Author Topic: Mars EDL technologies  (Read 162796 times)

Offline catdlr

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Re: Mars EDL technologies
« Reply #240 on: 04/03/2014 08:25 pm »
Media Invited to View NASA Cutting-edge Landing Technology Before Test Flight

April 3, 2014
RELEASE
Media Invited to View NASA Cutting-edge Landing Technology Before Test Flight

NASA's Low-Density Supersonic Decelerator (LDSD) project will be flying a rocket-powered, saucer-shaped test vehicle into near-space this June from the U.S. Navy's Pacific Missile Range Facility on Kauai, Hawaii.

Media are invited to NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) on Wednesday, April 9, for a brief mission overview and visit to the clean room where this near-space experimental test vehicle is being prepared for shipment to Hawaii. The mission overview and tour will take place from 10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. PDT at JPL, located at 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, Calif., off the Berkshire/ Oak Grove off-ramp of the 210 Freeway.

The LDSD crosscutting demonstration mission will test breakthrough technologies that will enable large payloads to be safely landed on the surface of Mars, or other planetary bodies with atmospheres, including Earth. The technologies will not only enable landing of larger payloads on Mars, but also allow access to much more of the planet's surface by enabling landings at higher altitude sites.

Interview opportunities for members of the LDSD team will be offered after both the briefing on the project in JPL's von Karman auditorium and in the "High Bay 2" clean room where the saucer-shaped craft currently resides.
Journalists who would like to attend the event must arrange access in advance by emailing JPL Media Relations' Elena Mejia at [email protected] by 11 a.m. PDT Tuesday, April 8. Valid media credentials are required. Non-U.S. citizens also must bring a valid passport. Detailed instructions will be given to media who RSVP about the options for entering the clean room or viewing from a gallery. Media in the clean room must wear flat, closed-toe shoes and long pants and will be required to don special outerwear and have any recording equipment cleaned.

More information about the LDSD space technology demonstration mission is online at:
http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/tdm/ldsd/

For a diagram of the proposed test, see page three right column from this document:

http://www.nasa.gov/pdf/737628main_Final_LDSD_Fact_Sheet_3-26-13.pdf
« Last Edit: 04/03/2014 08:41 pm by catdlr »
Tony De La Rosa

Offline Kaputnik

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Re: Mars EDL technologies
« Reply #241 on: 04/03/2014 09:38 pm »
A question: are these inflatable decelerators compatible with lifting/guided entry, or must they be symmetrically loaded?
"I don't care what anything was DESIGNED to do, I care about what it CAN do"- Gene Kranz

Offline catdlr

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Re: Mars EDL technologies
« Reply #242 on: 04/11/2014 03:31 am »
an explanation to the video posted above.

LDSD: We Brake for Mars

Published on Apr 9, 2014
NASA tests a supersonic parachute under Mars-like conditions for future exploration.


Tony De La Rosa

Offline catdlr

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Re: Mars EDL technologies
« Reply #243 on: 04/11/2014 03:42 am »
NASA wants to land something big on Mars: Will a flying saucer help?

http://www.latimes.com/science/sciencenow/la-sci-sn-nasa-ldsd-flying-saucer-20140409,0,2628305.story

Quote
In a few days, the agency will move the vehicle from the clean room at JPL where it is being built to the Navy's Pacific Missile Range Facility in Hawaii. There, in the first week of June, it will be carried to an altitude of 120,000 feet by a giant balloon. Then rockets on the vehicle will take over, pushing it to an altitude of 180,000 feet and helping to reach supersonic speeds. The thin atmosphere at this altitude is similar to the thin atmosphere on Mars.

photo credit: Mel Melcon / Los Angeles Times
Tony De La Rosa

Offline vulture4

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Re: Mars EDL technologies
« Reply #244 on: 04/17/2014 09:37 pm »
Armadillo used an inflatable decellerator on the STIG; it seems to have worked pretty well.

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Re: Mars EDL technologies
« Reply #245 on: 04/26/2014 10:25 pm »
I'm wondering if there is anything more extensive on this. I'm only finding a 2-page fact sheet and some videos:




Offline ClaytonBirchenough

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Re: Mars EDL technologies
« Reply #246 on: 04/29/2014 09:48 pm »
Armadillo used an inflatable decellerator on the STIG; it seems to have worked pretty well.

I'm having trouble finding any information on this... is there a PDF or anything floating around out there on Armadillo's inflatable decellerator?
Clayton Birchenough
Astro. Engineer and Computational Mathematics @ ERAU

Offline rdiaz

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Re: Mars EDL technologies
« Reply #247 on: 05/02/2014 02:51 am »
I'm wondering if there is anything more extensive on this. I'm only finding a 2-page fact sheet and some videos:


Starting at 15:10 http://www.nasa.gov/sites/default/files/ne0801_tdm-2_0.mp4.
Also, an older presentation by Mark Adler https://solarsystem.nasa.gov/docs/Adler_SIAD.pdf.

Offline rdiaz

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Re: Mars EDL technologies
« Reply #248 on: 05/02/2014 02:59 am »
Armadillo used an inflatable decellerator on the STIG; it seems to have worked pretty well.

I'm having trouble finding any information on this... is there a PDF or anything floating around out there on Armadillo's inflatable decellerator?

Some images, commendable effort but I wouldn't say that it worked "pretty well"
http://highpowerrocketry.blogspot.com/2012/02/stiga-flight-2-to-95km-by-armadillo.html

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Re: Mars EDL technologies
« Reply #249 on: 05/03/2014 07:24 pm »

Offline catdlr

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Re: Mars EDL technologies
« Reply #250 on: 05/16/2014 12:22 am »
NASA Briefing for Supersonic Saucer-Shaped Vehicle

May 15, 2014

A mission overview briefing about NASA's upcoming flight test of the Low-Density Supersonic Decelerator (LDSD) experiment will be provided to reporters attending a media day on Monday, June 2, at the U.S. Navy's Pacific Missile Range Facility (PMRF) on Kauai, Hawaii. The public can watch the briefing via live streaming, at 11 a.m. PDT (2 p.m. EDT/8 a.m. HST).

NASA's LDSD test is designed to investigate breakthrough technologies that will benefit landing future human and robotic Mars missions, as well as aid in safely returning large payloads to Earth. The NASA LDSD test over the Pacific Ocean will simulate the entry, descent and landing speeds a spacecraft would be exposed to when flying through the Martian atmosphere. During the test, a large saucer-shaped disk carrying an inflatable inner-tube-shaped decelerator and parachute system will be carried to an altitude of 120,000 feet (37 kilometers) by a giant balloon. After release from the balloon, rockets will lift the disk to 180,000 feet (55 kilometers) while reaching supersonic speeds. Traveling at 3.5 times the speed of sound, the saucer's decelerator will inflate, slowing the vehicle, and then a parachute will deploy to carry it to the ocean's surface.

Briefing participants will include:

-- Capt. Bruce Hay USN, commanding officer, Pacific Missile Range Facility, Kauai, Hawaii

-- Michael Gazarik, associate administrator of the Space Technology Mission Directorate, NASA Headquarters, Washington

-- Mark Adler, LDSD project manager, NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California

-- Ian Clark, LDSD principal investigator, JPL

The briefing will be streamed live on the agency's website at:

http://www.nasa.gov/nasatv

It will also be carried live on:

http://www.ustream.tv/nasajpl2

NASA has six potential dates for launch of the high-altitude balloon carrying the LDSD experiment: June 3, 5, 7, 9, 11 and 13. The launch window for each date extends from 7 a.m. to 8:30 a.m. HST.

NASA's LDSD carries several onboard cameras. It is expected that video of selected portions of the test, including the rocket-powered ascent, will be downlinked and streamed live to several NASA websites, including:

http://www.nasa.gov/nasatv

and

http://www.ustream.tv/nasajpl2

Decisions to attempt launch of the LDSD test will be made the day before each launch opportunity date. NASA will issue launch advisories via social media -- @NASA_Technology and @NASA - as well as the mission website and news media advisories.

For more information about NASA's LDSD, visit the mission page at:

http://go.usa.gov/kzZQ

NASA's LDSD program is part of the agency's Space Technology Mission Directorate, which is innovating, developing, testing and flying hardware for use in NASA's future missions. For more information about NASA's investment in space technology, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/spacetech

Tony De La Rosa

Offline RanulfC

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Re: Mars EDL technologies
« Reply #251 on: 05/16/2014 01:04 pm »
I am seriously begining to believe that NASA is going out of their way to "tweek" the UFO believers :)

Besides we ALL know THIS is what a real "Saucer-Shaped" reentry vehicle looks like:
http://www.military.com/Content/MoreContent/?file=PMsaucer
http://www.fantastic-plastic.com/LRVCatalogPage.htm

Randy
From The Amazing Catstronaut on the Black Arrow LV:
British physics, old chap. It's undignified to belch flames and effluvia all over the pad, what. A true gentlemen's orbital conveyance lifts itself into the air unostentatiously, with the minimum of spectacle and a modicum of grace. Not like our American cousins' launch vehicles, eh?

Offline catdlr

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Re: Mars EDL technologies
« Reply #252 on: 05/18/2014 05:29 am »
NASA June 2 Kauai Media Day for First Supersonic Saucer-Shaped Vehicle Test

http://www.nasa.gov/press/2014/may/nasa-june-2-kauai-media-day-for-first-supersonic-saucer-shaped-vehicle-test/

Quote
During the test a large saucer-shaped disk carrying an inflatable inner tube-shaped decelerator and parachute system will be carried to an altitude of 120,000 feet by a giant balloon. After release from the balloon, rockets will lift the disk to 180,000 feet while reaching supersonic speeds. Traveling at 3.5 times the speed of sound, the saucer's decelerator will inflate, slowing the vehicle down, and then a parachute will deploy to carry it to the ocean's surface.
Tony De La Rosa

Offline AnalogMan

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Re: Mars EDL technologies
« Reply #253 on: 05/22/2014 12:59 am »
NASA's Saucer-Shaped Craft Preps for Flight Test
May 16, 2014

NASA's Low-Density Supersonic Decelerator (LDSD) project, a rocket-powered, saucer-shaped test vehicle, has completed final assembly at the U.S. Navy's Pacific Missile Range Facility in Kauai, Hawaii.

This experimental flight test is designed to investigate breakthrough technologies that will benefit future Mars missions, including those involving human exploration. Three weeks of testing, simulations and rehearsals are planned before the first launch opportunity on the morning of June 3. LDSD was built at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, and shipped to Kauai for final assembly and preparations.

"Our Supersonic Flight Dynamics Test Vehicle number 1 arrived at the Navy's Pacific Missile Range Facility on April 17," said Mark Adler, project manager of the Low Density Supersonic Decelerator project from JPL. "Since then, we have been preparing it for flight. One of the last big assemblies occurred on April 30, when we mated the vehicle with its Star-48 booster rocket."

During the June experimental flight test, a balloon will carry the test vehicle from the Hawaii Navy facility to an altitude of about 120,000 feet. There, it will be dropped and its booster rocket will quickly kick in and carry it to 180,000 feet, accelerating to Mach 4. Once in the very rarified air high above the Pacific, the saucer will begin a series of automated tests of two breakthrough technologies.

In order to get larger payloads to Mars, and to pave the way for future human explorers, cutting-edge technologies like LDSD are critical. Among other applications, this new space technology will enable delivery of the supplies and materials needed for long-duration missions to the Red Planet.

The upper layers of Earth’s stratosphere are the most similar environment available to match the properties of the thin atmosphere of Mars. The Low Density Supersonic Decelerator mission developed this test method to ensure the best prospects for effective testing of the new and improved technologies here on Earth.

Anyone with Internet access will be able to watch live as video from the June test is relayed from the vehicle to the ground. The low-resolution images from the saucer are expected to show the vehicle dropping away from its high-altitude balloon mothership and then rocketing up to the very edge of the stratosphere. The test vehicle will then deploy an inflatable Kevlar tube around itself, called the Supersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator (SIAD). After the SIAD inflates, the test vehicle will deploy a mammoth parachute called the Supersonic Disk Sail Parachute.

While people watching at home may be fascinated by how these two new technologies operate, the NASA flight team will actually be concentrating on a more fundamental question – "Will the test vehicle work as planned?"

"This first test is a true experimental flight test," said Ian Clark, the LDSD principal investigator from JPL. "Our goal is to get this first-of-its-kind test vehicle to operate correctly at very high speeds and very high altitudes. "

Although there is no guarantee that this first test will be successful, regardless of the outcome, the LDSD team expects to learn a great deal from the test. NASA has two more saucer-shaped test vehicles in the pipeline, with plans to test them from Hawaii in summer of 2015.

"We are pushing the envelope on what we know," said Clark. "We are accepting higher risk with these test flights than we would with a space mission, such as the Mars Science Laboratory. We will learn a great deal even if these tests, conducted here in Earth's atmosphere at relatively low cost, fail to meet some of the mission objectives."

As NASA plans increasingly ambitious robotic missions to Mars, laying the groundwork for even more complex human science expeditions to come, the spacecraft needed to land safely on the Red Planet's surface will become larger and heavier. This new technology will enable those important missions.

More information about LDSD is at: http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/tdm/ldsd/

http://www.nasa.gov/jpl/ldsd/flight-test-20140516

Photo Captions:

Top: Preparing for a Supersonic Test

A saucer-shaped test vehicle holding equipment for landing large payloads on Mars is shown in the Missile Assembly Building at the US Navy's Pacific Missile Range Facility in Kaua‘i, Hawaii.  The vehicle, part of the Low Density Supersonic Decelerator project, will test an inflatable decelerator and a parachute at high altitudes and speeds over the Pacific Missile Range this June.  A balloon will lift the vehicle to high altitudes, where a rocket will take it even higher to the top of the stratosphere at several times the speed of sound.

This image was taken during a "hang-angle" measurement, in which engineers set the vehicle's rocket motor to the appropriate angle for the high-altitude test. The nozzle and the lower half of the Star-48 solid rocket motor are the dark objects seen in the middle of the image below the saucer.

Middle: Hanging Saucer

In this picture, NASA’s saucer-shaped experimental flight vehicle is prepared for a Range Compatibility Test at the US Navy’s Pacific Missile Range Facility in Kaua‘i, Hawaii.  During the exercise, which occurred on April 23, 2014, all the radio frequencies interfaces between the vehicle, its balloon carrier and the missile range were checked. 

Bottom: Prepping the Parachute Deployment Device

An engineer works on the Parachute Deployment Device of the Low Density Supersonic Decelerator test vehicle in this image taken at the Missile Assembly Building at the US Navy's Pacific Missile Range Facility in Kaua‘i, Hawaii. From high altitudes above Earth, the vehicle will test two devices for landing future heavy payloads on Mars. One of the two devices is a mammoth parachute called the Supersonic Disk Sail Parachute.

That parachute will be released with the help of the Parachute Deployment Device, the can with barber-like stripes seen at the center of the picture. Inside is a 14.4-foot (4.4-meter) ballute, which is a cross between a balloon and a parachute. Once the test vehicle is at the right altitude, the ballute will be shot out of the can by a gunpowder mortar, after which the drag on the ballute is used to pull out the big parachute from a separate compartment.

All Images Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech
« Last Edit: 05/22/2014 01:07 am by AnalogMan »

Offline AnalogMan

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Re: Mars EDL technologies
« Reply #254 on: 05/22/2014 01:09 am »
Before the Drop: Engineers Ready Supersonic Decelerator
May 21, 2014

A saucer-shaped vehicle designed to test interplanetary landing devices hangs on a tower in preparation for launch at the U.S. Navy's Pacific Missile Range Facility in Kauai, Hawaii. The saucer, which is part of NASA's Low-Density Supersonic Decelerator (LDSD) project, will test two devices for landing heavy payloads on Mars: an inflatable tube and an enormous parachute.

The launch tower helps link the vehicle to a balloon; once the balloon floats up, the vehicle is released from the tower and the balloon carries it to high altitudes. The vehicle's rocket takes it to even higher altitudes, to the top of the stratosphere, where the supersonic test begins.

NASA has six potential dates for launch of the high-altitude balloon carrying the LDSD experiment: June 3, 5, 7, 9, 11 and 14. The launch window for each date extends from 7 to 8:30 a.m. HST (10 to 11:30 a.m. PDT and 1 to 2:30 p.m. EDT).

This image was taken during the vehicle's Integrated System Test, an operations rehearsal that engaged all of the teams and systems required for launch and flight, and ran through activities that will be conducted before and during launch, ascent, powered drop and flight.

http://www.nasa.gov/jpl/ldsd/supersonic-decelerator-20140521

Photo Caption:

The launch tower helps link the Low-Density Supersonic Decelerator test vehicle to a balloon; once the balloon floats up, the vehicle is released from the tower and the balloon carries it to high altitudes. The vehicle's rocket will take it to even higher altitudes, where the supersonic test begins.
Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

Offline catdlr

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Re: Mars EDL technologies
« Reply #255 on: 05/22/2014 01:54 am »
LDSD: We Brake for Mars: Part 2

 Published on May 21, 2014

In part 2, JPL engineer Mike Meacham explains how an inflatable decelerator will help larger spacecraft land on Mars. The device will be tested at the Pacific Missile Range Facility in Hawaii in June, 2014.


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Offline Kaputnik

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Re: Mars EDL technologies
« Reply #256 on: 05/22/2014 08:51 am »
What sort of g forces would a SIAD device produce? Seeing as they mention manned payloads...
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Re: Mars EDL technologies
« Reply #257 on: 05/23/2014 08:44 pm »
Why does the SIAD have to inflate post entry-interface as opposed to before? Would it allow more margin? (on increased area, or reduced pressure inside the inflatable shield, and therefore reduced mass) if the requirement to inflate after the onset of appreciable drag was dropped?

Offline guru

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Re: Mars EDL technologies
« Reply #258 on: 05/27/2014 01:46 pm »
Why does the SIAD have to inflate post entry-interface as opposed to before? Would it allow more margin? (on increased area, or reduced pressure inside the inflatable shield, and therefore reduced mass) if the requirement to inflate after the onset of appreciable drag was dropped?

I believe peak g-loading on a traditional EDL sequence (somewhere between 12 and 16 g forces for the MSL for example) occurs prior to the time when the SIAD would be inflated.  Thus, with a greater surface area creating higher drag, if the SIAD were to be inflated prior to entry interface, the peak g-load, as well as the peak heating flux, could be even higher.

Offline Jim

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Re: Mars EDL technologies
« Reply #259 on: 05/27/2014 02:12 pm »
Why does the SIAD have to inflate post entry-interface as opposed to before?

It isn't a heat shield.  It is a decelerator that can be used in higher velocity regimes than parachutes.

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