Author Topic: Gilmour Space Technologies  (Read 132733 times)

Offline Steven Pietrobon

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Re: Gilmour Space Technologies
« Reply #340 on: 03/08/2024 05:56 am »
Here's the press release from the ASA.

https://www.space.gov.au/news-and-media/historic-licence-for-queensland-spaceport?utm_source=eDM&utm_campaign=space_agency_sep_2022

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Historic licence for Queensland spaceport

5 March 2024
Historic licence for Queensland spaceport

Gilmour Space has been granted a launch facility licence for its Bowen Orbital Spaceport in north Queensland.

The licence, issued by Minister for Industry and Science Ed Husic, is the first for an orbital launch facility in Australia. The Spaceport is located within the Abbot Point State Development Area.

The Queensland-based rocket manufacturer and launch services provider is planning the first test flight of its three-stage Eris rocket this year.

Gilmour Space still requires a separate launch permit for Eris TestFlight 1. It is working with the Agency’s Office of the Space Regulator to demonstrate the launch satisfies the criteria of the Space (Launches and Returns) Act 2018.

The Eris Block 1 launch vehicle contains a hybrid propulsion system for the first and second stages, and a liquid propulsion system for the third stage.

Gilmour Space is engaging with the Juru traditional owners, as well as other local stakeholders, regarding the use of the launch facility.

Update 9 March. I'm not sure what went wrong with the images I attached in my post, but they were not showing up correctly. I've reuploaded them and they now appear to be showing correctly.
« Last Edit: 03/09/2024 12:18 am by Steven Pietrobon »
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Offline edzieba

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Re: Gilmour Space Technologies
« Reply #341 on: 03/08/2024 11:25 am »
I'm pretty sure the "3D printed grain" was nothing more than a differentiator for marketing purposes.
As with solid motors, there are potential advantages to 3D printed vs. cast grains.
First, grain cavity geometry determines the thrust-over-time curve of the motor. The more complex that cavity geometry, the harder it is to cast (and still get the mould core out).
Second, cast grains need to be inspected for internal voids after casting and setting, whereas 3D printed grains can be inspected continuously during material laydown.
The downside is there is plenty of industry knowledge on and experience of the manufacture and behaviour of monolithic cast grains and segmented cast grains, but not so with 3D printed grains.

Offline Lampyridae

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Re: Gilmour Space Technologies
« Reply #342 on: 03/08/2024 11:26 am »
Gilmour so far has only published hilarious nonsense launch dates. Now that they say April 2024, I can hardly believe that this is a true schedule (though this date may have helped raising funds).

Is there any indication that they have tested and qualified rocket stages? This is a process which usually takes > 1 year, starting with first hot-fire of the upper stage.

I don’t know enough about historical rocketry to be able to understand the full implications of the hybrid rocket motor as it relates to engine testing and stage qualification. Hybrid meaning LOX plus a “proprietary 3D printed solid rocket fuel”. My understanding is that the point is to have the isp of solid rockets but the throttleability of liquid rockets. But maybe it comes with some of the downsides of solids too.

I am also curious if hybrid thruster designs present different options for in space propulsion. Would be cool if solid cartridges of fuel could be shipped as payloads in missions where isru is planned. Then you only have to worry about making the LOX.

In any case, word on the grapevine is that these more recent NETs are much more plausible.

I have no hard evidence for believing this, but there are indicators - like these notorious BS launch dates, overall unprofessional appearence, and where are the stage tests? With best wishes to all Aussie space enthusiasts that I am sensing wrong here.

I wouldn’t read too much into the “unprofessional appearance”. We Aussies do love keeping it casual.


And if people think that's casual. you should see South African hardware. I think we're culturally encoded to find the ugliest optimal design for *everything.*

(Though this is a Jericho III from Israel repurposed for "peaceful exploration of space" by the Apartheid government and "totally not for nukes", it certainly isn't well looked after :P)

Edit: seems the photo got eaten by the interwebz
« Last Edit: 03/11/2024 12:25 pm by Lampyridae »

Offline plugger.lockett

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Re: Gilmour Space Technologies
« Reply #343 on: 03/11/2024 12:20 am »
The Eris launch vehicle has hybrid first and second stages and a kerolox thirds stage. If it reaches orbit, I believe it will be the first hybrid rocket to do so.
Sure, but what I was trying to say is that I'm unsure if they're still 3D printing their grains for the hybrid.

Unless you're pointing the rocket at New Zealand, I think the worst that would happen is that you get a big fine.
I've been told it's a criminal offense. In fairness though, neither one of us is in the position to test this.

Offline plugger.lockett

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Re: Gilmour Space Technologies
« Reply #344 on: 03/11/2024 12:26 am »
I'm pretty sure the "3D printed grain" was nothing more than a differentiator for marketing purposes.
As with solid motors, there are potential advantages to 3D printed vs. cast grains.
First, grain cavity geometry determines the thrust-over-time curve of the motor. The more complex that cavity geometry, the harder it is to cast (and still get the mould core out).
Second, cast grains need to be inspected for internal voids after casting and setting, whereas 3D printed grains can be inspected continuously during material laydown.
The downside is there is plenty of industry knowledge on and experience of the manufacture and behaviour of monolithic cast grains and segmented cast grains, but not so with 3D printed grains.
I get that, I've got a mate currently experimenting with different 3D printed geometries in hybrid motors. But I'm not aware of any complexity around the Gilmour 3D printed grains, just that they were doing that. It was the closest thing to a "secret sauce" they had at the start of their journey. But nothing has been said about it for ages?
Regardless, I'm not convinced it's a 'game changer', hence my comment about a marketing differentiator. It sounds impressive but doesn't do much more than that. Maybe they can apply some AI to the 3D printing to make it even better for sourcing VC funds? /s

Offline CameronD

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Re: Gilmour Space Technologies
« Reply #345 on: 03/19/2024 11:03 pm »
TSA reduces Aussies to ‘making coffee’, says Gilmour ...but it seems Southern Launch and ELA don't agree.

https://www.spaceconnectonline.com.au/launch/6155-tsa-reduces-aussies-to-making-coffee-says-gilmour

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Australia currently has several launch sites preparing to blast off rockets, including ELA’s Arnhem Space Centre in the Northern Territory, Southern Launch’s Orbital Launch Complex in SA and Gilmour’s Bowen Orbital Spaceport in Queensland.

Gilmour’s differs because it will predominantly specialise in providing its own rockets to blast off satellites, unlike ELA’s which is actively signing up client’s own launch vehicles. Gilmour is currently targeting the first test launch of its Eris launch vehicle as early as next month.

Can't wait!  Somebody pass the popcorn.. 8)
With sufficient thrust, pigs fly just fine - however, this is not necessarily a good idea. It is hard to be sure where they are
going to land, and it could be dangerous sitting under them as they fly overhead.

Offline plugger.lockett

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Re: Gilmour Space Technologies
« Reply #346 on: 03/22/2024 05:10 am »
ELA and Southern Launch are launch providers without much of a customer base, so it makes sense they'd want existing US launchers to ustilise their facilities here and profit from that activity.
Gilmour is a little different here, but this legislation (in my opinion) doesn't affect them as they're aiming to be a domestic launch provider with their own infrastructure wholly separate from US projects. I don't see how it would interfere with their activities in any tangible way.
I wonder if this tune will change if/when they have Bowen stood up and not a lot to launch from there...

I have my own misgivings about this legislation. In effect it seems to be imposing ITAR on Australian Citizens, which I'm not supportive of at all.

Offline Int.RocketLaunches

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Re: Gilmour Space Technologies
« Reply #347 on: 03/25/2024 08:12 am »
Countdown: Gilmour quietly steps toward the vertical

https://www.innovationaus.com/countdown-gilmour-quietly-steps-toward-the-vertical/

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Gilmour Space Technologies expects to lift its Eris rocket to its vertical position on the launchpad for the first time in the next ten days as the company quietly moves the three-stage launch vehicle toward its first test flight in the coming weeks.

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And while Michelle Gilmour is “hopeful” that the company will get a launch permit for the Eris test flight in the next two weeks, she says its in the hands of the Space Agency.

Quote
In the meantime, Gilmour Space is on the move on the Gold Coast, consolidating three factory/office and storage spaces into a single headquarters facility.

The move includes the relocation of significant plant and equipment will take place over the coming months with the company expecting to have everyone in the new 10,000 square metre Yatala facility at the back end of May.
« Last Edit: 03/25/2024 08:13 am by Int.RocketLaunches »

Offline Metalskin

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Re: Gilmour Space Technologies
« Reply #348 on: 03/25/2024 08:32 pm »
Well, at least if they grow, Yatala is easy to get to for photos :-)
How inappropriate to call this planet Earth when it is quite clearly Ocean. - Arthur C. Clarke

Offline CameronD

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Re: Gilmour Space Technologies
« Reply #349 on: 03/25/2024 11:43 pm »
Well, at least if they grow, Yatala is easy to get to for photos :-)

And just down the road from the Beenleigh Run Distillery.  Rocket fuel, anyone?  8)
With sufficient thrust, pigs fly just fine - however, this is not necessarily a good idea. It is hard to be sure where they are
going to land, and it could be dangerous sitting under them as they fly overhead.

Offline Metalskin

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Re: Gilmour Space Technologies
« Reply #350 on: 03/26/2024 01:52 am »
Well, at least if they grow, Yatala is easy to get to for photos :-)

And just down the road from the Beenleigh Run Distillery.  Rocket fuel, anyone?  8)

More importantly, a stones throw from Yatala Pies. Never quite the same since they expanded, but still damn good!
How inappropriate to call this planet Earth when it is quite clearly Ocean. - Arthur C. Clarke

Offline c4fusion

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Re: Gilmour Space Technologies
« Reply #351 on: 03/26/2024 01:08 pm »
Well, at least if they grow, Yatala is easy to get to for photos :-)

And just down the road from the Beenleigh Run Distillery.  Rocket fuel, anyone?  8)

Very tempted, but I am definitely coming if they get a launch license.


Offline CameronD

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Re: Gilmour Space Technologies
« Reply #353 on: 04/04/2024 10:21 pm »
Well, there's nothing quite like building the place and rolling out the hardware to gain pollies support (the old "build it and they will come").  Something Southern Launch failed to do due lack of money.  :'(

Hopefully this will work for them, because it'll be a mighty big embarrassment if it doesn't.   
With sufficient thrust, pigs fly just fine - however, this is not necessarily a good idea. It is hard to be sure where they are
going to land, and it could be dangerous sitting under them as they fly overhead.

Offline edkyle99

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Re: Gilmour Space Technologies
« Reply #354 on: 04/04/2024 11:25 pm »
Once upon a time, there was another company that tried hybrid propulsion.  It didn't end well, unfortunately, though Amroc's work kind of filtered down to SpaceShipOne, etc..  I hope that Gilmour has more luck!  It shouldn't be about the first launch.  Amroc ended not so much because of the test failure but because its founder, George Koopman, died in a car accident, I think.  Also, it was 1989, long before commercial space had leverage.

 - Ed Kyle
« Last Edit: 04/04/2024 11:35 pm by edkyle99 »

Offline Steven Pietrobon

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Re: Gilmour Space Technologies
« Reply #355 on: 04/05/2024 05:38 am »
Here's a link to a presentation given by Koopman. He died in a car accident in July 1989, before the failed suborbital launch of SET 1 on 5 October 1989 shown in the photos above.

https://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=6026.0;attach=17028

Here's a video of the failed attempt!

« Last Edit: 04/05/2024 05:41 am by Steven Pietrobon »
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Offline catdlr

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Re: Gilmour Space Technologies
« Reply #356 on: 04/05/2024 06:26 am »
Here's a link to a presentation given by Koopman. He died in a car accident in July 1989, before the failed suborbital launch of SET 1 on 5 October 1989 shown in the photos above.

https://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=6026.0;attach=17028

Here's a video of the failed attempt!



Stephen,

This animation from the video sure reminds me of some other water pressure-based system being developed by
ARCA SPACE.

Best,
Tony
« Last Edit: 04/05/2024 06:38 am by catdlr »
It's Tony De La Rosa, ...I don't create this stuff, I just report it.

Offline Int.RocketLaunches

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« Last Edit: 04/05/2024 09:55 am by Int.RocketLaunches »

Offline MickQ

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Re: Gilmour Space Technologies
« Reply #358 on: 04/12/2024 04:18 am »
I heard today on ABC radio that the rocket has gone vertical for the first time.

Offline catdlr

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Re: Gilmour Space Technologies
« Reply #359 on: 04/12/2024 04:25 am »
I heard today on ABC radio that the rocket has gone vertical for the first time.

https://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=60477.msg2584991#msg2584991
It's Tony De La Rosa, ...I don't create this stuff, I just report it.

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