Author Topic: Why was there a stigma against sci fi in the 2000s and early 2010s?  (Read 2061 times)

Offline CmdrShepN7

  • Member
  • Posts: 21
  • Liked: 3
  • Likes Given: 1
It seemed like during the 2000s and early 2010s people who watched fantasy shows and "Battlestar Galactica" were seen as "People who lived in basements".

Once Game of Thrones showed up it seemed like the stigma was erased virtually overnight but I don't seen TV watchers flocking to shows like "The Expanse".

Hopefully the "Three Body Problem" does for sci fi what GOT did for fantasy.



https://www.theverge.com/2020/9/1/21410210/netflix-the-three-body-problem-benioff-weiss-adapation

And hopefully "For All Mankind" can suck in more mainstream viewers too.

Why were TV watchers less open minded about sci fi and fantasy in the 2000s?

In the early 2010s it seemed like cable TV hit the "idiot button".

Offline daedalus1

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 667
  • uk
  • Liked: 338
  • Likes Given: 0
I read the book 'Three Body Problem'. Good read.

Offline Blackstar

  • Veteran
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 13869
  • Liked: 6081
  • Likes Given: 2
It seemed like during the 2000s and early 2010s people who watched fantasy shows and "Battlestar Galactica" were seen as "People who lived in basements".

That characterization of science fiction as something only nerds and outcasts paid attention to has been around for a very long time. Arguably, the Marvel movies, starting with "Iron Man," changed a lot of that. Robert Meyer Burnett, a filmmaker and editor, has referred to this as the "Post-Geek Singularity," when everything changed and comic book movies, sci-fi, and fantasy became totally mainstream. One could argue that there were major milestones before then--Star Trek and particularly Star Wars which reached much broader audiences--but the domination of popular culture by fantasy, sci-fi, and comic book/superhero movies is a relatively recent event.

Online Coastal Ron

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7925
  • I live... along the coast
  • Liked: 9242
  • Likes Given: 11009
It seemed like during the 2000s and early 2010s people who watched fantasy shows and "Battlestar Galactica" were seen as "People who lived in basements".

As someone that watched the original Star Trek TV show live on TV, and watched MANY other science fiction movies and TV shows, I would say that I don't understand your premise. Science fiction has been around a long time, and has always been considered a niche genre, but not something that you had to keep hidden.

And Game of Thrones is NOT science fiction, it is in the fantasy genre.

And in any case, it is the stories that hook people, not that it is "science fiction". Battlestar Galactica, the 2004 version, told interesting and engaging stories, as did The Expanse. It just so happens that those stories took place in a future or imagined timeline.

Michael Bay has made $Billions in revenue from making "science fiction" movies like the Transformer series, Armageddon, and such. To me those were more "fantasy" than "science", but they certainly showed that there was a market for storytelling that takes place in a fictional future.

And the same can be said for science fiction books, in that I have never known of anyone that had to hide the fact they were reading them - not when plenty of people read "trash" novels for pure entertainment purposes (you know who you are...  ;)).

Quote
And hopefully "For All Mankind" can suck in more mainstream viewers too.

Why were TV watchers less open minded about sci fi and fantasy in the 2000s?

They weren't.

Quote
In the early 2010s it seemed like cable TV hit the "idiot button".

I disagree.
If we don't continuously lower the cost to access space, how are we ever going to afford to expand humanity out into space?

Online Thorny

  • Regular
  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 866
  • San Angelo, Texas
  • Liked: 268
  • Likes Given: 427
It seemed like during the 2000s and early 2010s people who watched fantasy shows and "Battlestar Galactica" were seen as "People who lived in basements".

That's nothing new. Science Fiction as a whole has always been looked down upon by mainstream media as something only nerds and geeks like. The 2000s did have some popular sci-fi, though, such as Eureka, The 4400 and Stargate. There was also the hugely popular Lost and the long list of failed series that tried to recreate its success (Flashforward, Surface, The Event, etc.)

And hopefully "For All Mankind" can suck in more mainstream viewers too.

It probably won't. Apple TV+ is still a small player compared to Netflix, Amazon, Disney, or even Paramount+ and does not release its original material on home video or other streaming services. So the only way to watch it is to pay Apple, and there just isn't enough incentive for most people to pay for another streaming service. That's a shame, because For All Mankind and Ted Lasso are great.
« Last Edit: 06/09/2022 10:59 pm by Thorny »

Offline Steve G

  • Regular
  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 463
  • Ottawa, ON
    • Stephen H Garrity
  • Liked: 489
  • Likes Given: 36
There's a lot of science fiction out there, but it's just awful stuff. Most have too much youth, leading to high-school immaturity, the themes are increasingly dark, too many social statements and not enough storylines that matter. No, men and women soldiers in the future will never have shared showers unless men are genetically altered to not being complete jerks. Calling women officers "Sir" is also a bit tiresome. The writers have never opened an astronomy book and always get the science woefully wrong, and don't even talk to me about Star Trek Discovery or Picard. (Strange New Worlds is an improvement.)

I tried to watch Bruce Willis in Breach, and it was pathetic. They even used an old Panasonic MX-50 video editing board (which I used in the early 2000s) as a control panel. The Expanse is very good except the same-old trap of using current hairstyles for the future, where men don't shave and look like slobs but women are expected to keep their underarms and legs completely hairless.

If anyone out there that has some suggestions, please let us know!

Offline ninjaneer

  • Member
  • Posts: 53
  • Liked: 33
  • Likes Given: 94
It seemed like during the 2000s and early 2010s people who watched fantasy shows and "Battlestar Galactica" were seen as "People who lived in basements".

Correct me if I'm wrong, but you're mentioning the time frame that started approximately with the Lord of the Rings trilogy and Harry Potter, breezed through Avatar and some Twilight stuff among other things, and ended with The Hunger Games.

Offline Metalskin

  • Member
  • Posts: 37
  • Brisbane, Australia
  • Liked: 20
  • Likes Given: 682
It seemed like during the 2000s and early 2010s people who watched fantasy shows and "Battlestar Galactica" were seen as "People who lived in basements".

Def not true (from my experience and awareness of relevant pop culture). The meme about basement living was mostly associated with computer geeks, especially hackers.

The basement stereotype normally had a long haired, possibly overweight male, living at their mother's home in the basement, pizza boxes everywhere and spending their whole time either hacking online and/or hacking hardware. Often they would have multiple monitors, and bits of hardware everywhere.

A good example of this meme is the 2007 Die Hard move called Live Free and Die Hard. Though even in that movie they demonstrated different types of computer geeks.

I have been a science fiction fan from the 80s as a teenager through to now and my experience has not shown this to be true.
I've never watched C-beams glitter in the dark near Tannhäuser Gate

Offline Zaum

  • Member
  • Posts: 12
  • Liked: 2
  • Likes Given: 30
No, men and women soldiers in the future will never have shared showers unless men are genetically altered to not being complete jerks.

Maybe off-topic, but I wanted to say that I disagree on this bit. Social conventions have a lot of flexibility and can move at least as fast as technology. If you look back in history, somewhere or somewhen you will find many unusual customs or forms of organization. Exploring these changes, even in the form of small details like the one you mentioned, can make the story more interesting. It's not something related to more recent works since many of the classic authors of sf have done this. Heinlein had definitely opened an astronomy book but still felt like bringing up the idea that only women should be spaceship pilots in Starship Troopers, or the polyamory in The Moon is a Harsh Mistress (does jealousy have to be genetically removed too?).

You said that it's ridiculous that TV shows set in the future use the same hairstyles as today. I think it'd be just as ridiculous to depict a spacefaring society, perhaps several centuries or more from now, to be exactly like the one we live in.
« Last Edit: 06/11/2022 09:35 pm by Zaum »

Offline Steve G

  • Regular
  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 463
  • Ottawa, ON
    • Stephen H Garrity
  • Liked: 489
  • Likes Given: 36
I don't disagree. Just ditch the punk hairstyles. And maybe in the future, tattoos will be out of style. Most currently produced shows in the future have a darker dystopian feel too it. Got help us all, even Star Trek Discovery and Picard are darker, destroying Gene Rodenberry's vision of Star Trek of a humanity that has moved passed our cultural differences, and is why those shows are so much despised by traditional Trekkies.

Offline Vahe231991

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 702
  • 11 Canyon Terrace
  • Liked: 168
  • Likes Given: 57
The stigma against sci-fi movies regarding imaginary aspects of space travel isn't going away -- anyone who watches Star Trek and would love to see mankind travel to distant stars in spaceships able to travel at the speed of flight will be in for a rude awakening when they learn that Albert Einstein's theory of relativity makes clear that time slows everything down. The recent Russian ASAT test earlier this year will give certain people reason to stigmatize Star Wars because they probably know that a space war won't happen in their lifetimes, especially after the White House announced a ban on ASAT tests.

 

Advertisement NovaTech
Advertisement SkyTale Software GmbH
Advertisement Northrop Grumman
Advertisement
Advertisement Brady Kenniston
Advertisement NextSpaceflight
Advertisement Nathan Barker Photography
0