If we do find any... we'll have a chance to get creative naming them :-)

Offline plutogno

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Re: NASA - Juno - Updates
« Reply #86 on: 12/19/2013 12:54 pm »
do you also plan to use it in Jovian orbit? for example to track the smaller inner satellites? or the population of even smaller objects believed to exist from some Galileo star tracker observation during the Amalthea flyby?

Offline Jonas Bjarnoe

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Re: NASA - Juno - Updates
« Reply #87 on: 12/19/2013 02:54 pm »
I think for now the plan is to leave the non-stellar object tracker function enabled when we get into the science orbits. But we will probably be hard pressed to limit the amount of data we need to downlink. But we would sure like to add a few more small Jovian moons to the tally if we get the chance. I will have to check whether we will have Amalthea in our FOV at some point during the science orbits. Off the top of my head I can't remember.

Right now, we are one of the few instruments onboard that can perform meaningful cruise science, so we are getting a pretty comfortable downlink bandwidth allocation. When we get to Jupiter, that situation is bound to change as the spacecraft datarate will be lower, and all instruments will be vying for bandwidth. We will have to see how things evolve when we get there, but with a finite lifetime of 32 orbits rest assured that the operations team will keep the onboard radio glowing red hot to squeeze as much science as possible out of the mission.
 
« Last Edit: 12/19/2013 02:56 pm by Jonas Bjarnoe »

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Re: NASA - Juno - Updates
« Reply #88 on: 11/06/2015 02:01 am »
JUNO Mission to Jupiter - VON Karmen Lecture Series

Started on Nov 5, 2015
NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory invites you to watch live about everything from Mars rovers to monitoring asteroids to cool cosmic discoveries. From the lab to the lecture hall, get information directly from scientists and engineers working on NASA's latest missions.

LIVE session: Thursday Oct 5th, at 7 p.m. PST

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Offline zubenelgenubi

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Re: NASA - Juno - Updates
« Reply #89 on: 11/23/2015 12:25 am »
http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.php?feature=4648
July 7, 2015
With One Year to Jupiter, NASA's Juno Team Prepares

Fast Facts:
› Juno is on track for arrival on July 4, 2016
NASA recently approved updates to Juno's flight plan at Jupiter that help streamline the mission.
 (my bold)
› Scientists are monitoring Jupiter with Earth- and space-based telescopes to provide context for Juno's observations.

With just one year remaining in a five-year trek to Jupiter, the team of NASA's Juno mission is hard at work preparing for the spacecraft's expedition to the solar system's largest planet. The mission aims to reveal the story of Jupiter's formation and details of its interior structure. Data from Juno will provide insights about our solar system's beginnings, and what we learn from the mission will also enrich scientists' understanding of giant planets around other stars.

Juno is scheduled to arrive at Jupiter on July 4, 2016 (Pacific Daylight Time). Once it settles into orbit, the spacecraft will brave the hazards of Jupiter's intense radiation when it repeatedly approaches within a few thousand miles, or kilometers, of the cloud tops to collect its data.

Juno is the first mission dedicated to the study of a giant planet's interior, which it will do by mapping the planet's magnetic and gravity fields. The mission will also map the abundance of water vapor in the planet's atmosphere, providing the key to understanding which of several theories about the planet's formation is likely the correct one. In addition, Juno will travel through the previously unexplored region above the planet's poles, collecting the first images from there, along with data about electromagnetic forces and high-energy particles in the environment.

Although other spacecraft have previously visited Jupiter, the space around the planet is full of unknowns, especially the regions above the poles. With these challenges in mind, the Juno team has been busy fine-tuning their flight plan.

"We're already more than 90 percent of the way to Jupiter, in terms of total distance traveled," said Scott Bolton, Juno principal investigator at Southwest Research Institute, San Antonio. "With a year to go, we're looking carefully at our plans to make sure we're ready to make the most of our time once we arrive."

Following a detailed analysis by the Juno team, NASA recently approved changes to the mission's flight plan at Jupiter. Instead of taking 11 days to orbit the planet, Juno will now complete one revolution every 14 days. The difference in orbit period will be accomplished by having Juno execute a slightly shorter engine burn than originally planned.

The revised cadence will allow Juno to build maps of the planet's magnetic and gravity fields in a way that will provide a global look at the planet earlier in the mission than the original plan. Over successive orbits, Juno will build a virtual web around Jupiter, making its gravity and magnetic field maps as it passes over different longitudes from north to south. The original plan would have required 15 orbits to map these forces globally, with 15 more orbits filling in gaps to make the map complete. In the revised plan, Juno will get very basic mapping coverage in just eight orbits. A new level of detail will be added with each successive doubling of the number, at 16 and 32 orbits.

The slightly longer orbit also will provide a few extra days between close approaches to the planet for the team to react to unexpected conditions the spacecraft might experience in the complex environment very close to Jupiter.

"We have models that tell us what to expect, but the fact is that Juno is going to be immersed in a strong and variable magnetic field and hazardous radiation, and it will get closer to the planet than any previous orbiting spacecraft," said Bolton. "Juno's experience could be different than what our models predict -- that's part of what makes space exploration so exciting."

The revised plan lengthens Juno's mission at Jupiter to 20 months instead of the original 15, and the spacecraft will now complete 32 orbits instead of 30. But the extra time doesn't represent bonus science for the mission -- rather, it's an effect of the longer orbital period and the change in the way Juno builds its web around Jupiter. Basically, it will take Juno a bit longer to collect the full data set the mission is after, but it will get a low-resolution version of its final products earlier in the mission than originally planned.

NASA also recently approved a change to the spacecraft's initial orbit after Jupiter arrival, called the capture orbit. The revised plan splits the originally planned, 107-day-long capture orbit into two. The new approach will provide the Juno team a sneak preview of their science activities, affording them an opportunity to test the spacecraft's science instruments during a close approach to Jupiter before beginning the actual science phase of the mission. The original scenario called for an engine burn to ease Juno into Jupiter orbit, followed by a second burn 107 days later, putting the spacecraft into an 11-day science orbit. In the updated mission design, the orbit-insertion burn is followed 53.5 days later by a practice run at Jupiter with science instruments turned on, followed by another 53.5-day orbit before the final engine burn that places Juno into its new, 14-day science orbit.

In addition to myriad preparations being made on the engineering side, Juno's science team is also busy preparing to collect valuable data about the giant planet's inner workings. One piece of this science groundwork is a collection of images and spectra being obtained by powerful ground-based telescopes and NASA's Hubble Space Telescope (spectra are like chemical fingerprints of gases in the atmosphere). These data are intended to provide big-picture context for Juno's up-close observations of Jupiter, which is important for interpreting what the spacecraft's instruments will see.

With the countdown clock ticking -- this time, not toward launch, but toward arrival at their destination -- the Juno team is acutely aware of how quickly they're sneaking up on the giant planet. And their excitement is building.

"It's been a busy cruise, but the journey has provided our team with valuable experience flying the spacecraft and enhanced our confidence in Juno's design," said Rick Nybakken, Juno project manager at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California. "Now it's time to gear up for Jupiter."

Juno is the second mission chosen as part of NASA's New Frontiers program of frequent, medium-class spacecraft missions that address high-priority exploration initiatives in the solar system. NASA's New Horizons mission, which will soon encounter Pluto, is the first New Frontiers mission; OSIRIS-REx is next in the lineup, slated to launch in 2016.

NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, manages the Juno mission for the principal investigator, Scott Bolton, of Southwest Research Institute in San Antonio. The New Frontiers Program is managed at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama. Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver, built the spacecraft. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

For more information about Juno visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/juno

http://missionjuno.swri.edu
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Offline Targeteer

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Re: NASA - Juno - Updates
« Reply #90 on: 01/09/2016 12:50 am »
https://www.missionjuno.swri.edu/news/juno_mission_status_01082016

01.08.16
Mission Status
Where is Juno?

As of Jan. 8, 2016, Juno is approximately 457 million miles (735 million kilometers) from Earth. The one-way radio signal travel time between Earth and Juno is currently about 41 minutes.

Juno is traveling at a velocity of approximately 56,000 miles per hour (about 25 kilometers per second) relative to Earth, 17,000 miles per hour (about 7.6 kilometers per second) relative to the Sun, and 12,000 miles per hour (about 5.4 kilometers per second) relative to Jupiter. Juno has now travelled 1.69 billion miles (2.73 billion kilometers, or 18.23 AU) since launch, and has another 64 million miles to go (104 million kilometers, or 0.70 AU) before entering orbit around Jupiter.

The Juno spacecraft remains in excellent health and is operating nominally.

Juno is slated to arrive at the gas giant planet on July 4, 2016 (scheduled for 7:47 p.m. Pacific Time). Visualize Juno’s journey through space and get up-to-date data sets using NASA's Eyes on the Solar System 3D interactive.

Juno’s onboard color camera, called JunoCam, invites the public to serve as a virtual imaging team. Upload and comment on which pictures JunoCam will take when it reaches Jupiter using the new JunoCam web platform.

Did You Know?

At closest approach, Juno will pass only 3,100 miles (5,000 kilometers) above Jupiter’s cloud tops. If Jupiter were the size of a basketball, the equivalent distance would be only about one-third of an inch (0.8 centimeter).
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Offline Targeteer

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Re: NASA - Juno - Updates
« Reply #92 on: 02/03/2016 09:17 pm »
http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.php?feature=4889

NASA's solar-powered Juno spacecraft successfully executed a maneuver to adjust its flight path today, Feb. 3. The maneuver refined the spacecraft's trajectory, helping set the stage for Juno's arrival at the solar system's largest planetary inhabitant five months and a day from now.

"This is the first of two trajectory adjustments that fine tune Juno's orbit around the sun, perfecting our rendezvous with Jupiter on July 4th at 8:18 p.m. PDT [11:18 p.m. EDT]," said Scott Bolton, Juno principal investigator at the Southwest Research Institute in San Antonio.

The maneuver began at 10:38 a.m. PST (1:38 p.m. EST). The Juno spacecraft's thrusters fired for 35 minutes, consumed about 1.2 pounds (.56 kilograms) of fuel, and changed the spacecraft's speed by 1 foot (0.31 meters), per second. At the time of the maneuver, Juno was about 51 million miles (82 million kilometers) from Jupiter and approximately 425 million miles (684 million kilometers) from Earth. The next trajectory correction maneuver is scheduled for May 31.

Juno was launched on Aug. 5, 2011. The spacecraft will orbit the Jovian world 33 times, skimming to within 3,100 miles (5,000 kilometers) above the planet's cloud tops every 14 days. During the flybys, Juno will probe beneath the obscuring cloud cover of Jupiter and study its aurorae to learn more about the planet's origins, structure, atmosphere and magnetosphere.

Juno's name comes from Greek and Roman mythology. The god Jupiter drew a veil of clouds around himself to hide his mischief, and his wife -- the goddess Juno -- was able to peer through the clouds and reveal Jupiter's true nature.

NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, manages the Juno mission for the principal investigator, Scott Bolton, of Southwest Research Institute in San Antonio. Juno is part of NASA's New Frontiers Program, which is managed at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, for NASA's Science Mission Directorate. Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver, built the spacecraft. The California Institute of Technology in Pasadena manages JPL for NASA.

For more information about Juno visit these sites:

http://www.nasa.gov/juno

http://missionjuno.swri.edu
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Offline jacqmans

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Re: NASA - Juno - Updates
« Reply #93 on: 04/29/2016 08:59 pm »
April 29, 2016
RELEASE M16-048

NASA’s Juno Mission on Course for July 4 Arrival at Jupiter, Media Accreditation Open

Media accreditation now is open for events around the arrival of NASA’s Juno spacecraft at Jupiter on July 4. The spacecraft, which will reveal the story of the formation and evolution of the planet Jupiter, will enter into orbit around the gas giant that evening, five years after leaving Earth.

The event and related news conferences will be carried live on NASA Television and the agency's website. Further details and updates will be announced as they become available.

To cover Juno arrival events at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in Pasadena, California, media can begin the process of applying for credentials by sending all of the following information to: [email protected].

•Your name (as spelled on your driver’s license with middle name), title, phone number and work email
•Country of citizenship
•If not a U.S. citizen, are you a green card holder?
•Media outlet name, address, phone number, and website
•Editor's name, phone number and work email

To allow time for processing and approval, foreign nationals and representatives of foreign media outlets must apply by May 11. U.S. citizens and green card holders representing U.S. media outlets must apply by June 2. For more information about media accreditation, contact Elena Mejia at 818-354-1712 or [email protected].

Media should confirm they have been credentialed before making travel arrangements. Credentialed media will have access to interview, photo and b-roll opportunities, and media briefings before and after spacecraft orbital insertion. The JPL Juno newsroom will open on June 30.

Juno will make two 53-day elliptical laps around Jupiter, before beginning the mission's science phase. At that point, the spacecraft will begin orbiting the Jovian world every 14 days, from a distance as close as 3,100 miles (5,000 kilometers). It will peer beneath Jupiter's cloud tops to learn about the planet's origins, composition and magnetosphere. Jupiter lies in the harshest radiation environment in our solar system, so this particular spacecraft orbit insertion will mark a new achievement in planetary exploration.

JPL manages the Juno mission for NASA. The principal investigator for the mission is Scott Bolton, of Southwest Research Institute in San Antonio. The Juno mission is part of the New Frontiers Program managed by NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama for the agency’s Science Mission Directorate. Lockheed Martin Space Systems, in Denver, built the spacecraft. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

More information about the Juno mission is available at:

http://www.nasa.gov/juno
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Re: NASA - Juno - Updates
« Reply #94 on: 05/06/2016 09:45 pm »
https://www.missionjuno.swri.edu/news/mission-status-may-6-2016


Mission Status : 05.06.2016

As of May 6, 2016, Juno is approximately 450 million miles (724 million kilometers) from Earth. The one-way radio signal travel time between Earth and Juno is currently about 40 minutes.

Juno is traveling at a velocity of approximately 60,000 miles per hour (about 26.9 kilometers per second) relative to Earth, 15,000 miles per hour (about 6.7 kilometers per second) relative to the Sun, and 13,000 miles per hour (about 6 kilometers per second) relative to Jupiter. Juno has now travelled 1.74 billion miles (2.8 billion kilometers, or 18.73 AU) since launch, and has another 19 million miles to go (31 million kilometers, or 0.20 AU) before entering orbit around Jupiter.

The Juno spacecraft is in excellent health and is operating nominally.

Juno will arrive at Jupiter on July 4, 2016, at 8:35 p.m. PDT (Earth Received Time). Track and visualize Juno’s journey through space using NASA's Eyes on the Solar System 3D interactive.

Juno’s onboard color camera, called JunoCam, invites the public to serve as a virtual imaging team. Vote and comment on where to point JunoCam and which features to image on Jupiter using the new JunoCam web platform on this site.

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Re: NASA - Juno - Updates
« Reply #95 on: 05/28/2016 12:11 am »
http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.php?feature=6520

   

Since its launch five years ago, there have been three forces tugging at NASA's Juno spacecraft as it speeds through the solar system. The sun, Earth and Jupiter have all been influential -- a gravitational trifecta of sorts. At times, Earth was close enough to be the frontrunner. More recently, the sun has had the most clout when it comes to Juno's trajectory. Today, it can be reported that Jupiter is now in the gravitational driver's seat, and the basketball court-sized spacecraft is not looking back.

"Today the gravitational influence of Jupiter is neck and neck with that of the sun," said Rick Nybakken, Juno project manager at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California. "As of tomorrow, and for the rest of the mission, we project Jupiter's gravity will dominate as the trajectory-perturbing effects by other celestial bodies are reduced to insignificant roles."

Juno was launched on Aug. 5, 2011. On July 4 of this year, it will perform a Jupiter orbit insertion maneuver -- a 35-minute burn of its main engine, which will impart a mean change in velocity of 1,212 mph (542 meters per second) on the spacecraft. Once in orbit, the spacecraft will circle the Jovian world 37 times, skimming to within 3,100 miles (5,000 kilometers) above the planet's cloud tops. During the flybys, Juno will probe beneath the obscuring cloud cover of Jupiter and study its auroras to learn more about the planet's origins, structure, atmosphere and magnetosphere.

Juno's name comes from Greek and Roman mythology. The mythical god Jupiter drew a veil of clouds around himself to hide his mischief, and his wife -- the goddess Juno -- was able to peer through the clouds and reveal Jupiter's true nature.

NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, manages the Juno mission for the principal investigator, Scott Bolton, of Southwest Research Institute in San Antonio. Juno is part of NASA's New Frontiers Program, which is managed at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, for NASA's Science Mission Directorate. Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver, built the spacecraft. The California Institute of Technology in Pasadena manages JPL for NASA.

For more information about Juno visit these sites:

http://www.nasa.gov/juno
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Re: NASA - Juno - Updates
« Reply #96 on: 06/02/2016 11:16 pm »

NASA Announces Coverage, Media Activities for Juno Mission Arrival at Jupiter

June 02, 2016
MEDIA ADVISORY M16-063


This Fourth of July, NASA’s solar-powered Juno spacecraft will arrive at Jupiter after an almost five-year journey. News briefings, photo opportunities and other media events will be held at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in Pasadena, California, and air live on NASA Television and the agency’s website.

In the evening of July 4, Juno will perform a suspenseful orbit insertion maneuver, a 35-minute burn of its main engine, to slow the spacecraft by about 1,212 miles per hour (542 meters per second) so it can be captured into the gas giant’s orbit. Once in Jupiter’s orbit, the spacecraft will circle the Jovian world 37 times during 20 months, skimming to within 3,100 miles (5,000 kilometers) above the cloud tops. This is the first time a spacecraft will orbit the poles of Jupiter, providing new answers to ongoing mysteries about the planet’s core, composition and magnetic fields.

NASA TV Events Schedule

For all media briefings, reporters may ask questions by phone by contacting Gina Fontes at 818-354-9380 or [email protected]. All times are Eastern.

Thursday, June 16
2 p.m. -- Mission status briefing at NASA Headquarters in Washington

Thursday, June 30
4 p.m. -- Mission overview news briefing at JPL
5 p.m. -- Mission outreach briefing at JPL

Monday, July 4 – Orbit Insertion Day
Noon -- Pre-orbit insertion briefing at JPL
10:30 p.m. -- Orbit insertion and NASA TV commentary begin

Tuesday, July 5
1 a.m. -- Post-orbit insertion briefing at JPL

To watch all of these events online, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/nasatv

http://www.ustream.tv/nasa

http://www.ustream.tv/nasajpl

Live coverage on orbit insertion day also will be available online via Facebook Live at:

http://www.facebook.com/nasa

http://www.facebook.com/nasajpl

Accreditation

To cover these events from JPL, media must apply for accreditation with the JPL Media Relations Office. The deadline for U.S. citizens and green card holders representing U.S. media outlets is Saturday, June 4. The deadline for foreign nationals and representatives of foreign media has passed.

To apply for accreditation, send the following information to [email protected]: full name (as on driver’s license), title, phone number and work email; country of citizenship; media outlet name, address, phone number and website; and, editor's name, phone number and work email. Also, if you are not a U.S. citizen, you must specify whether you are green card holder.

Beginning June 30, media credentials may be picked up at JPL Visitor Reception, located at 4800 Oak Grove Dr., between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. PDT. On July 4, operating hours are 8 a.m. to midnight. U.S. media must present a valid form of identification, with a photo, to obtain credentials. Non-U.S. citizens must present a passport and visa or permanent resident alien registration card.

JPL Tours

On June 30 and July 1, tours are available to media at JPL of the Juno mission control area. Space is limited and will be filled on a first-come, first-served basis. Media wishing to join a tour must have a JPL media credential and must make a reservation with the JPL Media Relations Office at 818-354-5011, or sign up in person at the JPL Newsroom.

Resources

An uninterrupted, clean feed of cameras from JPL mission control, with mission audio only, will be available on the NASA TV Media Channel and NASA’s Ustream channel at:

http://www.ustream.tv/nasajpl2

B-roll for the Juno mission is available for download at:

www.youtube.com/jplraw

https://vimeo.com/jplraw

JPL manages the Juno mission for NASA. The mission’s principal investigator is Scott Bolton of Southwest Research Institute in San Antonio. The mission is part of NASA's New Frontiers Program, managed at the agency’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, for NASA's Science Mission Directorate. Lockheed Martin Space Systems in Denver built the spacecraft.

Learn more about the June mission, and get an up-to-date schedule of events, at:

http://www.nasa.gov/juno

https://solarsystem.nasa.gov/planets/jupiter/junotoolkit

Follow the mission on social media at:

http://www.facebook.com/NASAJuno

http://www.twitter.com/NASAJuno

For NASA TV streaming video, schedule and downlink information, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/nasatv

-end-

Photo Credit:  NASA
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Offline jacqmans

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Re: NASA - Juno - Updates
« Reply #97 on: 06/14/2016 06:46 am »
June 13, 2016
MEDIA ADVISORY M16-070

NASA Spacecraft Closing in on Jupiter, Media Briefing to Discuss July 4 Arrival

NASA will host a media briefing at 2 p.m. EDT on Thursday, June 16, to discuss the agency’s Juno spacecraft and its July 4th arrival at Jupiter.

The briefing will be held in the James Webb Auditorium at NASA Headquarters, 300 E Street SW, Washington, and broadcast live on NASA Television and the agency's website.

The solar-powered spacecraft will perform a suspenseful Jupiter orbit insertion maneuver -- a 35-minute burn of its main engine -- which will slow Juno by about 1,200 mph (542 meters per second) so it can be captured into the gas giant’s polar orbit. Juno will loop Jupiter 37 times during 20 months, skimming to within 3,100 miles (5,000 kilometers) above its swirling cloud tops.

Juno will provide answers to ongoing mysteries about Jupiter’s core, composition and magnetic fields, and provide new clues about the origins of our solar system.

The briefing participants will be:

·      Diane Brown, Juno mission program executive, NASA Headquarters, Washington

·      Scott Bolton, Juno principal investigator, Southwest Research Institute, San Antonio

·      Rick Nybakken, Juno project manager, Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), Pasadena, California

·      Heidi Becker, radiation monitoring investigation lead, JPL

·      Alberto Adriani, Juno co-investigator, Instituto di Astrofisica e Planetologia Spaziali, Rome

Media may ask questions during the event on site and by phone. Members of the public also can ask questions on social media using #AskNASA.

To participate in the briefing by phone, media must email their name, media affiliation and phone number to Laurie Cantillo at [email protected] by 1 p.m. Thursday.

For NASA TV downlink information and schedules, and to view the news briefing, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/nasatv

More information about the Juno mission is available at:

http://www.nasa.gov/juno
Jacques :-)

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Re: NASA - Juno - Updates
« Reply #98 on: 06/16/2016 03:28 am »
JOI: Into the Unknown (NASA Juno Mission Trailer)

Published on Jun 15, 2016
NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory

Secrets lie deep within Jupiter, shrouded in the solar system's strongest magnetic field and most lethal radiation belts. On July 4, 2016, NASA's Juno spacecraft will plunge into uncharted territory, entering orbit around the gas giant and passing closer than any spacecraft before. Juno will see Jupiter for what it really is, but first it must pass the trial of orbit insertion. For more information: http://www.nasa.gov/juno and http://missionjuno.swri.edu



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Re: NASA - Juno - Updates
« Reply #99 on: 06/17/2016 07:51 am »
June 16, 2016
RELEASE 16-063

NASA’s Juno Spacecraft to Risk Jupiter’s Fireworks for Science


On July 4, NASA will fly a solar-powered spacecraft the size of a basketball court within 2,900 miles (4,667 kilometers) of the cloud tops of our solar system’s largest planet.

As of Thursday, Juno is 18 days and 8.6 million miles (13.8 million kilometers) from Jupiter. On the evening of July 4, Juno will fire its main engine for 35 minutes, placing it into a polar orbit around the gas giant. During the flybys, Juno will probe beneath the obscuring cloud cover of Jupiter and study its auroras to learn more about the planet's origins, structure, atmosphere and magnetosphere.

"At this time last year our New Horizons spacecraft was closing in for humanity’s first close views of Pluto,” said Diane Brown, Juno program executive at NASA Headquarters in Washington. “Now, Juno is poised to go closer to Jupiter than any spacecraft ever before to unlock the mysteries of what lies within.”

A series of 37 planned close approaches during the mission will eclipse the previous record for Jupiter set in 1974 by NASA’s Pioneer 11 spacecraft of 27,000 miles (43,000 kilometers). Getting this close to Jupiter does not come without a price -- one that will be paid each time Juno's orbit carries it toward the swirling tumult of orange, white, red and brown clouds that cover the gas giant.

"We are not looking for trouble, we are looking for data," said Scott Bolton, principal investigator of Juno from the Southwest Research Institute in San Antonio. "Problem is, at Jupiter, looking for the kind of data Juno is looking for, you have to go in the kind of neighborhoods where you could find trouble pretty quick."

The source of potential trouble can be found inside Jupiter itself. Well below the Jovian cloud tops is a layer of hydrogen under such incredible pressure it acts as an electrical conductor. Scientists believe that the combination of this metallic hydrogen along with Jupiter's fast rotation -- one day on Jupiter is only 10 hours long -- generates a powerful magnetic field that surrounds the planet with electrons, protons and ions traveling at nearly the speed of light. The endgame for any spacecraft that enters this doughnut-shaped field of high-energy particles is an encounter with the harshest radiation environment in the solar system.

"Over the life of the mission, Juno will be exposed to the equivalent of over 100 million dental X-rays," said Rick Nybakken, Juno's project manager from NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in Pasadena, California. "But, we are ready. We designed an orbit around Jupiter that minimizes exposure to Jupiter’s harsh radiation environment. This orbit allows us to survive long enough to obtain the tantalizing science data that we have traveled so far to get.”

Juno's orbit resembles a flattened oval. Its design is courtesy of the mission's navigators, who came up with a trajectory that approaches Jupiter over its north pole and quickly drops to an altitude below the planet's radiation belts as Juno races toward Jupiter's south pole. Each close flyby of the planet is about one Earth day in duration. Then Juno's orbit will carry the spacecraft below its south pole and away from Jupiter, well beyond the reach of harmful radiation.

While Juno is replete with special radiation-hardened electrical wiring and shielding surrounding its myriad of sensors, the highest profile piece of armor Juno carries is a first-of-its-kind titanium vault, which contains the spacecraft's flight computer and the electronic hearts of many of its science instruments. Weighing in at almost 400 pounds (172 kilograms), the vault will reduce the exposure to radiation by 800 times of that outside of its titanium walls.

Without the vault, Juno’s electronic brain would more than likely fry before the end of the very first flyby of the planet. But, while 400 pounds of titanium can do magical things, it can't do it forever in an extreme radiation environment like that on Jupiter. The quantity and energy of the high-energy particles is just too much. However, Juno’s special orbit allows the radiation dose and the degradation to accumulate slowly, allowing Juno to do a remarkable amount of science for 20 months.

“Over the course of the mission, the highest energy electrons will penetrate the vault, creating a spray of secondary photons and particles,” said Heidi Becker, Juno’s Radiation Monitoring Investigation lead. “The constant bombardment will break the atomic bonds in Juno’s electronics.”

The Juno spacecraft launched Aug. 5, 2011 from Cape Canaveral, Florida. JPL manages the Juno mission for the principal investigator, Scott Bolton, of Southwest Research Institute in San Antonio. Juno is part of NASA's New Frontiers Program, which is managed at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, for NASA's Science Mission Directorate. Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver, built the spacecraft. The California Institute of Technology in Pasadena manages JPL for NASA.

More information on the Juno mission is available at:

http://www.nasa.gov/juno

The public can follow the mission on Facebook and Twitter at:

http://www.facebook.com/NASAJuno

http://www.twitter.com/NASAJuno
Jacques :-)

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