Author Topic: Perigee Aerospace  (Read 20078 times)

Offline Mahurora

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Re: Perigee Aerospace
« Reply #20 on: 11/03/2021 11:38 pm »
https://www.joongang.co.kr/article/24095584#home

Several news from July.

Perigee is cooperating deeply with KAIST and is using their combustion testing facilities since last year.

First launch of test vehicle by the end of this year, within Korea as opposed to what was known before(launching from Southern Launch's WWOLC in South Australia). 3 test launches planned before entering service.

36 employees, majority from KAIST and some from KAI. KARI and KAIST engineers regarding rocket engines are on advisory role.



fotos of the facility and the engine test.
« Last Edit: 11/04/2021 12:26 am by Mahurora »

Offline Yiosie

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Re: Perigee Aerospace
« Reply #21 on: 11/04/2021 08:18 pm »
New Science Observation Rocket Set to be Tested on Jeju by Year’s End [dated Oct. 27]

Quote
Following the launch of South Korea’s first homegrown space rocket Nuri, another challenge for space will be made on Jeju Island.

Jeju’s provincial government said Tuesday that the Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST) will test the launch of a science observation rocket in Hangyeong-myeon township on the island to commemorate its 50th anniversary by the end of this year.

The test is aimed at tracing the trajectory flight of a small liquid-propelled rocket with a length of 3 meters and a diameter of 20 centimeters.

Hankyeong-myeon is an ideal site for rocket launches since it is located outside the airspace of private airports and military bases.

This is confirmed to be Perigee's suborbital test rocket:

‘누리호’만 있나? 제주서 연내 민간 우주로켓 1호 쏜다 (Is there only 'Nuri-ho'? Jeju to launch civilian space rocket 1 within this year) [dated Oct. 24]

Google translate (bolds mine):

Quote
As the Korean launch vehicle Nuri (KSLV-II), made with pure domestic technology, achieved 'half success', while foreign media are paying attention to our rapid development of space science and technology, the Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), together with Perigee Aerospace (hereinafter referred to as Perigee), a rocket-making startup created by undergraduate students, is planning to launch a rocket from Jeju in December to mark the 50th anniversary of the school's opening this year.

<snip>

Dowa and KAIST selected Yongsu-ri, Hangyeong-myeon, Jeju-si as the launch site, and completed discussions with residents.

Researchers from the Department of Aerospace Engineering at KAIST are stationed in Yongsu-ri Village to prepare for launch. The final launch test is expected in early December.

Perigee is a start-up company that aims to develop an ultra-small space launch vehicle. CEO Shin Dong-yoon is a 24-year-old fourth-year undergraduate, but he has already been in business for 6 years.

This launch is an experiment in ballistic flight of a small liquid-propelled rocket 3m in length and 20cm in diameter. Ultimately, the first liquid methane-based test projectile will be launched into space at an altitude of 100 km or higher.

Offline Steven Pietrobon

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Re: Perigee Aerospace
« Reply #22 on: 11/05/2021 05:03 am »
Here's some images of the sounding rocket.
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Offline CameronD

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Re: Perigee Aerospace
« Reply #23 on: 01/09/2022 10:33 pm »
Posted by Yoon Shin on LinkedIn:
Quote
2021.12.29.  Blue Whale 0.1 launch @ Jeju Island
Perigee Aerospace Inc.

Rocket failed to follow an intented flight trajectory due to strong wind, and an on-board AFTS terminated the flight.

It was an unsuccessful attempt but the team was able to test important hardware to be used on our upcoming orbital launch vehicle (engine, cryo valves, flight computer, telemetry, ground software… etc.)

Whilst they may not have reached the altitude they were targeting, successfully leaving the launch tower on the first try marks really good progress!
« Last Edit: 01/09/2022 10:39 pm by CameronD »
With sufficient thrust, pigs fly just fine - however, this is not necessarily a good idea. It is hard to be sure where they are
going to land, and it could be dangerous sitting under them as they fly overhead.

Offline Yiosie

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Re: Perigee Aerospace
« Reply #24 on: 01/09/2022 11:17 pm »
More information on the Blue Whale 0.1 launch:

Sudden gust of winds foils launch of sounding rocket built by rocket start-up [dated Dec. 29, 2021]

Quote
In a remote coastal area on the southern resort island of Jeju on December 29, Perigee Aerospace launched a test rocket with a length of 3.2 meters, a diameter of 19 centimeters, and a weight of 51 kilograms, using ethanol and liquid oxygen as fuel. It was aimed at building experience and checking the combustion of a liquid propulsion engine and the performance of pre-set flight and trajectory, communication, and navigation devices.

After flying for several seconds, the suborbital rocket called "Blue Whale 0.1" came down drawing a trajectory like a shell and fell into the sea with its parachute open. After the rocket was recovered by a civilian fishing boat, Perigee Aerospace CEO Shin Dong-yoon admitted failure, saying the rocket lost its track due to a gust of wind that activated the rocket's automatic flight suspension system.

"At the moment the rocket took off, there was a much stronger gust than expected," Shin told reporters. "The wind sent it flying off course and the automatic flight suspension system stopped its engine." However, Shin was not totally disappointed, saying the failed launch conducted in collaboration with the Korea Advanced Institute of Science & Technology (KAIST provided a good experience.

Offline Kryten

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Re: Perigee Aerospace
« Reply #25 on: 01/10/2022 04:27 pm »
 It superficially looks a lot like Interstellar Technology's Momo.

Offline CameronD

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Re: Perigee Aerospace
« Reply #26 on: 02/11/2022 03:58 am »
From LinkedIn:
Quote
Perigee LOX-LNG upper stage engine prototypes being test fired at rocket development facility in Daejeon, Republic of Korea.

Here, two different test configurations are shown:
First one is a copper calorimeteric chamber to characterize injector and propellant supply performance.
The second one is a flight-like ablative chamber to characterize long duration performance and temperature variations.

Note the plume shapes are different between the two, as the ablative version has a larger nozzle exit angle to connect a nozzle extension.
« Last Edit: 02/11/2022 03:59 am by CameronD »
With sufficient thrust, pigs fly just fine - however, this is not necessarily a good idea. It is hard to be sure where they are
going to land, and it could be dangerous sitting under them as they fly overhead.

Offline CameronD

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Re: Perigee Aerospace
« Reply #27 on: 03/03/2022 12:23 am »
Sparks fly!  From LinkedIn:
Quote
With static fire completed, we're now preparing for the 3rd and the last flight of the BW-0.1.
Quote
Additionally, this BW0.1v3 vehicle is run by an upgraded flight software with an improved aerodynamic model.
« Last Edit: 03/03/2022 12:24 am by CameronD »
With sufficient thrust, pigs fly just fine - however, this is not necessarily a good idea. It is hard to be sure where they are
going to land, and it could be dangerous sitting under them as they fly overhead.

Offline Fmedici

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Re: Perigee Aerospace
« Reply #28 on: 03/03/2022 07:08 am »
I counted only one launch so far, when was the second?

Offline Bean Kenobi

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Re: Perigee Aerospace
« Reply #29 on: 03/03/2022 08:28 pm »
I counted only one launch so far, when was the second?

Their Facebook page (https://www.facebook.com/perigeespace) says Dec. 29th, 2021 was their second launch, not the first one.

Quote
Second flight of the Blue Whale 0.1 🚀
— December 29, 2021.
Rocket failed to follow an intented flight trajectory due to strong wind, and an on-board AFTS terminated the flight.
It was an unsuccessful attempt, but the team was able to test some important hardware for our next test vehicle.

Their Youtube page says their first launch was on Dec. 5th, 2021.



Quote
First flight of the sounding rocket — Dec. 05, 2021.
Jeju launch center, Jeju, Korea
« Last Edit: 03/03/2022 08:34 pm by Bean Kenobi »

Offline CameronD

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Re: Perigee Aerospace
« Reply #30 on: 04/07/2022 02:12 am »
With sufficient thrust, pigs fly just fine - however, this is not necessarily a good idea. It is hard to be sure where they are
going to land, and it could be dangerous sitting under them as they fly overhead.

Offline Steven Pietrobon

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Re: Perigee Aerospace
« Reply #31 on: 04/16/2022 07:06 am »
Third flight was launched on 24 March. The video says the first launch was on 9 December 2021.

« Last Edit: 04/16/2022 07:09 am by Steven Pietrobon »
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Offline CameronD

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Re: Perigee Aerospace
« Reply #32 on: 05/27/2022 07:28 am »
Recently on LinkedIn:

Quote
The perfect propellant tank doesn't exi-

Perigee structure team is testing the propellant tank for the BW-1 upper stage at cryogenic temperature and a maximum expected operating pressure (MEOP).

The upper stage engine is pressure-fed for a simple and robust design. So, the tanks should supply propellants to the engine inlets at about 20 bar (290 psi).

Normally, this kind of high pressure can only be dealt with by a thick-walled pressure vessel. Not to mention they are soooooooooo heavy for launch vehicles.

To reduce the mass, the BW-1 propellant tanks are made of carbon fiber composites. And as the result, the upper stage propellant tank weighs just 20 kg.

There are, however, some technical problems when using CFRP for rocket fuel tanks.

Firstly, the cryogenic temperature of rocket propellants makes most materials brittle and easy to break at a relatively weak shock and vibration. Therefore, it is essential to keep the resin system somewhat “ductile” even at cryogenic temperature.

Secondly, the CFRP (Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastic) sounds cool but is literally a plastic and even a small shock can trigger fierce combustion in an oxygen-rich environment. To prevent the propellant tanks from becoming a hybrid rocket grain during the flight, special additives were added to increase the activation energy of the wall matrix.

Lastly, joining metallic parts was extremely difficult due to CTE difference between CFRP and metals. A special bonding agent that remains elastic over a wide range of temperature (and should also be LOX-compatible) was developed to attach upper and lower bosses, a common dome, and a LOX transfer tube submerged inside the LNG tank.
With sufficient thrust, pigs fly just fine - however, this is not necessarily a good idea. It is hard to be sure where they are
going to land, and it could be dangerous sitting under them as they fly overhead.

Offline Senex

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Re: Perigee Aerospace
« Reply #33 on: 05/28/2022 03:06 pm »
I very much appreciate the video showing the "failures" along the way.  I find the "arc of progress" at least as exciting as the successes!  Congratulations for having the confidence to show a glimpse behind the curtain!

Offline Mahurora

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Re: Perigee Aerospace
« Reply #34 on: 06/06/2023 09:34 pm »
Hey, another set of updates regarding Perigee. They're now a much proper business with normal accountance and management team as well as investor relations and have expanded to more than 50 staffs of late.

Talking about their SLV development, the Blue Whale 1, seems like its performance goals were greatly revised... guess forum members who were casting doubts about their numbers were indeed right afterall ;)

The earlier Blue Whale 1 performance figures used to be 50kg to 500km SSO with ca. 1.8t of takeoff mass, the takeoff mass being way too small for intended payload mass. They were aiming for the market for the world's smallest and cheapest launcher, but there probably was and now is even less business case for such a niche launcher, considering current launch service market as well as general satellite market trend. Also there's enough competition in this weight class as well lately. Most importantly Innospace's first SLV is supposed to be in this exact payload class so they might want to avoid domestic competition as well.

So now the new BW1 has grown way larger into a 20t SLV able to launch 170kg to 500km SSO, while being able to be reused pad-to-pad ala Falcon 9. Now the question is if they will be able to offer their launch service as cost competitive compared to the likes of Electron and others LVs in the class. They're in the dilemma that their proposed launcher is way more realistic but the cost competitiveness even less certain. They are aiming for $ 3 million launch cost figure, a $ 1 million increase from their initial figures but still around half that of Electron's cheapest offer. Personally, I'm very doubtful if that would be possible even with successful demonstration and application of reusability. The proposed revised-BW1 is already few hundread kilograms heavier dry and significantly heavier in terms of launch mass since it is going to land on its own. I'd say they've got a very tough job to make it cheaper than Rocket Lab's mid-air delivery ignoring other factos in favor of Rocket Lab.

Maybe there's a business case specifically in emerging Asian market since there's a chance that lower launch cost could be possible considering the logistics of satellite transportation to the US or NZ compared to launching them from Korea. Regional competition only comes from Japan's Interstellar Technologies and from Chinese private launchers. The former seems to be at around the same ballpark or a bit ahead in terms of their main engine development progress, whereas with the latter there's a growing geopolitical concerns going forward. Also, Chinese private launchers will have capacity problems considering there's going to be enough domestic demands.

Also, apart from Jeju they've contracted with Esrange Space Center in Sweden as their second launch port. I wonder what went wrong between them and Southern Launch in Whalers Way. I'd guess Southern Launch teaming up with TiSpace to establish ATSpace has to do something with it; they were the first intended customer of Southern Launch afterall. Performance difference betweeen the possible launch from Jeju and Esrange are as below.

For the revised BW1, the new schedules state a test campaign starting from next year and a commercial flight from 2025. We'll see if they'll be able to keep their words.
« Last Edit: 06/07/2023 08:38 pm by Mahurora »

Offline Mahurora

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Re: Perigee Aerospace
« Reply #35 on: 06/06/2023 09:36 pm »
The new BW1 looks like a mini Falcon 9

Offline Mahurora

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Re: Perigee Aerospace
« Reply #36 on: 06/06/2023 09:46 pm »
https://www.facebook.com/reel/474801641282189

BW-0.3 hover test. Will be followed by the development of upper stage named BW-0.4 and first stage named BW-0.6.

Offline Mahurora

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Re: Perigee Aerospace
« Reply #37 on: 06/06/2023 09:49 pm »
They're also building a sea-launch platform called Cetacea 1. From their launch simulations, it seems like they want to go further south into the East China Sea so that they could fly their LV between Miyakojima and Okinawa and avoid further maneuvering.

Online trimeta

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Re: Perigee Aerospace
« Reply #38 on: 06/06/2023 09:58 pm »
Their numbers in the table seem to be a bit confused, I don't understand how the rocket could carry 170kg to SSO but only 150kg to unspecified "LEO." Since elsewhere on the site it's said that the rocket carries 150kg to LEO, I'm going to assume the numbers were just swapped in the table and it should be 170kg to "LEO."

Also, while IANARS and I sometimes have gotten in trouble for looking too closely at numbers, I don't understand how the upper-stage engine has just 4.3kN of thrust. For comparison, Electron's vacuum Rutherford has 25.8kN, six times as much. Sure, that's the uprated Electron which carries 33% more payload to SSO, but unless the first stage is doing significantly more of the work, I don't see how the second stage gets the job done.

And if the first stage is doing significantly more of the work...then that's an interesting design decision and I'd be curious what the community thinks about it.

Offline Mahurora

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Re: Perigee Aerospace
« Reply #39 on: 06/06/2023 10:38 pm »
Their numbers in the table seem to be a bit confused, I don't understand how the rocket could carry 170kg to SSO but only 150kg to unspecified "LEO." Since elsewhere on the site it's said that the rocket carries 150kg to LEO, I'm going to assume the numbers were just swapped in the table and it should be 170kg to "LEO."

Also, while IANARS and I sometimes have gotten in trouble for looking too closely at numbers, I don't understand how the upper-stage engine has just 4.3kN of thrust. For comparison, Electron's vacuum Rutherford has 25.8kN, six times as much. Sure, that's the uprated Electron which carries 33% more payload to SSO, but unless the first stage is doing significantly more of the work, I don't see how the second stage gets the job done.

And if the first stage is doing significantly more of the work...then that's an interesting design decision and I'd be curious what the community thinks about it.
Yeah, I think they (and as a result I) made a mistake on that part.

Talking about 2nd stage thrust, maybe it's a design choice primarily due to cost reasons. Only the first stage is reusable afterall and their second stage is pressure fed. The first stage of BW-1.0 is meant to be more powerful than updated Electron by quite a margin as well. Though, equipped with Blue 1S with less ISP, I'm not sure how that exactly would be possible as well. There's a chance that the second stage dry mass will be lighter but I don't think that the mass difference between Rutherford vacuum and Skyblue will be that great for instance. We'll see if they'll change their LV specification figures
« Last Edit: 06/06/2023 10:48 pm by Mahurora »

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