Author Topic: The Orville: New Horizons (Season 3)  (Read 7370 times)

Offline CameronD

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Re: The Orville: New Horizons (Season 3)
« Reply #40 on: 08/07/2022 11:24 pm »
The Orville has their version of the Prime Directive and this episode sought to explain that better. It was a bit ham-fisted, shoving a character from the second season into the episode rather suddenly so that one of the characters on the ship could then spend a number of scenes explaining stuff to her. But I thought that what they did was intelligent, at least in terms of dialogue. We were told that the technology doesn't make things better, the people have to be better before they are ready for the technology. And we're shown an example where the Union did share their technology with a society that was not ready and it went very badly. So they have their reasons.

However, there is something that they didn't really explain, which is sort of key to their whole non-interference directive: when and how do they determine it is okay to make contact? Star Trek had a shortcut to this: if a race had created warp technology, then it was okay to contact them. That makes sense, because if they have warp drive, they're going to travel around the galaxy and eventually run into you, so it's okay for you to contact them. If the Union had that same rule, I did not hear it.

And if you think about it too much (I think about stuff too much), the logic starts to fall apart. Look at the Krill: they have advanced technology, and yet they're brutal and a threat. So it's not like a society evolves to a point where they can handle their technology responsibly. The premise is rather wobbly.

The other obvious problem--and Star Trek faced this too--is that other advanced races may not have the same attitude. So the Union won't interfere with a primitive planet, but somebody else might. What happens is the Krill go to a planet and give them all kinds of tech and really mess things up, and the Union has its hands-off policy? That planet could be even more messed-up, and it could become an ally (or slaves) to the Krill.

Yeah, it's just a TV show. But there's a risk when you start coming up with a premise like this and then stating it in an episode. It creates restrictions and contradictions that can cause problems for later episodes and for the logic of the created universe.

For all the reasons you outline, I think it's just as well they left this one until the last episode.  Now the writers have a choice - either (a) address it properly next time around or (b) forget about it entirely.

FWIW, I did enjoy the way they handled the Kaylon fleet turning up to the wedding (tiny little Orville was rather out-numbered!), plus the way the Kaylon acted during the service...  Clever.  Just very clever.
With sufficient thrust, pigs fly just fine - however, this is not necessarily a good idea. It is hard to be sure where they are
going to land, and it could be dangerous sitting under them as they fly overhead.

Online Blackstar

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Re: The Orville: New Horizons (Season 3)
« Reply #41 on: 08/08/2022 12:05 am »
1-For all the reasons you outline, I think it's just as well they left this one until the last episode.  Now the writers have a choice - either (a) address it properly next time around or (b) forget about it entirely.

2-FWIW, I did enjoy the way they handled the Kaylon fleet turning up to the wedding (tiny little Orville was rather out-numbered!), plus the way the Kaylon acted during the service...  Clever.  Just very clever.



1-I have to go watch the original episode where they visited that planet. I don't think I saw it before. Okay, I just looked it up and it aired in October 2017, so are we really expected to remember that episode four years later? Then again, lots of people are being exposed to the show for the first time now, so time is irrelevant, lunchtime doubly so.

I'm rambling.

Season 1 episodes: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Orville_(season_1)


I think that Seth McFarlane, who wrote the season 3 finale episode, probably had that idea in his head for awhile. This episode had A and B storylines, so they figured they had enough for half an episode but not all of one. I doubt that they'll really revisit the issue again.

2-I agree. I thought that was funny, and it showed once again how Issac is oblivious to certain social and cultural norms. It never occurred to him that having the entire Kaylon fleet show up might be a bit weird. And I enjoyed the rather low-key way that was a theme for much of the episode: he asked the doctor to marry him, but really doesn't understand social interactions until he is forced to learn them. I think that approach is interesting and amusing. He hasn't picked this stuff up by living among humans for a long time, but he does learn with each new interaction.
« Last Edit: 08/08/2022 12:09 am by Blackstar »

Online Blackstar

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