Author Topic: Rocket planes - models  (Read 1217 times)

Offline ngc3314

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Rocket planes - models
« on: 02/20/2016 08:31 pm »
I recently finished this 1/72 Maquette kit of the Bereznyak-Isayev BI-1, one of the trio of point-defense rocket interceptors developed in the USSR in World War II (projects from which many of the pioneers of Soviet space flight emerged - thats the tenuous relevance to the forum!). Of the three, the BI-1 was tiny. In this scale, it's only 85mm long, and took a lot of tweezers and toothpicks. The kit is unusually detailed (there is a control stick, rudder pedals, and dials on the control panel), and takes some chopping to get to each of the three prototype variants detailed in the instructions. For comparison, the second picture shows much earlier builds of the MiG I-270 (silver) and the I-302P, to the same scale. Maybe they need an Me-163 for comparison.

I learned about the three Soviet projects only while doing background reading for an article on the uneven history of spaceplanes, Twists and turns everywhere.

Offline Vahe231991

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Re: Rocket planes - models
« Reply #1 on: 06/24/2022 02:55 am »
I recently finished this 1/72 Maquette kit of the Bereznyak-Isayev BI-1, one of the trio of point-defense rocket interceptors developed in the USSR in World War II (projects from which many of the pioneers of Soviet space flight emerged - thats the tenuous relevance to the forum!). Of the three, the BI-1 was tiny. In this scale, it's only 85mm long, and took a lot of tweezers and toothpicks. The kit is unusually detailed (there is a control stick, rudder pedals, and dials on the control panel), and takes some chopping to get to each of the three prototype variants detailed in the instructions. For comparison, the second picture shows much earlier builds of the MiG I-270 (silver) and the I-302P, to the same scale. Maybe they need an Me-163 for comparison.

I learned about the three Soviet projects only while doing background reading for an article on the uneven history of spaceplanes, Twists and turns everywhere.
The BI and I-302P used homegrown aircraft design philosophy and rocket engine technology, whereas the Mikoyan-Gurevich I-270 partly owed its heritage to the wartime Messerschmitt Me 263 (aka Junkers Ju 248) rocket-powered interceptor (itself an advanced derivative of the Me 163) because many documents pertaining to the Me 263 fell into Soviet hands after the Red Army in July 1945 took control of the Junkers factory in Dessau, which had been overrun by American GIs in April 1945. The I-270 definitely looks like a cross between the Me 263 and the Soviet Union's wartime rocket fighter designs, combining the ram air turbine, fuselage, and tricycle landing gear of the Me 263 with the straight wings of the BI.

The RP-218 spaceplane design by Sergei Korolev probably partly influenced design of the BI and I-302P because it had straight wings (at the time, Soviet aeronautical engineers mostly had no idea that a suborbital spaceplane needs swept or blunt wings to delay the buildup of air in front of the wings near the transonic region). It would have been carried to high altitudes by a heavy bomber (e.g. Pe-8) and released at an altitude of over 25,000 feet, after which it would reach more than 160,000 feet at a speed of Mach 2.

Link:
http://ram-home.com/ram-old/rp-218.html

Tags: bi-1 i-270 rp-218 
 

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