Author Topic: Xuntian Space Telescope - CZ-5B - WSLC - 2023  (Read 7401 times)

Online newfrontiers

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Xuntian Space Telescope - CZ-5B - WSLC - 2023
« on: 12/28/2021 03:50 am »
Thread for China's Xuntian Space Telescope.
« Last Edit: 06/28/2022 05:57 pm by Satori »

Online newfrontiers

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Re: Xuntian Space Telescope
« Reply #1 on: 05/05/2022 01:23 pm »

Offline Vahe231991

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Re: Xuntian Space Telescope
« Reply #2 on: 06/24/2022 02:54 pm »
https://english.cas.cn/newsroom/cas_media/202205/t20220507_305162.shtml

The launch of the Xuntian Space Telescope is scheduled for next year, as noted in this article. How do the intended capabilities of the Xuntian telescope compare with those of the Hubble Space Telescope and the James Webb Space Telescope?

Offline edzieba

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Re: Xuntian Space Telescope
« Reply #3 on: 06/24/2022 05:15 pm »
It's a wide-field survey telescope, so is more comparable to NGRST than Hubble or Webb.

Offline leisure

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Re: Xuntian Space Telescope
« Reply #4 on: 06/24/2022 11:10 pm »
The heigth is 14m and width is 23.6m(direction of soar panels )

Offline leovinus

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Re: Xuntian Space Telescope
« Reply #5 on: 06/27/2022 05:28 pm »
https://english.cas.cn/newsroom/cas_media/202205/t20220507_305162.shtml

The launch of the Xuntian Space Telescope is scheduled for next year, as noted in this article. How do the intended capabilities of the Xuntian telescope compare with those of the Hubble Space Telescope and the James Webb Space Telescope?
The link is dead. Do you have a copy of the article maybe?

Offline leovinus

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Re: Xuntian Space Telescope
« Reply #6 on: 06/27/2022 05:29 pm »
A bit of searching on 巡天 "xuntian" leads us a.o. to a Chinese Wiki page with more details.

Quote
The Sky Survey Optical Module , also known as the Sky Survey Space Telescope, is one of the components of China's Tiangong Space Station , but it will not be connected all the time, but will fly in co - orbital configuration with the main part of the Tiangong Space Station for a long time . It will also be China's first large-scale astronomical telescope set up in extraterrestrial space .

I found it interesting that the telescope was originally thought to be a fixed part of the TianGong spacestation (good for maintenance, bad for field of view) and now seems to be conceived since 2015 as free flying telescope, co-orbital with the Chinese space station, and with option of docking to it for maintenance. See Wiki article for details.

Quote
in 2015, a new sky survey plan was proposed, and it was decided to directly build a space telescope, which is known as the "Sky Survey" [4] . On the other hand, it is convenient to dock the space station for on-orbit maintenance, but the orbit is relatively low and the resistance is large. However, the on-orbit docking maintenance scheme of the sky survey module is more convenient than the Hubble telescope maintained by the space shuttle, and the maintenance cost is also much lower.

For another thread of what might have been - can you image what a Hubble would have looked like, with easy docking to the ISS for maintenance and upgrades?
« Last Edit: 06/27/2022 05:33 pm by leovinus »

Offline JayWee

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Re: Xuntian Space Telescope
« Reply #7 on: 06/27/2022 06:41 pm »
If it was hard-docket to the station, could vibration be an issue for observation?
When it's near a station, wouldn't contamination be an issue? They took it very seriously during the Shuttle HST servicing missions.

Offline Vahe231991

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Re: Xuntian Space Telescope
« Reply #8 on: 06/27/2022 06:46 pm »
https://english.cas.cn/newsroom/cas_media/202205/t20220507_305162.shtml

The launch of the Xuntian Space Telescope is scheduled for next year, as noted in this article. How do the intended capabilities of the Xuntian telescope compare with those of the Hubble Space Telescope and the James Webb Space Telescope?
The link is dead. Do you have a copy of the article maybe?
The cited link isn't dead, it's active. There's a better link containing the same Xinhua article about the Xuntian Space Telescope:
http://www.china.org.cn/china/Off_the_Wire/2022-05/05/content_78202185.htm

Offline leovinus

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Re: Xuntian Space Telescope
« Reply #9 on: 06/27/2022 07:06 pm »
https://english.cas.cn/newsroom/cas_media/202205/t20220507_305162.shtml

The launch of the Xuntian Space Telescope is scheduled for next year, as noted in this article. How do the intended capabilities of the Xuntian telescope compare with those of the Hubble Space Telescope and the James Webb Space Telescope?
The link is dead. Do you have a copy of the article maybe?
The cited link isn't dead, it's active. There's a better link containing the same Xinhua article about the Xuntian Space Telescope:
http://www.china.org.cn/china/Off_the_Wire/2022-05/05/content_78202185.htm
Thank you. Initially that link did not work either. Seems like both sites do not like connections via my VPN. Attached the PDF of the article for reference.

Offline whitelancer64

Re: Xuntian Space Telescope
« Reply #10 on: 06/27/2022 07:34 pm »
If it was hard-docket to the station, could vibration be an issue for observation?
When it's near a station, wouldn't contamination be an issue? They took it very seriously during the Shuttle HST servicing missions.

I would presume it is very likely to not be taking any observations while docked to the space station. Very likely the aperture door will be closed to avoid damage / contamination of the primary mirror and other internal components.

*edit to add* Just like the Hubble did during proximity operations during the Shuttle servicing missions.
« Last Edit: 06/27/2022 07:37 pm by whitelancer64 »
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Offline Satori

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Re: Xuntian Space Telescope
« Reply #11 on: 06/28/2022 05:55 pm »
The thread should only be moved to the Space Science Coverage section after launch.

Offline zubenelgenubi

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Re: Xuntian Space Telescope - CZ-5B - WSLC - 2023
« Reply #12 on: 06/28/2022 07:16 pm »
No, it's a program thread in the time before the launch campaign, and in the time after launch, for the equipment deploys and checkout, and the science gathering.

Program threads belong in the space science  section, and that is what this thread is currently.  Launch is next year.

Launch threads are for the launch campaign.

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Offline Don2

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Re: Xuntian Space Telescope - CZ-5B - WSLC - 2023
« Reply #13 on: 06/29/2022 03:48 am »
This is a very interesting, very capable and possibly overambitious project.

The telescope has a 2m mirror, and appears to cover the uv-visible wavelength band. The sensors are quoted as being 81 megapixels (9000*9000 if square), which is larger than anything I have read about in US or European projects. It has a 2.5 gigapixel camera, and a field of view 300-350 times larger than Hubble.

For comparison, the Roman space telescope 300 megapixel camera covering the visible to near-infrared (0.48-2.3 micron) band. Euclid has a 600 megapixel camera covering 550-920 nm, and a separate near-infrared camera. So the Chinese win on pixel count.The Chinese have a 1.1 square degree field of view versus a 0.28 square degree field of view for the Roman. The pixel scale appears to be 76 milliarcseconds versus 110 milliarcseconds on the Roman.

They also have four more instruments.

"Other four instruments mounted on the CSST are designed to observe individual objects or small fields, like mapping star-forming regions of the Milky Way, obtaining instantaneous color of fast varying objects such as comets and spinning asteroids, studying the co-evolution of supermassive black holes and galaxies and star formation in the nearby part of the universe, and direct imaging of exoplanets in the visible."

I interpret that as meaning that they have a coronagraph, a medium resolution spectrometer and a few other things.

The most interesting part of this project is the partnership with their manned program. Although it will normally operate as a free flyer, the telescope can dock with their space station for maintenance and upgrades. This allows China to evolve the capabilities of their space telescope over time by replacing the instruments. It will be very interesting to see how well that works.

The bottom line is that this is an extremely capable machine on paper. It remains to be seen how good the execution will be. I can't think of any other Chinese space telescopes and this seems over ambitious for a first project. It must be very expensive. If it works it will be very capable at finding optical counterparts to gamma ray bursts and gravity wave events. It will also be good at searching for planet nine. If the Chinese find it, they get to name it.

The Chinese space science program is well funded, has some original ideas, and seems to be aiming for parity with the US. I don't think many Americans realize that.

Offline luhai167

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Re: Xuntian Space Telescope - CZ-5B - WSLC - 2023
« Reply #14 on: 06/29/2022 03:33 pm »


I can't think of any other Chinese space telescopes and this seems over ambitious for a first project.

From my immediate memory I could think of Huiyan (aka HXMT) space telescope in the X-ray range. I believe it was launched in the late 2010s, there might a couple more that's escaping my mind. This is not including various telescopes looking down at earth, I believe even Huiyan itself was a modified reconnaissance satellite.

Offline XRZ.YZ

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Re: Xuntian Space Telescope - CZ-5B - WSLC - 2023
« Reply #15 on: 07/13/2022 06:09 pm »
Removing my earlier post since I found I got something wrong.


Still posting some old PPT on telescope design

https://www.issibern.ch/teams/weakgravlense/wp-content/uploads/2019/11/H.-Zhan.pdf
XQCR LLYZ GYZH HZSZ

Offline XRZ.YZ

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XQCR LLYZ GYZH HZSZ

Offline whitelancer64

Re: Xuntian Space Telescope - CZ-5B - WSLC - 2023
« Reply #17 on: 07/13/2022 07:09 pm »
This is a very interesting, very capable and possibly overambitious project.

The telescope has a 2m mirror, and appears to cover the uv-visible wavelength band. The sensors are quoted as being 81 megapixels (9000*9000 if square), which is larger than anything I have read about in US or European projects. It has a 2.5 gigapixel camera, and a field of view 300-350 times larger than Hubble.

For comparison, the Roman space telescope 300 megapixel camera covering the visible to near-infrared (0.48-2.3 micron) band. Euclid has a 600 megapixel camera covering 550-920 nm, and a separate near-infrared camera. So the Chinese win on pixel count.The Chinese have a 1.1 square degree field of view versus a 0.28 square degree field of view for the Roman. The pixel scale appears to be 76 milliarcseconds versus 110 milliarcseconds on the Roman.

They also have four more instruments.

"Other four instruments mounted on the CSST are designed to observe individual objects or small fields, like mapping star-forming regions of the Milky Way, obtaining instantaneous color of fast varying objects such as comets and spinning asteroids, studying the co-evolution of supermassive black holes and galaxies and star formation in the nearby part of the universe, and direct imaging of exoplanets in the visible."

I interpret that as meaning that they have a coronagraph, a medium resolution spectrometer and a few other things.

The most interesting part of this project is the partnership with their manned program. Although it will normally operate as a free flyer, the telescope can dock with their space station for maintenance and upgrades. This allows China to evolve the capabilities of their space telescope over time by replacing the instruments. It will be very interesting to see how well that works.

The bottom line is that this is an extremely capable machine on paper. It remains to be seen how good the execution will be. I can't think of any other Chinese space telescopes and this seems over ambitious for a first project. It must be very expensive. If it works it will be very capable at finding optical counterparts to gamma ray bursts and gravity wave events. It will also be good at searching for planet nine. If the Chinese find it, they get to name it.

The Chinese space science program is well funded, has some original ideas, and seems to be aiming for parity with the US. I don't think many Americans realize that.

The Chinese Gaofen-11 spy satellite series has an aperture of at least 1.5 meters, so it's not like China has zero experience with large optical satellites.
"One bit of advice: it is important to view knowledge as sort of a semantic tree -- make sure you understand the fundamental principles, ie the trunk and big branches, before you get into the leaves/details or there is nothing for them to hang on to." - Elon Musk
"There are lies, damned lies, and launch schedules." - Larry J

Offline Star One

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Re: Xuntian Space Telescope - CZ-5B - WSLC - 2023
« Reply #18 on: 07/18/2022 04:41 pm »
The Xuntian space telescope is in the prototype phase:


Offline ttle2

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Re: Xuntian Space Telescope - CZ-5B - WSLC - 2023
« Reply #19 on: 07/18/2022 08:12 pm »
This is a very interesting, very capable and possibly overambitious project.

The telescope has a 2m mirror, and appears to cover the uv-visible wavelength band. The sensors are quoted as being 81 megapixels (9000*9000 if square), which is larger than anything I have read about in US or European projects. It has a 2.5 gigapixel camera, and a field of view 300-350 times larger than Hubble.

The project does indeed sound very ambitious. The camera is huge and data downlink requirements must be enormous. LEO instead of L2 helps there of course, but there are good reasons why (large) western space observatories are now almost all sent to L2.

Curiously, one of the presentations seems to mention that the CCDs are manufactured by e2v (Teledyne). I would have thought that exporting such technology to China would be very hard.

 

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