Author Topic: Vast, a Startup for "human habitation, first in LEO, and then beyond"  (Read 75018 times)

https://www.vastspace.com/updates/vast-welcomes-veteran-nasa-astronaut-garrett-reisman-as-human-spaceflight-advisor

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Long Beach, Calif. (July 11, 2023) – Vast, a pioneer in space habitation technologies, is pleased to announce the appointment of Garrett Reisman, a veteran NASA astronaut and accomplished space industry expert, as its newest advisor. With an impressive background in space exploration and extensive industry experience, Reisman brings invaluable expertise and strategic human spaceflight insights to Vast.

Following his departure from NASA in early 2011, Reisman joined SpaceX where he served in multiple capacities, most recently as the Director of Space Operations. In May 2018, he stepped down from his full-time position at SpaceX to become a Professor of Astronautical Engineering in the Viterbi School of Engineering at the University of Southern California. He continues to support SpaceX as a Senior Advisor.

Seems Vast and Reisman got in contact because of both party's ties with SpaceX.

Space News article as well: https://spacenews.com/former-nasa-astronaut-to-advise-vast-on-commercial-space-station-efforts/

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In an interview, Reisman said a former SpaceX colleague, now working at Vast, reached out to him with a technical question. That led to discussions with Vast executives about assisting the company. “I got excited by what I saw, which was a really interesting company doing some really cool work,” he said.

Offline yg1968

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https://twitter.com/vast/status/1669450330311114752

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We are honored to have been selected by @NASA for the second Collaborations for Commercial Space Capabilities (CCSC-2) initiative. We will be partnering with NASA on key technologies & operations for our microgravity and artificial gravity space stations.

https://www.nasa.gov/press-release/seven-us-companies-collaborate-with-nasa-to-advance-space-capabilities

Source Selection Statement has come out:
https://www.nasa.gov/jsc/procurement/ccsc2

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Great model that shows the scale of Haven-1

twitter.com/ryannagata/status/1678880949545873408

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Just finished this 1/20 scale model of @vast Haven 1 docked with @SpaceX crew Dragon. I don’t get to build models very much anymore so this was fun. Thank you @maxhaot for asking me to do this!

https://twitter.com/maxhaot/status/1678903562347380736

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Thank you for agreeing and for the incredible work Ryan.
« Last Edit: 07/12/2023 06:56 am by FutureSpaceTourist »

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https://twitter.com/vast/status/1679530389788844036

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In 2025, this hatch will open the commercial space station era.

(Photo: Haven-1 Development Prototype)

Offline Steven Pietrobon

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Image of the model.
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Offline Twark_Main

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IMO we should think of Haven 1 as being like Falcon 1. It's a sub-scale demonstrator and learning testbed that proves out the building blocks at the lowest-cost, "minimum viable" scale (1 engine, 1 station module).

I can't wait to see their "Falcon 9."  :D


    - Stage 1: Build a crew-rated, single module station. That's hard enough! Glad to see VAST isn't initially biting off more. First demo spin, maybe.

    - Stage 2: Build large opening hatch and inter-module coupler. Ramp up module manufacturing. First operational spin. This is the "stick."

    - Stage 3: Third-generation modules, now highly optimized. Large-scale ring and/or barbell stations. Predicting design features this far out is probably foolhardy, like trying to predict Starship details before the first Falcon 1 flight.  ;)
« Last Edit: 08/03/2023 12:49 am by Twark_Main »
"The search for a universal design which suits all sites, people, and situations is obviously impossible. What is possible is well designed examples of the application of universal principles." ~~ David Holmgren

https://www.vastspace.com/updates/vast-appoints-max-haot-as-its-new-ceo-and-alex-hudson-as-its-first-cto [Aug 11]

Vast has scooped up an ex-SpaceXer who preciously worked on avionics as CTO

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Vast, a pioneer in space habitation technologies, is pleased to announce that Jed McCaleb, Vast’s Founder, has appointed Max Haot (currently President) to succeed him in the role of Chief Executive Officer. McCaleb will move into the role of Founder, Board Chair & Tech Fellow. Also announced today, Alex Hudson will join the company as its first Chief Technology Officer.

‍“My excitement and financial commitment to Vast continues to grow. With our recent operational acceleration and growth, the time has come for me to take a more strategic role as Founder, Board Chair & Tech Fellow and to empower our leadership to lead the day-to-day operation at Vast. I’m excited to appoint Max Haot as our new CEO to succeed me in this role and Alex Hudson as our first CTO,” said McCaleb.

“Building our leadership team with a focus on proven crewed space flight experience and safety is a key priority at Vast. To this effect, I’m excited to welcome and partner with Alex in the newly created role of Chief Technology Officer at Vast,” said Haot, Vast’s CEO.

Alex comes with a broad array of experience across a number of hard-tech fields, including space vehicles, quantum computing, imaging systems and scientific instruments. Alex earned his undergraduate degree in Physics from the University of Bristol and his Ph.D. in MRI Physics, from the lab of Nobel Laureate Sir Peter Mansfield at the University of Nottingham in the U.K.

Most recently, Alex led the Avionics and Dragon Avionics teams at SpaceX. The highlight of Alex’s career was flying astronauts on the new Crew Dragon spaceship during Demo-2, which positioned SpaceX to commence regular transport of astronauts once more on American hardware, launched from the USA. Significant missions of his Avionics team included the sub-orbital Starship SN8 (“belly flop” landing maneuver), SN15 (first Starship landing), and most recently the Starship Orbital test flight 1 (the first flight of the 33-engine super-heavy booster and ship).

“I look forward to this next exciting challenge – developing an artificial gravity space station with the team at Vast to enable long-term life in space,” said Hudson, CTO at Vast.
« Last Edit: 08/11/2023 06:14 pm by spacenuance »

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https://twitter.com/vast/status/1716579262730551560

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This is the Haven-1 prototype hatch integrated into a pressure test fixture. Astronauts will see a similar view when they first open the SpaceX Crew Dragon hatch to enter Haven-1.

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Odd. No pressure indicator, nor pressure equalisation valve.

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Odd. No pressure indicator, nor pressure equalisation valve.
im sure that would be near the (much less photogenic) plumbing side of this.
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Odd. No pressure indicator, nor pressure equalisation valve.
It is a prototype. ::)

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https://twitter.com/vast/status/1720498714907935208

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Haven-1 will fly with control moment gyroscopes (CMG) for attitude control. Each Vast-designed CMG consists of a fast-spinning flywheel mounted on an articulated gimbal. Rotating the gimbal produces a gyroscopic torque by changing the direction of the angular momentum stored in the flywheel. The Haven-1 CMGs have 150 Nms momentum capacity.

Offline Twark_Main

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https://twitter.com/vast/status/1720498714907935208

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Haven-1 will fly with control moment gyroscopes (CMG) for attitude control. Each Vast-designed CMG consists of a fast-spinning flywheel mounted on an articulated gimbal. Rotating the gimbal produces a gyroscopic torque by changing the direction of the angular momentum stored in the flywheel. The Haven-1 CMGs have 150 Nms momentum capacity.

Good to see some modern CMG work.

Note that these are much smaller than the ISS CMGs, which have a capacity of 4 × 4760 Nms.

« Last Edit: 11/04/2023 12:02 am by Twark_Main »
"The search for a universal design which suits all sites, people, and situations is obviously impossible. What is possible is well designed examples of the application of universal principles." ~~ David Holmgren

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https://twitter.com/vast/status/1720498714907935208

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Haven-1 will fly with control moment gyroscopes (CMG) for attitude control. Each Vast-designed CMG consists of a fast-spinning flywheel mounted on an articulated gimbal. Rotating the gimbal produces a gyroscopic torque by changing the direction of the angular momentum stored in the flywheel. The Haven-1 CMGs have 150 Nms momentum capacity.

Good to see some modern CMG work.

Note that these are much smaller than the ISS CMGs, which have a capacity of 4 × 4760 Nms.

Weren't the ISS CMG's also partially intended as power storage?

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Lunar AG demo!

Offline Twark_Main

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https://twitter.com/vast/status/1720498714907935208

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Haven-1 will fly with control moment gyroscopes (CMG) for attitude control. Each Vast-designed CMG consists of a fast-spinning flywheel mounted on an articulated gimbal. Rotating the gimbal produces a gyroscopic torque by changing the direction of the angular momentum stored in the flywheel. The Haven-1 CMGs have 150 Nms momentum capacity.

Good to see some modern CMG work.

Note that these are much smaller than the ISS CMGs, which have a capacity of 4 × 4760 Nms.

Weren't the ISS CMG's also partially intended as power storage?

You're thinking reaction control wheels, not CMGs.

RCWs spin a flywheel up and down, so they might be used for electricity storage. CMGs rotate their flywheel at a constant speed and instead change the axis pointing angle.
"The search for a universal design which suits all sites, people, and situations is obviously impossible. What is possible is well designed examples of the application of universal principles." ~~ David Holmgren

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https://twitter.com/vast/status/1720498714907935208

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Haven-1 will fly with control moment gyroscopes (CMG) for attitude control. Each Vast-designed CMG consists of a fast-spinning flywheel mounted on an articulated gimbal. Rotating the gimbal produces a gyroscopic torque by changing the direction of the angular momentum stored in the flywheel. The Haven-1 CMGs have 150 Nms momentum capacity.

Good to see some modern CMG work.

Note that these are much smaller than the ISS CMGs, which have a capacity of 4 × 4760 Nms.

Weren't the ISS CMG's also partially intended as power storage?

You're thinking reaction control wheels, not CMGs.

RCWs spin a flywheel up and down, so they might be used for electricity storage. CMGs rotate their flywheel at a constant speed and instead change the axis pointing angle.
No, he's right. You can use CMGs for energy storage as you can spin them up and down (to store and extract energy) without applying torque. Reaction Wheels apply torque when spun up or down, so you could not use them for energy storage without spinning the station about.

Offline Twark_Main

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https://twitter.com/vast/status/1720498714907935208

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Haven-1 will fly with control moment gyroscopes (CMG) for attitude control. Each Vast-designed CMG consists of a fast-spinning flywheel mounted on an articulated gimbal. Rotating the gimbal produces a gyroscopic torque by changing the direction of the angular momentum stored in the flywheel. The Haven-1 CMGs have 150 Nms momentum capacity.

Good to see some modern CMG work.

Note that these are much smaller than the ISS CMGs, which have a capacity of 4 × 4760 Nms.

Weren't the ISS CMG's also partially intended as power storage?

You're thinking reaction control wheels, not CMGs.

RCWs spin a flywheel up and down, so they might be used for electricity storage. CMGs rotate their flywheel at a constant speed and instead change the axis pointing angle.
No, he's right. You can use CMGs for energy storage as you can spin them up and down (to store and extract energy) without applying torque. Reaction Wheels apply torque when spun up or down, so you could not use them for energy storage without spinning the station about.


Thanks, found the paper.  Note that nothing indicates the ISS CMGs actually support this.

https://ntrs.nasa.gov/api/citations/19990025459/downloads/19990025459.pdf

https://ntrs.nasa.gov/api/citations/20040086750/downloads/20040086750.pdf


As usual it's a tradeoff, in this case between Battery SoC and gyroscopic control. If you "discharge" your system to 50% energy, it only has 50% as much control authority!   :o

Seems better to right-size your CMG from the start, and simply up-size the conventional battery system if needed.

It's a cool "Apollo 13" emergency mode though...

« Last Edit: 11/26/2023 01:30 pm by Twark_Main »
"The search for a universal design which suits all sites, people, and situations is obviously impossible. What is possible is well designed examples of the application of universal principles." ~~ David Holmgren

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