Author Topic: The future of the AJ10  (Read 17951 times)

Offline MATTBLAK

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Re: The future of the AJ10
« Reply #20 on: 05/17/2021 12:02 pm »
The Orion spacecraft that was first launched on December 5, 2014, relies on the AJ10 for primary propulsion. Therefore, the AJ10 is still in use even though the Delta II that used an AJ10 as the rocket motor for the second stage was retired in 2018.


No, it had no active service module and hence no AJ10
I know, right?! People making authoritative statements such as that the 2014 flight's Service Module had an engine - such a thing would be easy to look up and confirm.
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Online Vahe231991

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Re: The future of the AJ10
« Reply #21 on: 02/04/2022 02:14 am »
The Orion spacecraft that was first launched on December 5, 2014, relies on the AJ10 for primary propulsion. Therefore, the AJ10 is still in use even though the Delta II that used an AJ10 as the rocket motor for the second stage was retired in 2018.


No, it had no active service module and hence no AJ10
I know, right?! People making authoritative statements such as that the 2014 flight's Service Module had an engine - such a thing would be easy to look up and confirm.
As explained here, the Orion's service module is powered by one AJ10-190 engine, which generates 5,778 pounds of thrust.

Offline Skyrocket

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Re: The future of the AJ10
« Reply #22 on: 02/04/2022 06:25 am »
The Orion spacecraft that was first launched on December 5, 2014, relies on the AJ10 for primary propulsion. Therefore, the AJ10 is still in use even though the Delta II that used an AJ10 as the rocket motor for the second stage was retired in 2018.


No, it had no active service module and hence no AJ10
I know, right?! People making authoritative statements such as that the 2014 flight's Service Module had an engine - such a thing would be easy to look up and confirm.
As explained here, the Orion's service module is powered by one AJ10-190 engine, which generates 5,778 pounds of thrust.

Here is a photo showing the Artemis-1 Orion spacecraft with the AJ10-90 engine. It is the first Orion capsule with this engine.
The Orion EFT-1 flight did not have a service module, hence no AJ10 engine

Offline Jim

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Re: The future of the AJ10
« Reply #23 on: 02/04/2022 03:03 pm »
As explained here, the Orion's service module is powered by one AJ10-190 engine, which generates 5,778 pounds of thrust.

There was no active service module or AJ10 on EFT-1.

Look at the date of the article you linked

« Last Edit: 02/04/2022 03:05 pm by Jim »

Online Vahe231991

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Re: The future of the AJ10
« Reply #24 on: 02/04/2022 03:29 pm »
As explained here, the Orion's service module is powered by one AJ10-190 engine, which generates 5,778 pounds of thrust.

There was no active service module or AJ10 on EFT-1.

Look at the date of the article you linked
This article doesn't mention the EFT-1 mission, it only emphasizes that the Orion space modules being earmarked for the Artemis missions have been or are being fitted with the AJ10.

Online DanClemmensen

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Re: The future of the AJ10
« Reply #25 on: 02/04/2022 03:33 pm »
As explained here, the Orion's service module is powered by one AJ10-190 engine, which generates 5,778 pounds of thrust.

There was no active service module or AJ10 on EFT-1.

Look at the date of the article you linked
This article doesn't mention the EFT-1 mission, it only emphasizes that the Orion space modules being earmarked for the Artemis missions have been or are being fitted with the AJ10.
Please read the Wikipedia article for an overview, and then read that article's references. EFT-1 did not have a real service module.
   https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Exploration_Flight_Test-1
Also, don't argue with Jim. He was there. You were not.

Offline jbenton

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Re: The future of the AJ10
« Reply #26 on: 02/04/2022 03:58 pm »
As explained here, the Orion's service module is powered by one AJ10-190 engine, which generates 5,778 pounds of thrust.

There was no active service module or AJ10 on EFT-1.

Look at the date of the article you linked
This article doesn't mention the EFT-1 mission, it only emphasizes that the Orion space modules being earmarked for the Artemis missions have been or are being fitted with the AJ10.

Though you're right that the Orion CSM will use AJ10, they're mentioning EFT-1 because you described it as "the Orion spacecraft's first flight."

The Orion spacecraft that was first launched on December 5, 2014, relies on the AJ10 for primary propulsion. Therefore, the AJ10 is still in use even though the Delta II that used an AJ10 as the rocket motor for the second stage was retired in 2018.

Link:
https://newatlas.com/nasa-test-fire-service-module-engine/60944/
https://space.skyrocket.de/doc_sdat/orion-mpcv.htm
Emphasis mine.

That flight only had the capsule with no service module. Artemis 1 will be the first launch with the whole CSM stack, including the AJ10. The articles you linked say that Orion will use AJ10 in flight they do not say that it was used on EFT-1. I don't think that you're asserting that it was used in EFT-1, but the way you phrased it, you seemed to imply that it was used in EFT-1.
« Last Edit: 02/04/2022 03:59 pm by jbenton »

Offline edkyle99

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Re: The future of the AJ10
« Reply #27 on: 02/04/2022 04:24 pm »
Aren't the Orion AJ10 engines repurposed from Shuttle orbiters?  There are a limited number available I suspect.

 - Ed Kyle
« Last Edit: 02/04/2022 04:24 pm by edkyle99 »

Offline Jim

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Re: The future of the AJ10
« Reply #28 on: 02/04/2022 04:34 pm »
As explained here, the Orion's service module is powered by one AJ10-190 engine, which generates 5,778 pounds of thrust.

There was no active service module or AJ10 on EFT-1.

Look at the date of the article you linked
This article doesn't mention the EFT-1 mission, it only emphasizes that the Orion space modules being earmarked for the Artemis missions have been or are being fitted with the AJ10.

It doesn't have to mention EFT-1.  Look at the title of the article "ORIONíS EUROPEAN SERVICE MODULE MAKES ITS DEBUT AT KENNEDY SPACE CENTER"  It means the first one. 

Offline Jim

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Re: The future of the AJ10
« Reply #29 on: 02/04/2022 04:37 pm »
The Orion spacecraft that was first launched on December 5, 2014, relies on the AJ10 for primary propulsion.


This specific sentence is wrong or at the least misleading. 

The Orion spacecraft that was launched on December 5, 2014 did not rely on the AJ10 for primary propulsion.

Offline tadaniels

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Re: The future of the AJ10
« Reply #30 on: 02/04/2022 04:38 pm »
Aren't the Orion AJ10 engines repurposed from Shuttle orbiters?  There are a limited number available I suspect.

 - Ed Kyle

My understanding is that they are re-purposed STS OMS engines.

Offline Hog

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Re: The future of the AJ10
« Reply #31 on: 02/09/2022 07:06 pm »
Aren't the Orion AJ10 engines repurposed from Shuttle orbiters?  There are a limited number available I suspect.

 - Ed Kyle

My understanding is that they are re-purposed STS OMS engines.
They are, and NASA put out an RFI back in 2019 for new ones.
https://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=45002.0
Paul

Online Vahe231991

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Re: The future of the AJ10
« Reply #32 on: 02/09/2022 08:56 pm »
Are there any photos of the AJ10 engines being incorporated into Orion space capsule earmarked for the Artemis II mission, since the space capsule for the Artemis III mission is still under construction?

Offline Kaputnik

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Re: The future of the AJ10
« Reply #33 on: 02/10/2022 07:46 pm »
So are new AJ10s available?
If not, what is the current stock of ex-Shuttle engines?

Anybody else here old enough to remember the original methalox design for Orion... *sigh*...
"I don't care what anything was DESIGNED to do, I care about what it CAN do"- Gene Kranz

Offline russianhalo117

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Re: The future of the AJ10
« Reply #34 on: 02/10/2022 08:01 pm »
So are new AJ10s available?
If not, what is the current stock of ex-Shuttle engines?

Anybody else here old enough to remember the original methalox design for Orion... *sigh*...
The AJ10 production modernization and restart programme is underway. A new modernized and additively manufactured version is in development to replace all legacy AJ10 versions and variants. Also AJ10 is undergoing an incremental upgrades testing programme like RS-25.

Offline Hog

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Re: The future of the AJ10
« Reply #35 on: 02/10/2022 09:36 pm »
So are new AJ10s available?
If not, what is the current stock of ex-Shuttle engines?

Anybody else here old enough to remember the original methalox design for Orion... *sigh*...
There was an article that detailed all the specifics, I looked but couldn't find it.  It was dated from when one was hotfired.
Paul

Offline hektor

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Re: The future of the AJ10
« Reply #36 on: 02/10/2022 10:02 pm »
Are there any photos of the AJ10 engines being incorporated into Orion space capsule earmarked for the Artemis II mission, since the space capsule for the Artemis III mission is still under construction?

There is only one engine per Orion. The engine was already installed - in the case of Artemis II - on the second European Service Module which was delivered to KSC a few month ago. Likewise for Artemis III an AJ10 has been shipped or should be shipped to Germany for the same purpose. Ditto for Artemis IV, etc.

Airbus readies the no. 2 European Service Module for its crewed mission to the Moon
« Last Edit: 02/10/2022 10:04 pm by hektor »

Online Vahe231991

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Re: The future of the AJ10
« Reply #37 on: 11/17/2022 03:17 am »
In the wake of the success of the first launch of the SLS, once the Orion spacecraft being used in the Artemis 1 mission approaches lunar orbit we should expect images to be released of Orion CM-002 firing the AJ10 engine to the lunar orbit insertion.

Offline russianhalo117

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Re: The future of the AJ10
« Reply #38 on: 11/17/2022 02:22 pm »
In the wake of the success of the first launch of the SLS, once the Orion spacecraft being used in the Artemis 1 mission approaches lunar orbit we should expect images to be released of Orion CM-002 firing the AJ10 engine to the lunar orbit insertion.
AFAIU it is going to a distant retrograde orbit.

Online DanClemmensen

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Re: The future of the AJ10
« Reply #39 on: 11/17/2022 02:35 pm »
In the wake of the success of the first launch of the SLS, once the Orion spacecraft being used in the Artemis 1 mission approaches lunar orbit we should expect images to be released of Orion CM-002 firing the AJ10 engine to the lunar orbit insertion.
AFAIU it is going to a distant retrograde orbit.
Yes, but"distant retrograde orbit" does not convey the true strangeness of this trajectory at all. The spacecraft has two close encounters with the Moon, one when entering this orbit and one as it is leaving. The trajectory between these events is a wondrous pair of loops around the moon that do not look like ellipses at all. There is an animation at:
  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Artemis_1

Tags: aj10 Orion SLS 
 

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