Author Topic: Skyroot Aerospace  (Read 40007 times)

Offline vyoma

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Skyroot Aerospace
« on: 06/25/2019 05:10 am »
Skyroot Aerospace is an Indian launch vehicle startup, founded by ex-ISRO folks. They have envisioned "Vikram" series of launch vehicles that use solid state and Methalox engines. Check out their "Vikram" launch vehicle series here: https://skyroot.in/launch-vehicle/

Offline demonslayer

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Re: Skyroot Aerospace
« Reply #1 on: 06/25/2019 01:36 pm »
Quite an interesting time in the Indian space arena.

Offline PonRam

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Re: Skyroot Aerospace
« Reply #2 on: 10/15/2019 11:12 pm »
https://yourstory.com/2019/10/tech-30-spacetech-startup-isro-scientist-launch-vehicle

If they can successfully pull it off, it will be great!!!

Offline TrevorMonty

Re: Skyroot Aerospace
« Reply #3 on: 10/16/2019 04:03 am »
https://yourstory.com/2019/10/tech-30-spacetech-startup-isro-scientist-launch-vehicle

If they can successfully pull it off, it will be great!!!
They definitely have expert team with connections that would allow them hire to skilled engineers. Just need finanicial backing.
Indian should be able to support one or two local small LV companies.

I do find this extract from article to be putting horse before cart, given they are only powerpoint rockets at this stage.

:Skyroot claims to be the only company in the world that can carry payloads ranging from 200-700 kg to a low Earth orbit."
« Last Edit: 10/16/2019 04:06 am by TrevorMonty »

Offline TheVarun

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Re: Skyroot Aerospace
« Reply #4 on: 10/16/2019 05:49 am »
 ^

Yes, they are talking too big at the moment! But seeing an Indian private sector company actually build and launch its own vehicles will be amazing when it happens.   Incidentally, what happened to Team Indus a.k.a Axiom Labs. They seem to have receded into the background.  They had pretty big plans of building their own rover, and launching it on a non-Indian rocket sometime in 2020.  Hope they are quietly working on that!

Offline PM3

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Re: Skyroot Aerospace
« Reply #5 on: 05/16/2020 01:59 pm »
Go!

https://twitter.com/isro/status/1261645209173024769

Quote from: ISRO
Department of Space will follow Government guidelines and enable Private players to carry out space activities in the country.
"Never, never be afraid of the truth." -- Jim Bridenstine

Offline K210

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Re: Skyroot Aerospace
« Reply #6 on: 05/18/2020 06:24 am »
Go!

https://twitter.com/isro/status/1261645209173024769

Quote from: ISRO
Department of Space will follow Government guidelines and enable Private players to carry out space activities in the country.

From my understanding it is only for PSLV/SSLV activities.

Offline PM3

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Re: Skyroot Aerospace
« Reply #7 on: 05/18/2020 06:39 am »
Quote from: ISRO
Department of Space will follow Government guidelines and enable Private players to carry out space activities in the country.

From my understanding it is only for PSLV/SSLV activities.

I think it relates to the "Space Activities Bill, 2017", a legislative proposal to allow private spaceflight in India. (On the other hand, don't see any confirmation that this bill has been signed into law...)

« Last Edit: 05/18/2020 06:45 am by PM3 »
"Never, never be afraid of the truth." -- Jim Bridenstine

Offline PonRam

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Re: Skyroot Aerospace upper stage engine firing
« Reply #8 on: 08/14/2020 01:01 am »
https://www.msn.com/en-in/news/other/hyderabad-startup-skyroot-aerospace-test-fires-upper-stage-rocket-engine-e2-80-9craman-e2-80-9d/ar-BB17UqI5

Skyroot Aerospace seems to be on track. Hope they can get their engine, stage and rocket ready as well.

"Two of the firmís rocket stages are getting ready for test firing in six months" - so there will be more coming up in the next 6 months.

Offline sanman

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Re: Skyroot Aerospace
« Reply #9 on: 08/14/2020 05:11 am »
Skyroot has done a successful test-firing of its upper stage engine:




EDIT: The engine runs on  ̶m̶e̶t̶h̶a̶n̶e̶-̶l̶o̶x̶  hydrazine, and is capable of multiple re-starts.

It's called the Raman engine and is named after Indian Nobel laureate in physics, Dr CV Raman.
« Last Edit: 08/14/2020 07:09 pm by sanman »

Offline TrevorMonty

Re: Skyroot Aerospace
« Reply #10 on: 08/14/2020 02:54 pm »
Skyroot has done a successful test-firing of its upper stage engine:




The engine runs on methane-lox, and is capable of multiple re-starts.

It's called the Raman engine and is named after Indian Nobel laureate in physics, Dr CV Raman.
1st and 2nd stages are SRBs. Kind of mini Omega. They even plan to use strap on SRBs for additional thrust, like Omega.

Not sure if US engine is pressure or turbo fed. Could start flying with simpler pressure and upgrade to turbo engine later.
« Last Edit: 08/14/2020 02:57 pm by TrevorMonty »

Offline sanman

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Re: Skyroot Aerospace
« Reply #11 on: 08/14/2020 07:29 pm »
The engine runs on methane-lox, and is capable of multiple re-starts.

It's called the Raman engine and is named after Indian Nobel laureate in physics, Dr CV Raman.
1st and 2nd stages are SRBs. Kind of mini Omega. They even plan to use strap on SRBs for additional thrust, like Omega.

Not sure if US engine is pressure or turbo fed. Could start flying with simpler pressure and upgrade to turbo engine later.

Apologies, I need to quickly correct -- people have told me this engine that was just demonstrated runs on hydrazine (UDMH-N2O4), and that it is indeed pressure-fed.
This hypergolic engine will be used as their 4th-stage engine on their initial rocket, called Vikram-1, which is a 4-stage rocket.

They are still developing a methane-lox engine, which will be used for the 3rd-stage engine on their subsequent follow-on rockets, Vikram-2 and Vikram-3.

https://skyroot.in/launch-vehicle/
« Last Edit: 08/21/2020 01:35 pm by sanman »

Offline PonRam

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Re: Skyroot Aerospace
« Reply #12 on: 08/18/2020 08:27 am »
For a new startup, they have kept the rocket very simple with solids and this upper stage engine is simple as well thus reducing all the risks - good strategy. In the next few months we will hear about their solid motor test firing as well. If any of the indian LV startups will be successful and on time with their deliveries, it will likely be this one. Hope they get their next round of funding.

Offline K210

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Re: Skyroot Aerospace
« Reply #13 on: 08/19/2020 09:11 am »
Out of all indian small sat launcher startups skyroot probably has the best chance of succeeding. They have a very grounded realistic approach of taking advantage of existing solid fuel infrastructure in the country and limiting use of liquid fuel to only upper stage. This cuts cost/complexity and development time significantly, would not be surprised if they beat bellatrix aerospace to orbit at the rate they are moving. Having actual hardware on the test stand to demonstrate to public and potential investors of course also greatly helps their credibility. 
« Last Edit: 08/19/2020 09:12 am by K210 »

Offline SƿɑϲϵX

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Re: Skyroot Aerospace
« Reply #14 on: 08/19/2020 05:03 pm »
Skyroot First Indian Aerospace On Mark To Race With Competitors Blue Origin And SpaceX.

BY BENAK RAAJ SHETTY ∑ AUGUST 19, 2020

History Of Aviation Industry Start And India Role.
Soon after world war II how the aviation industry started. And today how the United States, Russia, France and Britain are ruling the aviation industry. Its always said that ďhistory repeats again and againĒ itís correct.

If we go back in time we can see the airline industry started its race soon after world war II. There were many companies which revolutionalized with the speed, Capacity and also use of airline for commercial service.

In todayís world its space exploration time. Well, India could not do much because we had seen our independence back then. The country was struggling with a shortage of food. Because of unbearable British Loot In India, we suffered a lot and it was trying to overcome the problem.

But Today Everything has changed in India and its time to showcase the real might to the world.

...

https://www.marquestech.in/blog/skyroot-first-indian-aerospace/

Offline TrevorMonty

Re: Skyroot Aerospace
« Reply #15 on: 08/19/2020 05:19 pm »
Their main competition is RL not Blue or SpaceX. Article is for general public and investors that don't know industry.

They design and keep it simple approach is good, hope they make it to orbit.


Offline sanman

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Re: Skyroot Aerospace
« Reply #16 on: 08/21/2020 12:38 pm »
So I was just comparing their prospective launch vehicles


So they all have solid motors for the lower stages. Their initial Vikram-1 would have the uppermost stage powered by hydrazine. The follow-on Vikram-2 & Vikram-3 would have their  ̶u̶p̶p̶e̶r̶m̶o̶s̶t̶ ̶s̶t̶a̶g̶e̶  next-uppermost/penultimate stage powered by methalox, once that's developed. The Vikram-3 would feature solid strap-ons as well.

So their goal is to use the simplest technologies they can, in order to get started and get to market sooner. They can then develop better technologies in the meantime.

But once you develop the higher-Isp methalox engine, and use it to replace the 3rd stage, then what are your best upgrade paths from there?

Would you eventually try to cluster methalox engines and make that your central core, adding SRBs around it, Ariane-style?

Competing against Rocket Lab becomes harder as they achieve reusability on their booster.
We've now seen the 6th consecutive re-use of a Falcon-9 booster, and once Rocket Lab successfully recovers its booster with its electrical turbopumps, they may likely succeed at multiple re-flights as well, further lowering their costs.

If Skyroot were to develop a methalox engine, and then eventually use it as a the basis for a methalox core stage, then that would open up the possibility for its recovery and re-use as well. Since methalox doesn't suffer as badly from the coking problem as Electron's RP-1, then it allows for more potential re-flights per booster.

On the other hand, even solid boosters have demonstrated the ability to be recovered and re-used, such as the US Space Shuttle's SRBs, which were even able to splash down in the ocean via parachute, without having to be caught or spared from seawater.

Could solid core stages on a small rocket be more economically recovered and refurbished for re-use?

If Skyroot's primary goal of getting to market asap is reflected in their initial technology choices, then would a secondary goal of further reducing launch costs asap by finding a path toward re-use then be the next best focus of their technical efforts?
« Last Edit: 08/23/2020 07:56 am by sanman »

Offline Redclaws

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Re: Skyroot Aerospace
« Reply #17 on: 08/21/2020 12:54 pm »
Iíve always understood that solid booster reuse was much less appealing because the fuel is a much larger percentage of the total cost, perhaps the majority?  As contrasted to using industrially produced liquids which are added at launch, it uses a chemically and structurally complex version of an *explosive* which must be cast in a specialized facility and transported with the rocket body.

Additionally, I think the booster structure itself is simpler - no tanks, Ďjustí a void.  (Iím sure thatís oversimplifying). That makes it cheaper, but further drives down the value of reuse.

Offline sanman

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Re: Skyroot Aerospace
« Reply #18 on: 08/22/2020 12:01 am »
Okay, so I just want to make another correction here to what I previously said. I previously thought that they would later introduce a methalox engine to replace the uppermost hypergolic stage on their initial vehicle, but instead their plan is that the methalox engine would replace the solid motor stage immediately below the hypergolic one.

But why do it that way? That then gives you a launch stack with 3 different propellant technologies to manage and operate.
Why keep that uppermost hypergolic engine, instead of having the new methalox engine replace both the hypergolic and the solid motor immediately below it? What possible advantage would a hypergolic engine offer that a methalox engine doesn't? Does hypergolic perhaps offer slightly more precise control for a more precise injection of the payload into orbit?

EDIT: Maybe that's it - maybe the methalox engine wouldn't be restartable, and only the hypergolic one is. So the upper methalox stage on Vikram-2 & 3 would improve the Isp  and deltaV (poor man's CUS?), while the uppermost hypergolic stage then does the precise orbital injection, including even possible multi-orbit injection due to restartability.
But where do you evolve from there? What's the easiest upgrade path? Clustering of liquid engines? Making methalox engine more precisely controllable and restartable? Upgrade from smaller strap-ons to larger parallel SRBs?
« Last Edit: 08/23/2020 07:52 am by sanman »

Offline demonslayer

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Re: Skyroot Aerospace
« Reply #19 on: 08/26/2020 07:00 am »
Methalox stages need insulation and also suffer from boil off requiring extra mass. So this wouldnít be useful for a small launcher if they need a low thrust propulsion system for orbital injection.
« Last Edit: 09/24/2022 05:44 am by zubenelgenubi »

 

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