Author Topic: Gilmour Space Technologies  (Read 120072 times)

Offline Steven Pietrobon

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Re: Gilmour Space Technologies
« Reply #20 on: 10/01/2017 09:13 am »
From the IAC, the first Ariel suborbital launch is currently scheduled for March 2018. They are skipping the intermediate size rocket they had previously planned. Altitude will be less than 100 km to avoid the $750M insurance requirement!
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Online ringsider

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Re: Gilmour Space Technologies
« Reply #21 on: 10/01/2017 12:59 pm »
This is disingenuous. The current law says AU$750m OR the Maximum Probable Loss, whichever is lower.

Gilmour knows this, because they have read the act and objected to it specifically in their very recent submissions:-

https://industry.gov.au/industry/IndustrySectors/space/Documents/Legislative-Proposals-Paper.pdf

https://industry.gov.au/industry/IndustrySectors/space/Documents/Gilmour-Space-Technologies.pdf

https://industry.gov.au/industry/IndustrySectors/space/Pages/Submissions.aspx

Offline josespeck

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Re: Gilmour Space Technologies
« Reply #22 on: 10/03/2017 05:24 pm »
This is disingenuous. The current law says AU$750m OR the Maximum Probable Loss, whichever is lower.

Gilmour knows this, because they have read the act and objected to it specifically in their very recent submissions:-

https://industry.gov.au/industry/IndustrySectors/space/Documents/Legislative-Proposals-Paper.pdf

https://industry.gov.au/industry/IndustrySectors/space/Documents/Gilmour-Space-Technologies.pdf

https://industry.gov.au/industry/IndustrySectors/space/Pages/Submissions.aspx


How much can insurance cover?.
They say that the cost is cheaper than in the United States.

Offline Steven Pietrobon

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Re: Gilmour Space Technologies
« Reply #23 on: 10/07/2017 03:58 am »
This is disingenuous. The current law says AU$750m OR the Maximum Probable Loss, whichever is lower.

The problem is calculating the MPL value.

https://ablis.business.gov.au/service/ag/maximum-probable-loss-methodology/31339

You have to include the cost of all events that can occur with a probability of 1 in 10 million or greater. That number could easily exceed $750M.
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Offline Katana

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Re: Gilmour Space Technologies
« Reply #24 on: 10/07/2017 05:18 am »
This is disingenuous. The current law says AU$750m OR the Maximum Probable Loss, whichever is lower.

The problem is calculating the MPL value.

https://ablis.business.gov.au/service/ag/maximum-probable-loss-methodology/31339

You have to include the cost of all events that can occur with a probability of 1 in 10 million or greater. That number could easily exceed $750M.
If you launch from middle of a big desert, with max range (less than 200km for 100km height) still inside the desert, nothing valuable could be hit.

Life insurance of team may be the biggest risk, but not yet reaching $750M.

Gilmour is more responsive than Vector and ARCA, which made amateurish mistakes on range.
« Last Edit: 10/07/2017 05:33 am by Katana »

Online ringsider

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Re: Gilmour Space Technologies
« Reply #25 on: 10/07/2017 07:54 am »
This is disingenuous. The current law says AU$750m OR the Maximum Probable Loss, whichever is lower.

The problem is calculating the MPL value.

https://ablis.business.gov.au/service/ag/maximum-probable-loss-methodology/31339

You have to include the cost of all events that can occur with a probability of 1 in 10 million or greater. That number could easily exceed $750M.

Yeah but they are not planning to launching from downtown Sydney. It is a risk assessment based on rocket range and the nearby environment using Ec (Expected casualty) rates. And the calculation is like this:

--

The applicant will use whichever value is higher:

1.That obtained by multiplying the per capita Gross Domestic Product (GDP) of the country where casualties may result by the number of casualties estimated; or

2. If there is a particular high-valued third-party asset individually facing an impact probability of 10-7 or greater, make an accurate evaluation of the loss-of-use value.

A monetary value of 5,000,000 A$ is attributed to each casualty.

Example Calculation of Method 1

Casualties: calculated by MPL process = 3
Loss of life value: 3 x 5,000,000 A$ = 15,000,000 A$
Loss of property:  50% loss of life = 7,500,000 A$
Per capita GDP per year = 40,000 A$
Time out of use = 1 year
Loss of use 3 x 40,000 A$ = 120,000 A$
Clean-up costs = 100,000 A$
Property, loss of use and clean-up MPL value = 7,760,000 A$
Total MPL value = 22,700,000 A$

That is more like what they have to cover if they launch in a less popualted area and the premium on that would be about $10K.

P13 of your reference show the relative value of farmland (AU$117,000) versus factory land (AU$3.5M).

So all that drama about AU$750M is largely not really understanding what they required to do, which is pretty typical in this sector.

Offline CameronD

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Re: Gilmour Space Technologies
« Reply #26 on: 10/08/2017 10:58 pm »
This is disingenuous. The current law says AU$750m OR the Maximum Probable Loss, whichever is lower.

The first paragraph of the link Steven posted above clearly states:  "You are required to be insured for an amount not less than $750 million and the amount of the maximum probable loss that may be incurred in respect of damage to third parties caused by the launch or return, as calculated in accordance with this code." {emphasis mine}

Which "current law" are you referring to??


I find this passing comment in the MPL document interesting:  "Thus, whether launching from Woomera, Christmas Island, Gladstone or elsewhere.."  Apparently Gladstone is an option the Space Coordination Office is well aware of.  :)
« Last Edit: 10/08/2017 11:00 pm by CameronD »
With sufficient thrust, pigs fly just fine - however, this is not necessarily a good idea. It is hard to be sure where they are
going to land, and it could be dangerous sitting under them as they fly overhead.

Offline CameronD

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Re: Gilmour Space Technologies
« Reply #27 on: 10/08/2017 11:16 pm »
I had no idea you could gain approval for a space launch from Australian soil right now! - either directly or via an Exemption.  As easy as 1, 2,3:

1. https://ablis.business.gov.au/service/ag/space-licence/11?modal=true

2. https://ablis.business.gov.au/service/ag/launch-permit/12?modal=true

3. https://ablis.business.gov.au/service/ag/application-for-an-exemption-certificate-for-specified-space-activities/265?modal=true

It's not a cheap hobby though.. for a corporation you'd lose nearly half-a-million bucks in "government fees and charges".  :(

« Last Edit: 10/08/2017 11:19 pm by CameronD »
With sufficient thrust, pigs fly just fine - however, this is not necessarily a good idea. It is hard to be sure where they are
going to land, and it could be dangerous sitting under them as they fly overhead.

Offline Steven Pietrobon

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Re: Gilmour Space Technologies
« Reply #28 on: 10/11/2017 08:54 am »
The first paragraph of the link Steven posted above clearly states:  "You are required to be insured for an amount not less than $750 million and the amount of the maximum probable loss that may be incurred in respect of damage to third parties caused by the launch or return, as calculated in accordance with this code." {emphasis mine}

According to the attached document on page 21 it says

"Under the Act, the holder of a

• domestic launch permit (or return authorised by a launch permit),
• overseas launch certificate or
• return of an overseas launched space object

must satisfy insurance/financial requirements to an amount of not less than $750 million AUD or the amount of maximum probable loss (MPL), whichever is the lower amount. Instead of insurance, the applicant may also demonstrate direct financial responsibility for an amount of not less than 750 million AUD or MPL."

The government says

"Finding: The existing legislative requirements for insurance/financial cover are higher than the levels required by other space-faring nations and a potential inhibitor/disincentive to innovation and investment in Australia. An alternative approach which appropriately balances risk against broad Australian benefit may enable greater participation and innovation in the space sector."

"Finding: Consideration could be given to establishing scaled indemnity levels on the basis of a risk assessment process undertaken by the DIIS based on information provided by the applicant."

Hopefully this mean a more friendly regime for launch in Australia.
« Last Edit: 10/11/2017 08:55 am by Steven Pietrobon »
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Online ringsider

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Re: Gilmour Space Technologies
« Reply #29 on: 10/12/2017 06:55 am »
This is disingenuous. The current law says AU$750m OR the Maximum Probable Loss, whichever is lower.

The first paragraph of the link Steven posted above clearly states:  "You are required to be insured for an amount not less than $750 million and the amount of the maximum probable loss that may be incurred in respect of damage to third parties caused by the launch or return, as calculated in accordance with this code." {emphasis mine}

Which "current law" are you referring to??

I gave links to the current legislation in  a my post  - it's not "750m and MPL", it's "750m or MPL".
« Last Edit: 10/12/2017 06:57 am by ringsider »

Offline Steven Pietrobon

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Re: Gilmour Space Technologies
« Reply #30 on: 01/04/2018 02:15 am »
Glimour has been doing some engine testing. Short firing at 45 kN, 64% of full thrust at 70 kN.

https://www.gspacetech.com/single-post/2018/01/PR/Gilmour-Space-achieves-45kN-of-thrust-in-first-test

Gilmour Space Fires Up 45,000 Newtons Of Thrust In First Low-Pressure Test Of Hybrid Rocket Engine

January 4, 2018

MEDIA RELEASE:

Results exceed that of nearest small satellite launch competitors; 'More' expected from the rocket company's full-pressure, full-duration tests later this month.

JANUARY 4, 2018 -- Australia and Singapore-based rocket company, Gilmour Space Technologies (www.gspacetech.com), has fired up the first of its full-scale orbital engine tests in a staged program to launch small satellites to space by 2020.

​​“We conducted two successful engine tests in December, one of which was a low pressure test-fire that generated 45 kilonewtons (over 10,100 pounds-force) of thrust,” said its CEO and Founder, Adam Gilmour.

“This is significantly more thrust than some of our small satellite launch competitors’ main engines, and we expect to do much better in our full-pressure and full-duration test firings later this month." 

Since closing AUD 5 million (USD 3.7 million) in Series-A funding in mid 2017, the Queensland-based startup has been scaling up to offer low-cost launches to a growing number of small satellite players capitalising on 'New Space' or 'Space 2.0' -- from 24/7 constellation-based earth observation and communications, to satellite servicing, space mining and the Internet of Things.

Unlike most commercial rockets today that use either solid- or liquid-fuelled engines, Gilmour Space is pioneering a new breed of cheaper, safer and greener hybrid-engine rockets that combine a liquid oxidiser with a proprietary solid fuel that overcomes long-standing performance issues with traditional hybrid rockets.

In November, the company completed tests of its high-thrust 'interplanetary' CubeSat Propulsion System, which could be used to power cube-sized satellites or spacecraft to the orbit of the Moon or Mars; and in December, began ground tests of its orbital-class rocket engine.

“We started with a full-flow, mono-propellant thruster hot fire of our large catalyst pack," said Mr Gilmour. "This is a critical subsystem of our main orbital engine, and it efficiently decomposed our Hydrogen Peroxide oxidiser at a core temperature well above the ignition temperature of our fuel."

The second short-duration, low-pressure, full-flow engine test (video) further verified all critical subsystems of the orbital engine. “There was almost instant ignition in our large-diameter (46 cm) single port motor, and we generated over 45 kN of thrust,” he added. That's enough force to lift two SUVs off the ground.

“These are big achievements in hybrid rocket technology and a big leap for Australia's New Space industry,” said Mr Gilmour, whose team is targeting to launch a suborbital test rocket from Australia in the second quarter of 2018, subject to regulatory approvals.

"Despite a growing number of rocket companies and startups look to enter the small launch market today, it is notable that only a handful have progressed to actually building, testing and launching a rocket that demonstrates their technology.”

“Gilmour Space is doing it; and if all goes well, our new engine could well be the largest and most powerful privately-funded hybrid rocket engine in the world."

Watch this space.

Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Offline QuantumG

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Re: Gilmour Space Technologies
« Reply #31 on: 01/04/2018 02:18 am »
Dunno how they think they're going to get 320 s vacuum isp with this engine, or any hybrid.
Human spaceflight is basically just LARPing now.

Online ringsider

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Re: Gilmour Space Technologies
« Reply #32 on: 01/05/2018 09:03 pm »
Glimour has been doing some engine testing. Short firing at 45 kN, 64% of full thrust at 70 kN.

https://www.gspacetech.com/single-post/2018/01/PR/Gilmour-Space-achieves-45kN-of-thrust-in-first-test

Gilmour Space Fires Up 45,000 Newtons Of Thrust In First Low-Pressure Test Of Hybrid Rocket Engine

January 4, 2018

MEDIA RELEASE:

Results exceed that of nearest small satellite launch competitors; 'More' expected from the rocket company's full-pressure, full-duration tests later this month.

JANUARY 4, 2018 -- Australia and Singapore-based rocket company, Gilmour Space Technologies (www.gspacetech.com), has fired up the first of its full-scale orbital engine tests in a staged program to launch small satellites to space by 2020.

​​“We conducted two successful engine tests in December, one of which was a low pressure test-fire that generated 45 kilonewtons (over 10,100 pounds-force) of thrust,” said its CEO and Founder, Adam Gilmour.

“This is significantly more thrust than some of our small satellite launch competitors’ main engines, and we expect to do much better in our full-pressure and full-duration test firings later this month." 

Since closing AUD 5 million (USD 3.7 million) in Series-A funding in mid 2017, the Queensland-based startup has been scaling up to offer low-cost launches to a growing number of small satellite players capitalising on 'New Space' or 'Space 2.0' -- from 24/7 constellation-based earth observation and communications, to satellite servicing, space mining and the Internet of Things.

Unlike most commercial rockets today that use either solid- or liquid-fuelled engines, Gilmour Space is pioneering a new breed of cheaper, safer and greener hybrid-engine rockets that combine a liquid oxidiser with a proprietary solid fuel that overcomes long-standing performance issues with traditional hybrid rockets.

In November, the company completed tests of its high-thrust 'interplanetary' CubeSat Propulsion System, which could be used to power cube-sized satellites or spacecraft to the orbit of the Moon or Mars; and in December, began ground tests of its orbital-class rocket engine.

“We started with a full-flow, mono-propellant thruster hot fire of our large catalyst pack," said Mr Gilmour. "This is a critical subsystem of our main orbital engine, and it efficiently decomposed our Hydrogen Peroxide oxidiser at a core temperature well above the ignition temperature of our fuel."

The second short-duration, low-pressure, full-flow engine test (video) further verified all critical subsystems of the orbital engine. “There was almost instant ignition in our large-diameter (46 cm) single port motor, and we generated over 45 kN of thrust,” he added. That's enough force to lift two SUVs off the ground.

“These are big achievements in hybrid rocket technology and a big leap for Australia's New Space industry,” said Mr Gilmour, whose team is targeting to launch a suborbital test rocket from Australia in the second quarter of 2018, subject to regulatory approvals.

"Despite a growing number of rocket companies and startups look to enter the small launch market today, it is notable that only a handful have progressed to actually building, testing and launching a rocket that demonstrates their technology.”

“Gilmour Space is doing it; and if all goes well, our new engine could well be the largest and most powerful privately-funded hybrid rocket engine in the world."

Watch this space.


Interesting test. Seemed short for a hybrid? Was it slow motion?
« Last Edit: 01/05/2018 09:03 pm by ringsider »

Offline Steven Pietrobon

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Re: Gilmour Space Technologies
« Reply #33 on: 01/06/2018 05:09 am »
Interesting test. Seemed short for a hybrid? Was it slow motion?

I don't think so. As its a hybrid, they can fire the engine for as long as there is fuel remaining in the combustion chamber. As its their first test of their new motor, its a good idea to make that test short.
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Offline Steven Pietrobon

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Re: Gilmour Space Technologies
« Reply #34 on: 02/21/2018 02:38 am »
First launch of Ariel has been delayed to first quarter 2019.

February 20 2018 - 6:51PM
Aussie rocket brothers ink NASA deal as local space agency wait continues

An ambitious plan to fly low-cost rockets into space carrying nano-satellites has been given a boost as the brothers behind it reveal their start-up has signed an agreement with NASA.

Gold Coast based Gilmour Space Technologies — backed to the tune of $5 million by Australian venture capital firm Blackbird Ventures and US-based 500 Startups, among other private investors — said on Tuesday that it has entered into a Space Act Agreement with NASA to work on various research, technology development and educational initiatives.

http://www.smh.com.au/technology/innovation/aussie-rocket-brothers-ink-nasa-deal-as-local-space-agency-wait-continues-20180219-p4z0w0.html
« Last Edit: 02/21/2018 02:41 am by Steven Pietrobon »
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Offline CameronD

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Re: Gilmour Space Technologies
« Reply #35 on: 03/06/2018 08:57 pm »
Quote
Media Release: Homegrown Rocket Company Test Fires World's Largest Single-Port Hybrid Engine

For Immediate Release
----------------------------------
 
GILMOUR SPACE ACHIEVES 70,000 NEWTONS (15,700 LBS) OF THRUST IN WORLD’S LARGEST SINGLE-PORT HYBRID ENGINE TEST
 
“We are at the crossroads in commercial space with new small launch vehicles, and it’s great to see Gilmour Space becoming a serious new player in the global small launch market.”
 
-- Professor Dava Newman, MIT Apollo Program Professor of Astronautics, and former Deputy Administrator of NASA
 
March 6, 2018 – Meet G-70. This orbital-class rocket engine, developed by Australia and Singapore-based Gilmour Space Technologies (www.gspacetech.com), has successfully achieved 70,000 newtons (70 kilonewtons or 15,700 pounds-force) of thrust in what could be the world’s largest successful test fire of a single-port hybrid rocket engine.
“These results prove that we have the core technology needed to enable low-cost small satellite launches to space,” said its CEO & Founder, Adam Gilmour. The company’s mission: to carry payloads weighing up to 400 kg to low earth orbit (LEO) from 2020.
Unlike the vast majority of commercial rockets today, which use either solid- or liquid-fuelled engines, Gilmour Space is pioneering new hybrid-engine rockets that combine a liquid oxidiser with a proprietary multi-material 3D printed solid fuel. Indeed, the Queensland-based company first made headlines in 2016 when it successfully test launched a subscale rocket to an altitude of 5km using its 3D printed rocket fuel.
“We chose hybrid rockets because they’re simpler, cheaper, environmentally greener and a lot less explosive than solid or liquid rockets,” said Mr Gilmour. “But hybrids have been notoriously difficult to scale up, resulting in a relatively poor engine efficiency and performance,” he added.
Until now.
“With this and our earlier tests, Gilmour Space has demonstrated capability in what could be the largest (46 cm diameter) successful test fire of a single-port hybrid rocket engine.” Single port engines are believed to be the most fuel-efficient design for hybrid rockets.
Other key results:
•   Peak thrust of 70 kN (15,700 pounds), exceeding the performance of many small launch competitors
•   High level of thrust stability
•   Ability to throttle from 10% to 100%
“This G-70 engine will be powering our next rocket to the edge of space in the second quarter of 2018, subject to launch approvals in Australia,” said Mr Gilmour.

Enabling New Space
“We are at the crossroads in commercial space with new small launch vehicles, and it’s great to see Gilmour Space becoming a serious new player in the global small launch market,” said Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Apollo Program Professor of Astronautics, and former Deputy Administrator of NASA, Professor Dava Newman. “I congratulate Adam and his team for their incredible achievements so far, and look forward to seeing more of such innovative engineering from this promising young rocket company.”
Last month, Gilmour Space announced it had signed a Space Act Agreement with NASA to collaborate on various space research and technology development initiatives. This news was warmly welcomed by Australia’s Minister for Defence Industry, Hon Christopher Pyne MP, who reiterated the Government’s vision in advancing Australia’s space capabilities.
 
“What Gilmour Space is doing right now is just amazing. Their dedicated, low cost launch capability will be critical for companies like Fleet to secure and maintain our competitiveness in space,” said Flavia Tata Nardini, CEO & Co-Founder of South Australia-based Fleet Space Technologies, which is working on globally connecting the Internet of Things using a fleet of small low-cost satellites.
Interested to launch? Bookings for Gilmour Space’s commercial launches from 2020 will be open the second half of this year. Register your interest here.
Game on.
###

About Gilmour Space Technologies
Gilmour Space Technologies is an Australia and Singapore-based rocket company that is developing low-cost launch vehicles for the small satellite/payload market.
Key milestones since beginning its rocket program in 2015
June 2016: Gilmour Space first made headlines when it successfully flew the countries' first privately developed hybrid rocket to an altitude of 5 Km using proprietary 3D printed fuel (reportedly a world-first demonstration).
June 2017: It raised AUD 5 million (USD 3.7 million) in Series-A funding from venture capital firms Blackbird Ventures and 500 Startups, among others. Gilmour Space has also been awarded various R&D grants in Singapore and Australia.
August 2017: The company successfully ground tested a high-impulse Cubesat Propulsion System, which could potentially power a 1U cubesat to the orbit of the Moon or Mars.
 
January 2018: It announced the results of its first full-scale orbital engine test, which generated 45 kN in a low-pressure test fire.
 
February 2018: Gilmour Space revealed that it signed a Space Act Agreement with NASA to collaborate on various space research and technology development initiatives.
Considered one of the leading space startups in Australia and Singapore, Gilmour Space is now scaling up to launch their first rockets to suborbital space in 2018, and to LEO in 2020. 

Website: https://www.gspacetech.com  |  General enquiries: [email protected]

MEDIA CONTACTS
Michelle Tan
Director, Marketing & Communications
Gilmour Space Technologies
Email: [email protected]
 
Singapore Tel: (+65) 9106 6714
Australia Tel: (+61) 0408 973 296 – James Gilmour (Director & Co-Founder)
Facebook: Gilmourspacetech  |  Twitter: @GilmourSpace  |  LinkedIn: Gilmour Space Technologies
_______________________


Maybe VG need to talk to Gilmour about rocket engines...  ;)
« Last Edit: 03/06/2018 09:09 pm by CameronD »
With sufficient thrust, pigs fly just fine - however, this is not necessarily a good idea. It is hard to be sure where they are
going to land, and it could be dangerous sitting under them as they fly overhead.

Offline Steven Pietrobon

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Re: Gilmour Space Technologies
« Reply #36 on: 03/07/2018 01:14 am »
Here's the video of the test. Thrust is 70 kN with the test lasting about 9 seconds from ignition to cutoff. The SpaceShipTwo (SS2) motor is 267 kN. Bundling four of the G-70's would give 280 kN, probably sufficient for SS2.

Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Offline Yeknom-Ecaps

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Re: Gilmour Space Technologies
« Reply #37 on: 03/11/2018 03:28 am »
Seems like tests in December, January and February leading up to the March 5 70Kn test.

Anyone know the actual dates of the earlier tests?

Thanks.

Offline Steven Pietrobon

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Re: Gilmour Space Technologies
« Reply #38 on: 05/28/2018 07:19 am »
https://shoutout.wix.com/so/9MDsw3BZ?cid=0#/main

GILMOUR SPACE PREPARES FOR SUBORBITAL HYBRID ROCKET LAUNCH WITH 75 KN (16,900 LBS) TEST-FIRE

“Our low-cost launch capability could provide a significant comparative (and competitive) advantage to Australia and Singapore’s new space industry.”

- Adam Gilmour, CEO & Founder, Gilmour Space Technologies

AUSTRALIA & SINGAPORE, MAY 28, 2018 – Homegrown rocket company, Gilmour Space Technologies, has completed a longer duration test-fire of its proprietary hybrid rocket engine, bringing it one step closer to launching Australia and Singapore's first privately-developed commercial rockets to space.

“This was a 12-second static fire of what will be our first-stage orbital rocket engine. It demonstrated stable thrust, and peaked at 75 kilonewtons (or 16,900 pounds) of force,” said the company’s CEO and Founder, Adam Gilmour. An earlier test in March had generated 70 kN, reportedly then the world’s largest successful test of a single-port hybrid rocket engine.

“75 kN marks a new record for this engine, and is more than what we will need for our coming suborbital and orbital launches,” he added.

Next stop: Suborbital space

Gilmour Space is planning a suborbital test launch in the third quarter, and is working with the Australian Civil Aviation Safety Authority (CASA) to approve this launch from a remote private property in Queensland.

“Our first test rocket launch in mid 2016 was a sub-scale demonstration of our new hybrid engine technology, and its success led to our Series A investment,” he explained.

“The next launch will be the flight test of a full-scale engine, which we plan to use in the first stage of our Eris orbital rocket.” 'Eris' is the company's three-stage hybrid rocket dedicated to launching small satellites (up to 400 kg) to Low Earth Orbit by 2020.

“It will also be a test of our mobile launch platform, which we've designed to enable rapid and low-cost launches from remote locations,” he added. "Interestingly, this capability for responsive launch is one that other countries like the US, Europe and UK are trying very hard to develop right now."

Being new, being nimble

This latest test-fire comes just over a week after the Australian government officially launched the Australian Space Agency and released details of a nine-month space industry review.

The report included recommendations to support 'next generation’ rocket propulsion systems, and make necessary changes to the Space Activities Act to enable commercial small satellite launches from Australia.

"With Gilmour Space's technology and low-cost launch capabilities, small satellite launches could easily be a 'low-hanging fruit' for Australia. As one of the front-runners in today's global small launch market, we look forward to working with commercial, civil and defence partners to build a stronger and more vibrant domestic space industry in Australia and Singapore."

To the stars.

###

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« Last Edit: 05/28/2018 07:20 am by Steven Pietrobon »
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Offline Steven Pietrobon

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Re: Gilmour Space Technologies
« Reply #39 on: 07/24/2018 07:25 am »
https://www.gspacetech.com/single-post/2018/07/19/PR/Gilmour-Space-appoints-senior-space-experts-to-Advisory-Board

Gilmour Space appoints senior space experts to Advisory Board

July 19, 2018

Appointments include ex-space shuttle commander, Colonel Pamela Melroy; and NASA's former deputy administrator, Professor Dava Newman.

AUSTRALIA & SINGAPORE, JULY 19, 2018 – Gilmour Space Technologies, a leading rocket company in Australia and Singapore, today announced the appointment of two space veterans to its advisory board as it prepares to enter the global small launch market in 2020.
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

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