Author Topic: African Space Agency (AfSA)  (Read 5686 times)

Online Tywin

African Space Agency (AfSA)
« on: 01/02/2022 06:19 am »
Will Africa develop an orbital launcher in this decade?

And will it launch its first probe to a celestial body in this decade?


https://africanews.space/african-union-executive-council-approves-african-space-agency-structure/
« Last Edit: 01/03/2022 07:46 am by zubenelgenubi »
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Offline zubenelgenubi

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Re: African Space Agency (AfSA)
« Reply #1 on: 01/03/2022 07:54 am »
Will Africa develop an orbital launcher in this decade?

And will it launch its first probe to a celestial body in this decade?

https://africanews.space/african-union-executive-council-approves-african-space-agency-structure/ [dated Oct 21, 2021]

Unfortunately, neither of your questions are addressed in the article.

Quote
Domiciled in Egypt, the structure of AfSA would facilitate the human resources needed for the operationalization of the Agency. The agency is expected to commence operations in 2022 after the appointment of the leadership and workforce of the agency.

This appears to be follow-through on a 2016 African Union decision.  I sincerely hope it will not be a do-nothing supranational bureaucracy.
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Offline Vahe231991

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Re: African Space Agency (AfSA)
« Reply #2 on: 02/04/2022 03:06 am »
Will Africa develop an orbital launcher in this decade?

And will it launch its first probe to a celestial body in this decade?

https://africanews.space/african-union-executive-council-approves-african-space-agency-structure/ [dated Oct 21, 2021]

Unfortunately, neither of your questions are addressed in the article.

Quote
Domiciled in Egypt, the structure of AfSA would facilitate the human resources needed for the operationalization of the Agency. The agency is expected to commence operations in 2022 after the appointment of the leadership and workforce of the agency.

This appears to be follow-through on a 2016 African Union decision.  I sincerely hope it will not be a do-nothing supranational bureaucracy.
South Africa has its own space agency, the South African National Space Agency (SANSA), in case anyone's aware. South Africa worked on its own SLVs, the RSA-3 and RSA-4 (both derived from the Jericho missile), during the last years of the apartheid regime in South Africa, but the RSA-3 only got as far as three suborbital launches. Someday the SANSA could revive the RSA-3/4 in a much more modernized form with indigenous tracking systems and up-to-date rocket engine technology.
« Last Edit: 06/23/2022 11:44 pm by Vahe231991 »

Online Tywin

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Offline M.E.T.

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Re: African Space Agency (AfSA)
« Reply #4 on: 02/03/2023 05:40 am »
Will Africa develop an orbital launcher in this decade?

And will it launch its first probe to a celestial body in this decade?

https://africanews.space/african-union-executive-council-approves-african-space-agency-structure/ [dated Oct 21, 2021]

Unfortunately, neither of your questions are addressed in the article.

Quote
Domiciled in Egypt, the structure of AfSA would facilitate the human resources needed for the operationalization of the Agency. The agency is expected to commence operations in 2022 after the appointment of the leadership and workforce of the agency.

This appears to be follow-through on a 2016 African Union decision.  I sincerely hope it will not be a do-nothing supranational bureaucracy.
South Africa has its own space agency, the South African National Space Agency (SANSA), in case anyone's aware. South Africa worked on its own SLVs, the RSA-3 and RSA-4 (both derived from the Jericho missile), during the last years of the apartheid regime in South Africa, but the RSA-3 only got as far as three suborbital launches. Someday the SANSA could revive the RSA-3/4 in a much more modernized form with indigenous tracking systems and up-to-date rocket engine technology.

South Africa also had a nuclear weapons program that produced 6 operational warheads, which were dismantled before the 1994 democratic elections. Since then there has been a monumental brain drain as former experts retired and their replacements left the country. Today South Africa produces about half the electricity it generated in 1994, and suffers from ongoing, crippling rolling power blackouts to prevent a total grid collapse.

Point being, South Africa’s rocket program is about as likely to be revived as its former nuclear program - which means zero chance of it happening in the next 30 years, if ever.
« Last Edit: 02/03/2023 05:51 am by M.E.T. »

Offline Vahe231991

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Re: African Space Agency (AfSA)
« Reply #5 on: 02/04/2023 04:36 pm »
Will Africa develop an orbital launcher in this decade?

And will it launch its first probe to a celestial body in this decade?

https://africanews.space/african-union-executive-council-approves-african-space-agency-structure/ [dated Oct 21, 2021]

Unfortunately, neither of your questions are addressed in the article.

Quote
Domiciled in Egypt, the structure of AfSA would facilitate the human resources needed for the operationalization of the Agency. The agency is expected to commence operations in 2022 after the appointment of the leadership and workforce of the agency.

This appears to be follow-through on a 2016 African Union decision.  I sincerely hope it will not be a do-nothing supranational bureaucracy.
South Africa has its own space agency, the South African National Space Agency (SANSA), in case anyone's aware. South Africa worked on its own SLVs, the RSA-3 and RSA-4 (both derived from the Jericho missile), during the last years of the apartheid regime in South Africa, but the RSA-3 only got as far as three suborbital launches. Someday the SANSA could revive the RSA-3/4 in a much more modernized form with indigenous tracking systems and up-to-date rocket engine technology.

South Africa also had a nuclear weapons program that produced 6 operational warheads, which were dismantled before the 1994 democratic elections. Since then there has been a monumental brain drain as former experts retired and their replacements left the country. Today South Africa produces about half the electricity it generated in 1994, and suffers from ongoing, crippling rolling power blackouts to prevent a total grid collapse.

Point being, South Africa’s rocket program is about as likely to be revived as its former nuclear program - which means zero chance of it happening in the next 30 years, if ever.
South Africa will surely revive its space program, but the country is planning to increasing rely on renewable energy for electricity needs in the future and in no way is going to revive a nuclear program. Despite having developed nuclear weapons in the 1980s, South Africa did not have any real geopolitical rivals in southern Africa.

Offline M.E.T.

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Re: African Space Agency (AfSA)
« Reply #6 on: 02/05/2023 02:00 am »
Will Africa develop an orbital launcher in this decade?

And will it launch its first probe to a celestial body in this decade?

https://africanews.space/african-union-executive-council-approves-african-space-agency-structure/ [dated Oct 21, 2021]

Unfortunately, neither of your questions are addressed in the article.

Quote
Domiciled in Egypt, the structure of AfSA would facilitate the human resources needed for the operationalization of the Agency. The agency is expected to commence operations in 2022 after the appointment of the leadership and workforce of the agency.

This appears to be follow-through on a 2016 African Union decision.  I sincerely hope it will not be a do-nothing supranational bureaucracy.
South Africa has its own space agency, the South African National Space Agency (SANSA), in case anyone's aware. South Africa worked on its own SLVs, the RSA-3 and RSA-4 (both derived from the Jericho missile), during the last years of the apartheid regime in South Africa, but the RSA-3 only got as far as three suborbital launches. Someday the SANSA could revive the RSA-3/4 in a much more modernized form with indigenous tracking systems and up-to-date rocket engine technology.

South Africa also had a nuclear weapons program that produced 6 operational warheads, which were dismantled before the 1994 democratic elections. Since then there has been a monumental brain drain as former experts retired and their replacements left the country. Today South Africa produces about half the electricity it generated in 1994, and suffers from ongoing, crippling rolling power blackouts to prevent a total grid collapse.

Point being, South Africa’s rocket program is about as likely to be revived as its former nuclear program - which means zero chance of it happening in the next 30 years, if ever.
South Africa will surely revive its space program, but the country is planning to increasing rely on renewable energy for electricity needs in the future and in no way is going to revive a nuclear program. Despite having developed nuclear weapons in the 1980s, South Africa did not have any real geopolitical rivals in southern Africa.


There’s a lot more to it than that. The rocket program was directly linked to developing a delivery capability for their nuclear warheads.

The world (and South Africa) has radically changed since then and South Africa now has none of the rocket expertise left that it had in the late eighties and early nineties.

While its space program may be revived in some fashion, this will not include a rocket program. At best it will involve buying launch slots from international launch providers for small locally manufactured satellites.

You won’t see a locally developed orbital rocket launch from South Africa in the next 50 years.
« Last Edit: 02/05/2023 02:03 am by M.E.T. »

Offline Vahe231991

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Re: African Space Agency (AfSA)
« Reply #7 on: 02/06/2023 07:45 pm »
Will Africa develop an orbital launcher in this decade?

And will it launch its first probe to a celestial body in this decade?

https://africanews.space/african-union-executive-council-approves-african-space-agency-structure/ [dated Oct 21, 2021]

Unfortunately, neither of your questions are addressed in the article.

Quote
Domiciled in Egypt, the structure of AfSA would facilitate the human resources needed for the operationalization of the Agency. The agency is expected to commence operations in 2022 after the appointment of the leadership and workforce of the agency.

This appears to be follow-through on a 2016 African Union decision.  I sincerely hope it will not be a do-nothing supranational bureaucracy.
South Africa has its own space agency, the South African National Space Agency (SANSA), in case anyone's aware. South Africa worked on its own SLVs, the RSA-3 and RSA-4 (both derived from the Jericho missile), during the last years of the apartheid regime in South Africa, but the RSA-3 only got as far as three suborbital launches. Someday the SANSA could revive the RSA-3/4 in a much more modernized form with indigenous tracking systems and up-to-date rocket engine technology.

South Africa also had a nuclear weapons program that produced 6 operational warheads, which were dismantled before the 1994 democratic elections. Since then there has been a monumental brain drain as former experts retired and their replacements left the country. Today South Africa produces about half the electricity it generated in 1994, and suffers from ongoing, crippling rolling power blackouts to prevent a total grid collapse.

Point being, South Africa’s rocket program is about as likely to be revived as its former nuclear program - which means zero chance of it happening in the next 30 years, if ever.
South Africa will surely revive its space program, but the country is planning to increasing rely on renewable energy for electricity needs in the future and in no way is going to revive a nuclear program. Despite having developed nuclear weapons in the 1980s, South Africa did not have any real geopolitical rivals in southern Africa.


There’s a lot more to it than that. The rocket program was directly linked to developing a delivery capability for their nuclear warheads.

The world (and South Africa) has radically changed since then and South Africa now has none of the rocket expertise left that it had in the late eighties and early nineties.

While its space program may be revived in some fashion, this will not include a rocket program. At best it will involve buying launch slots from international launch providers for small locally manufactured satellites.

You won’t see a locally developed orbital rocket launch from South Africa in the next 50 years.
South Africa has its own space program, SANSA (South African National Space Agency), and in 2011 the Marcom company responsible for design of the Cheetah SLV began development and tests of the rocket engines planned for the Cheetah.

Link:
https://www.sansa.org.za/
https://www.defenceweb.co.za/aerospace/aerospace-aerospace/marcom-developing-south-african-rocket-engine/

Offline M.E.T.

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Re: African Space Agency (AfSA)
« Reply #8 on: 02/07/2023 06:15 am »
Will Africa develop an orbital launcher in this decade?

And will it launch its first probe to a celestial body in this decade?

https://africanews.space/african-union-executive-council-approves-african-space-agency-structure/ [dated Oct 21, 2021]

Unfortunately, neither of your questions are addressed in the article.

Quote
Domiciled in Egypt, the structure of AfSA would facilitate the human resources needed for the operationalization of the Agency. The agency is expected to commence operations in 2022 after the appointment of the leadership and workforce of the agency.

This appears to be follow-through on a 2016 African Union decision.  I sincerely hope it will not be a do-nothing supranational bureaucracy.
South Africa has its own space agency, the South African National Space Agency (SANSA), in case anyone's aware. South Africa worked on its own SLVs, the RSA-3 and RSA-4 (both derived from the Jericho missile), during the last years of the apartheid regime in South Africa, but the RSA-3 only got as far as three suborbital launches. Someday the SANSA could revive the RSA-3/4 in a much more modernized form with indigenous tracking systems and up-to-date rocket engine technology.

South Africa also had a nuclear weapons program that produced 6 operational warheads, which were dismantled before the 1994 democratic elections. Since then there has been a monumental brain drain as former experts retired and their replacements left the country. Today South Africa produces about half the electricity it generated in 1994, and suffers from ongoing, crippling rolling power blackouts to prevent a total grid collapse.

Point being, South Africa’s rocket program is about as likely to be revived as its former nuclear program - which means zero chance of it happening in the next 30 years, if ever.
South Africa will surely revive its space program, but the country is planning to increasing rely on renewable energy for electricity needs in the future and in no way is going to revive a nuclear program. Despite having developed nuclear weapons in the 1980s, South Africa did not have any real geopolitical rivals in southern Africa.


There’s a lot more to it than that. The rocket program was directly linked to developing a delivery capability for their nuclear warheads.

The world (and South Africa) has radically changed since then and South Africa now has none of the rocket expertise left that it had in the late eighties and early nineties.

While its space program may be revived in some fashion, this will not include a rocket program. At best it will involve buying launch slots from international launch providers for small locally manufactured satellites.

You won’t see a locally developed orbital rocket launch from South Africa in the next 50 years.
South Africa has its own space program, SANSA (South African National Space Agency), and in 2011 the Marcom company responsible for design of the Cheetah SLV began development and tests of the rocket engines planned for the Cheetah.

Link:
https://www.sansa.org.za/
https://www.defenceweb.co.za/aerospace/aerospace-aerospace/marcom-developing-south-african-rocket-engine/

I stand by my prediction.

 

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