NASASpaceFlight.com Forum

General Discussion => Live Event Section - Latest Space Flight News => Topic started by: jacqmans on 08/04/2006 03:21 pm

Title: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 08/04/2006 03:21 pm
The Balearic Islands are captured in this Envisat image. The Spanish islands of Majorca (the largest), Minorca (far right), Ibiza (top left island) and Formentera (beneath Ibiza) - located in the western Mediterranean Sea near the eastern coast of Spain - form the Autonomous Community of the Balearic Islands. Palma, the capital of Majorca, is also the capital of the Community.
Last month, Spain's eastern seashores were inundated with jellyfish, forcing tourists to stay out of the waters.

Read more at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMSG0JZBQE_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: astrobrian on 08/04/2006 08:49 pm
beautiful shot, and nice resolution too
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 08/11/2006 11:11 am
This Envisat image taken on 9 August 2006 captures some of the fires raging across north-western Spain and Portugal.

More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMMDJY7QQE_index_0.html

Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 08/18/2006 09:57 pm
This Proba image highlights Liberty Island and Ellis Island in the New York Harbour. Liberty State Park is located to the left of Liberty and Ellis, and New Jersey is located at the top left. Manhattan is seen at the top right, and Governor?s Island is seen at the bottom right.

More at:
http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEM0I9JZBQE_index_0.html
 
Title: RE: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 08/25/2006 09:52 pm
The Yellow Sea of China

25 August 2006

The Yellow Sea, bordered by China, North Korea and South Korea, is shown in this Envisat image. Named for the yellowish sand – which originates from the Yellow River – that colours its water, the Yellow Sea is one of the largest shallow areas of continental shelf in the world with an average depth of 44 metres and a maximum depth of 152 metres.

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMAECJZBQE_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 09/01/2006 01:14 pm
Siberia is highlighted in this Envisat image acquired on 7 August 2006. An enormous area in north Asia, Siberia spreads from the Urals in the west to the Okhotsk Sea in the east, from the Arctic Ocean in the north to the borders of Kazakhstan, Mongolia and China in the south.

More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMXY56LARE_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 09/08/2006 10:32 am
Lake Travis, the larger body of water with a serpentine-like course seen in the upper part of this Proba image, is an artificial lake on the Texas Colorado River that winds its way northwest from the City of Austin through Central Texas for some 100 kilometres.

More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEM8253VRRE_index_0.html
 
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 09/15/2006 03:10 pm
New Zealand, shown in this Envisat image, is located in the South Pacific Ocean and is comprised of two major islands - North and South - and a number of smaller islands.

More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEM6TZ7LURE_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: Rocket Ronnie on 09/15/2006 03:11 pm
Anyone seen on of the UK from the Shuttle?
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 09/22/2006 10:14 am
The French Frigate Shoals, highlighted in this Proba image, is an atoll consisting of a 35-kilometre crescent-shaped reef surrounding a dozen small islets located in the Pacific Ocean about 800 kilometres northwest of Honolulu, Hawaii.

More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEM70P8LURE_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 09/29/2006 05:06 pm
Suriname and French Guiana, located on the Atlantic Ocean in northern South America, are featured in this Envisat satellite image, which highlights the Maroni River (the large river seen on the right), the Suriname River (seen on the left) and the Brokopondo Reservoir (the dark blue area).

Read more at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMS5JKKKSE_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 10/10/2006 01:29 pm
The Niau atoll, located in the central South Pacific Ocean, is highlighted in this Proba image. Niau is one of nearly 80 coral reef atolls that forms the Tuamotu Archipelago in French Polynesia. The Tuamotu is the largest chain of atolls in the world, stretching some 2000 kilometres, and has a total land area of 850 square kilometres.
 
More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMMO6LKKSE_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 10/20/2006 11:20 am
The municipality of Uruapan and its surrounding volcanoes in western central Mexico are featured in this Proba image. Uruapan is located in Michoacán State - one of Mexico's 31 constituent states.

More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMUCPOFHTE_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 10/27/2006 11:14 am
The southwestern area of Madagascar ? the fourth largest island in the world ? is highlighted in this Envisat image. The rivers Morondava, Maharivo, Mangoky and Onilahy are shown, respectively, emptying into the Indian Ocean in the Mozambique Channel. The green coloured body of water visible just below the Mangoky River is Lake Ihotry.

More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMUSDPFHTE_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 11/03/2006 12:10 pm
This Envisat image taken on 27 October 2006 captures the fire in southern California that has claimed the lives of five firefighters and forced hundreds of people to evacuate their homes since it began last Thursday.

Full story at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMEKMZBYTE_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 11/10/2006 01:16 pm
This Proba image features France?s oldest city, Marseille. Greek sailors from Asia Minor founded Marseille in 600 BC. When the Romans annexed it in 49 BC, trading posts were set up all along the Mediterranean Sea. The city later developed into a successful commercial port between the 15th and 19th centuries.

More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMVMG0CYTE_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 11/17/2006 10:57 am
This Envisat image features the Bering Land Bridge National Preserve located on the Seward Peninsula in Northwestern Alaska. The preserve protects the remains of a land bridge that once connected the continents of Asia and North America, which are now separated by the Bering Strait.

More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEM9MLUXJUE_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 11/24/2006 11:49 am
The island of San Benedicto is featured in this Proba image. San Benedicto, located 370 km south of the tip of Baja California Peninsula, is the third largest of the four volcanic islands that make up the Revillagigedo Islands, which were discovered in 1533, in the Pacific Ocean.
 
More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMNX9C4VUE_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 12/06/2006 03:23 pm
This Envisat image acquired on 25 November captures smoke spewing from Europe's largest active volcano, Mt. Etna. The 3 350 metre-high volcano resumed eruptions in early September this year and entered its highly active phase on 5 November, according to the National Institute of Geophysics and Volcanic Studies.
 
More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMAUHD4VUE_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 12/08/2006 11:39 am
Monument Valley, an area of freestanding sandstone rock that straddles the borders of northeastern Arizona and southeastern Utah, is featured in this Proba image. Home to the most populous Navajo Indian Nation, Monument Valley is protected as a Navajo Tribal Park.

More at:
http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEM9JD9L6VE_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 12/15/2006 12:03 pm
This Envisat image captures the smoke arising from raging fires burning across the state of Victoria in the southeastern corner of Australia. More than 10 massive blazes have burnt around 420 000 hectares since they began nearly two weeks ago.
 
More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMM1AQJNVE_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 12/22/2006 09:41 am
The snow-capped Antarctic Peninsula and South Shetlands Islands are highlighted in this Envisat image. The tip of the Antarctic Peninsula, seen in the bottom centre, is the northernmost part of Antarctica?s mainland, making it Antarctica?s farthest point from the South Pole.
 
More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEM79RQJNVE_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 01/05/2007 03:09 pm
Numerous smoke plumes from burning fires are shown over southern Sudan in this Envisat image. Although the cause of these fires is unknown, agricultural fires in the region are common this time of year because the dry season begins in November. Deliberate fires are often set to burn out papyrus plants so grass can grow and feed livestock.
 
More at:
http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEM7I0SVYVE_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 01/12/2007 09:09 am
Swains Island, located in the South Pacific Ocean, is highlighted in this Proba image. This small coral atoll is comprised of an outer perimeter (approximately 13 km in circumference) of flat coral reefs and a 2.5 km² ring-shaped landmass surrounding a shallow fresh-water lagoon in the centre that is closed off from the sea.

More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMNZHRMTWE_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 01/19/2007 03:07 pm
Lake Tanganyika, the world's longest freshwater lake, is highlighted in this Envisat image. Located in Central Africa on the borders of Tanzania, the Democratic Republic of Congo, Zambia and Burundi, Lake Tanganyika stretches approximately 676 km long and 50 km wide.

More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEM1YYRMTWE_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 01/26/2007 10:09 am
This Proba image features the sister cities of Sault Sainte Marie, Ontario, and Sault Sainte Marie, Michigan. Both cities are located on St. Mary's River, which links three of North America's Great Lakes - Superior, Huron and Michigan.

More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMAJFSMTWE_index_0.html
Title: RE: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: Joey on 01/27/2007 05:47 am

" ... The Sault Sainte Marie International Bridge (visible as a thin white strip) spans 4,5 km and is the only vehicular crossing between Ontario and Michigan. ..."

Ummm, that's incorrect - the Ambassador Bridge (Detroit MI/Windsor, ON) and the Blue Water Bridge (Port Huron, MI/Point Edward, ON)  - also the Detroit-Windsor Tunnel - are also vehicular crossings between Michigan and Ontario.

 

 

Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 02/02/2007 03:11 pm
This Envisat image shows parts of the Hebei Province, the Tianjin Municipality and the Bohai Bay of the People's Republic of China.

More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMNSX3ENXE_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 02/09/2007 10:35 am
Manly, Australia, often referred to as Sydney's original seaside resort, is highlighted in this Proba image. Located on the southern end of the Manly Warringah Peninsula in the state of New South Wales, Manly is approximately 11 km northeast of Sydney.

More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEM4FYN2UXE_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 02/16/2007 02:59 pm
A strong wind blows sand and dust across the Mediterranean Sea from the Libyan Desert, located in the northeast section of the Sahara Desert, to Sicily and the southern tip of the Italian Peninsula on 10 February 2007 in this Envisat image.

More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMHNRO2UXE_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 02/23/2007 04:32 pm
The Mississippi River Delta empties sediment into the Gulf of Mexico in this Envisat image acquired on 6 February 2007. The delta's water source comes from the United States' largest river, the Mississippi, which begins its 3 780 km-journey in northern Minnesota, flows south through Wisconsin, Iowa, Illinois, Missouri, Kentucky, Tennessee, Arkansas, Mississippi and Louisiana before spilling into the gulf.

More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEM6A1CE8YE_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 03/02/2007 11:25 am
The changing Larsen-B Ice Shelf, as witnessed over five years by ESA?s Envisat, to mark the week of the fifth anniversary of the environmental satellite and the start of the International Polar Year.

More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMBDIN0LYE_index_0.html
 
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 03/09/2007 09:11 am
This Envisat image highlights the Tibetan Plateau in East Asia. With an average elevation exceeding 5000 metres and an area of 2,5 million square kilometres, it is the highest and largest plateau on Earth.

More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEM4KVP11ZE_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 03/16/2007 04:27 pm
This mosaic of Europe was produced using 143 images acquired by Envisat's onboard Advanced Synthetic Aperture Radar (ASAR) instrument, working in wide swath medium resolution (WSM) mode, between January and May 2006.

More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEM9QLQ08ZE_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 03/23/2007 10:29 am
This Envisat image highlights the contrasting landscapes of the Patagonia Plateau in Argentina (right) and southern Chile (left) with lush greenery, white glaciers, aquamarine lakes and brown arid steppes visible.

Read more at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMB1VS4LZE_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 03/30/2007 04:36 pm
This Envisat image shows the various types of terrain and vegetation cover of the Indus River Valley in the Sindh Province of Pakistan.

More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMJWHT4LZE_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 04/05/2007 05:19 pm
This Envisat image features a snow-covered Iceland, a volcanic island famous for its volcanoes, glaciers, lakes, lava and hot springs.

More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEM3CE7DWZE_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 04/13/2007 10:48 am
Vietnam's Mekong Delta, located on the Indo-China Peninsula, is highlighted in this Envisat image. The delta?s water source is the longest river in Southeast Asia, the seventh longest in Asia and the twelfth longest in the world ? the Mekong.

More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMG2MLJC0F_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 04/20/2007 10:05 am
Montreux, the Swiss Riviera town located on the eastern shore of the crescent-shaped Lake Geneva, is highlighted in this satellite image.

More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMXC3MJC0F_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 04/27/2007 11:27 am
The Sakhalin Island, a large elongated island located in the North Pacific, is featured in this Envisat image.

More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMLUN12Z0F_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 05/04/2007 09:36 am
The northern tip of Mexico?s Yucatan Peninsula, a northeastern projection of Central America, is visible in this Envisat image. Merida, the Yucatan state capital, is clearly seen as a large whitish area to the west some 35 km from the Gulf of Mexico.

More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMUXOU681F_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 05/11/2007 08:40 pm
The diverse terrain of the country of Georgia is highlighted in this Envisat image. This Eurasian country, located on the east coast of the Black Sea, is bounded by Russia to the north, Turkey and Armenia to the south and Azerbaijan to the east.

More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMRS8V681F_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 05/11/2007 08:42 pm
The most detailed portraits ever of the Earth's land surface have been created with ESA's Envisat environmental satellite. The portraits are the first products produced as part of the ESA-initiated GlobCover project and are available online.

Read more at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMZ76V681F_planet_0.html
 
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: MartianBase on 05/12/2007 07:13 am
Quote
jacqmans - 11/5/2007  3:42 PM

The most detailed portraits ever of the Earth's land surface have been created with ESA's Envisat environmental satellite. The portraits are the first products produced as part of the ESA-initiated GlobCover project and are available online.

Read more at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMZ76V681F_planet_0.html
 

why does much of the Philippines, Taiwan and S.Korea appear missing,
 is this urbanization or were these areas left un-mapped ?
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: MKremer on 05/12/2007 07:25 am
That's a darn good question.
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 05/18/2007 09:12 pm
The snow-capped Alps, the Apennines mountain chain and several prominent European lakes are shown in this Envisat image.

More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEM7ZK8RR1F_index_0.html
 
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 05/25/2007 05:12 pm
The Korean Peninsula in East Asia is highlighted in this Envisat image. The 966-km long peninsula is located between the Sea of Japan (East Sea) to the east and the Yellow Sea to the west and is bounded by the Korea Strait to the south.

More at:
http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEM1R89RR1F_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 05/30/2007 06:44 pm
Huge waves that struck Reunion Island and coastlines across Indonesia earlier this month all originated from the same storm that occurred south of Cape Town, South Africa, and were tracked across the entire Indian Ocean for some 10 000 kilometres over a nine-day period by ESA?s Envisat satellite.

Full story at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMMJJ9RR1F_economy_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 06/01/2007 10:53 am
Southeastern Brazil, South America?s largest and most populous country, is highlighted in this 26 May 2007 Envisat image.

More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMC1U9RR1F_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 06/08/2007 12:40 pm
This Proba image acquired on 7 April 2007 shows the sandy coastline between Normandy and Brittany and Mont St. Michel on the north coast of France in the Bay of Mont-Saint-Michel in the English Channel.

Read more at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMOPLEVL2F_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 06/13/2007 09:02 pm
The United Nations chose to mark World Environment Day 2007 in Tromsoe, Norway, to stress the global environmental impact of melting ice and snow. Earth-observing satellites were recognised for their role in identifying and analysing long-term climatic trends and changes in polar regions.

Full story at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMBUUEVL2F_planet_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 06/15/2007 08:31 pm
New Zealand's South Island is highlighted in this Envisat image. Located in the South Pacific Ocean, New Zealand is comprised of two major islands - North and South - and a number of smaller islands.

More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMKJOXXV2F_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 06/22/2007 01:51 pm
This Envisat image shows the volcanic islands of Hawaii in the Pacific Ocean. Hawaii, admitted as the 50th of the United States in 1959, is the only state comprised totally of islands. Visible in the image from right to left are the eight major islands – the Big Island of Hawaii, Kahoolawe, Maui, Lanai, Molokai, Oahu, Kauai and Niihau.

Full story:
http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMQKJ8OY2F_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 06/29/2007 11:04 am
This Envisat image shows the southern part of the Caspian Sea, the world’s largest inland body of water with a total surface area of 371 000 square kilometres.

More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMXNH9OY2F_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 07/07/2007 08:35 am
Grande Terre, the main island of the French territory of New Caledonia, is highlighted in this Envisat image. Grande Terre is a long, narrow island (390 km by 50 km) composed of a mountainous central spine with the eastern side characterised by steep slopes and the western side by lowland plains.

More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEM0ZRNSP3F_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 07/11/2007 04:26 pm
Indonesia’s Mount Gamkonora volcano is spewing hot ash and smoke into the air, as seen in this image taken by the MERIS instrument aboard ESA’s satellite Envisat, causing more than 8000 people to be evacuated amid fears of an imminent eruption, according to officials.

More at:
http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEM9RXGYX3F_planet_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 07/13/2007 09:38 am
This Envisat image features the ice-connected Queen Elizabeth Islands, Baffin Island and the northwestern tip of Greenland - the world's largest island.

More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMY56HYX3F_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 07/20/2007 01:27 pm
This Proba image features Australia’s capital city, Canberra. Located some 280 km southwest of Sydney and 650 km northeast of Melbourne, Canberra was chosen as the nation’s capital location in 1908.

More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEM10GB474F_index_0.html
Title: RE: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 07/27/2007 02:34 pm
Floods and fires across Europe captured from space

27 July 2007

Highlighting the extreme weather conditions hitting Europe, space sensors aboard ESA’s Envisat satellite have detected the worst floodwaters to hit Britain for 60 years and deadly fires raging through southern Europe.
 
Heavy rains caused the River Thames to burst its banks on Wednesday, forcing the evacuation of hundreds of homes in Britain’s university city of Oxford. The flooding across England and Wales has left tens of thousands without electricity and water.

http://www.esa.int/esaCP/SEMM80C474F_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 07/27/2007 04:42 pm
This Envisat image acquired on 30 June 2007 captures smoke blasting from the Kliuchevskoi Volcano on the Kamchatka Peninsula in Russia. Ash plumes are reported to have risen to an altitude greater than 10 km on this day, according to the Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team.

More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMTJZB474F_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 08/01/2007 04:57 pm
More than 11 000 people have been evacuated from two of Spain's Canary Islands - Tenerife and Gran Canaria - as firefighters try to get the blazes under control, according to local authorities.

Read more at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMHLEWUP4F_environment_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 08/04/2007 10:55 am
Winter snow blankets the heights of the Drakensberg Mountains in Lesotho in this Envisat image acquired over southern Africa.

More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMYMSWUP4F_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 08/10/2007 11:25 am
This Envisat radar image highlights the recent flooding in Bangladesh and parts of India brought on by two weeks of persistent rain.
 
More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMYUIUL05F_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 08/17/2007 12:06 pm
Canada’s James Bay is featured in this Envisat image. James Bay, the southern inlet of Hudson Bay in eastern Canada, is located between the provinces of Quebec (right) and Ontario (left), Canada.

More at:
http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMI0JUL05F_index_0.html
Title: RE: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 08/21/2007 02:20 pm
ESA satellites are tracking the path of Hurricane Dean as it rips across the Caribbean Sea carrying winds as high as 260 km per hour. The hurricane, which has already claimed eight lives, is forecast to slam into Mexico’s Yucatan Peninsula on Tuesday morning.

More at: http://www.esa.int/esaCP/index.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: E_ E_ H on 08/23/2007 11:50 am
Quote
Rocket Ronnie - 15/9/2006  3:11 PM

Anyone seen on of the UK from the Shuttle?

I have a movie clip of the South of England somewhere about. I'll post it on here...
Title: RE: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: E_ E_ H on 08/23/2007 12:11 pm
Found it. I think it's STS111. Endeavour, 2002.

This is London and my home - Southampton, at night. Short but a nice clip. I added the text myself. I was adding the footage to a movie I sent to an ex who was on Ops in the Balkans with the Army at the time.
Title: RE: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 08/24/2007 10:55 am
This Envisat image highlights Japan, which consists of a string of islands stretching for some 2400 km through the western Pacific Ocean.

More at:
http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMG2JUL05F_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 08/27/2007 08:52 pm
Hot spots across Southeastern Europe from 21 to 26 August have been detected with instruments aboard ESA satellites, which have been continuously surveying fires burning across the Earth's surface for a decade.

Full story:
http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMLMOLPQ5F_index_0.html
Title: RE: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 08/31/2007 09:50 am
This Envisat image taken on 30 August 2007 captures the devastation to Greece's landscape after blazes burned out of control for a week, killing more than 60 people.

More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMTY5MPQ5F_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: ApolloLee on 08/31/2007 05:17 pm
Check out this neat new image from Bigelow Aerospace's Genesis II:

http://www.bigelowaerospace.com/images/how_did_they_do_it.jpg
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 09/07/2007 02:01 pm
The port of Rotterdam and the province of Zeeland, both located in the southwest of the Netherlands, are highlighted in this Envisat image.

More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEM27UMPQ5F_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 09/14/2007 03:39 pm
This Envisat image features the Republic of Guinea-Bissau located in Western Africa. With an area of 36 125 sq km, it is one of the smallest nations in continental Africa.

More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMG5A13J6F_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 09/17/2007 04:04 pm
The area covered by sea ice in the Arctic has shrunk to its lowest level this week since satellite measurements began nearly 30 years ago, opening up the Northwest Passage - a long-sought short cut between Europe and Asia that has been historically impassable.

Full story at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMYTC13J6F_planet_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 09/21/2007 11:39 am
This Envisat image highlights several of the lakes in the southeastern part of the Republic of Kazakhstan and in the northeastern area of Kyrgyzstan.

More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEM1XWB1S6F_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 10/03/2007 09:51 am
This Envisat image highlights an ice-free Foxe Basin - a nearly circular shallow extension of the Atlantic Ocean - located in the Canadian territory of Nunavut.

More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMMUU6H07F_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 10/05/2007 11:00 am
This image acquired by Envisat's Advanced Along Track Scanning Radiometer (AATSR) instrument dramatically illustrates the complexity of the thermal currents at play in the Southern Mediterranean off the coast of Northern Libya.

More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMM5YU7D7F_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 10/12/2007 02:07 pm
This Envisat image highlights the orange autumn foliage of the forested areas in the basin of Lake Superior (image centre), one of the five Great Lakes located in the heart of eastern North America.

More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEM6DD2PL7F_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 10/19/2007 02:18 pm
This animation, comprised of images acquired by Envisat's Advanced Synthetic Aperture Radar (ASAR) instrument, shows the breaking away of a giant iceberg from the Pine Island Glacier in West Antarctica. Spanning 34 km in length by 20 km in width, the new iceberg covers an area nearly half the size of Greater London.

Read more at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEM9C9JJX7F_index_0.html
Title: RE: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 10/22/2007 04:51 pm
This Envisat image captures the smoke arising from raging wildfires burning in Los Angeles, California. Nearly a dozen wildfires driven by strong easterly winds ripped across Southern California on Sunday, killing one person and forcing thousands to evacuate their homes.

More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEM9703Z28F_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 10/26/2007 03:03 pm
This Envisat images highlights the Orange River in Southwest Africa. Rising in the Drakensberg mountains near the South Africa (visible south of the river) and Lesotho border, the Orange River runs westward for 2200 km forming part of the border between South Africa and Namibia (visible north of the river).

More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMSINVH48F_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 10/29/2007 03:23 pm
This Envisat image captures Noel moving westward across the Caribbean Sea. At the time of this acquisition, Noel was a tropical depression but formed into a tropical storm later on Sunday. Noel was projected to reach Haiti and the Dominican Republic early Monday morning before heading toward Cuba and the Bahamas.

More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEM531FWB8F_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 11/05/2007 03:23 pm
Watching the stars set from the surface of the Earth may be a romantic pastime but when a spacecraft does it from orbit, it can reveal hidden details about a planet's atmosphere.

Full story at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMEH3FWB8F_index_0.html
Title: RE: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 11/09/2007 02:31 pm
This Envisat image highlights the Canterbury region of the South Island of New Zealand, which is comprised of two major islands - North and South - and a number of smaller islands.

More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMZL353R8F_index_0.html
Title: RE: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: wally_moot on 11/10/2007 06:15 am
breathtaking!... check out the full image



Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 11/16/2007 01:16 pm
This Envisat image highlights the Paraná River in Brazil. The river is formed on the plateau of south central Brazil by the confluence of the Rio Grande and Paranaíba Rivers.

More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEM84063R8F_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 11/24/2007 08:59 am
This Envisat image highlights the Canadian province of Nova Scotia, located on the eastern seaboard of North America. The province is made up of a mainland peninsula and Cape Breton Island (located to the east).

More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMY4U63R8F_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 12/01/2007 02:49 pm
This image highlights the North and South islands of New Zealand as captured by ESA's Envisat during the spacecraft's 30 000th orbit of Earth.

More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMM7M73R8F_index_0.html
Title: RE: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 12/07/2007 02:54 pm
The vibrant aquamarine-coloured swirls of a plankton bloom decorate the waters of the South Atlantic Ocean just off the shores of the Republic of Namibia in this Envisat image.

More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEM1HB29R9F_index_0.html
Title: RE: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 12/11/2007 08:38 pm
Crude oil from the wrecked 146 000-ton tanker, Hebei Spirit, is seen polluting the sea off South Korea in this Envisat image.

More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEM1CF361AF_index_0.html
Title: RE: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 12/14/2007 10:24 am
This Envisat image features the southern part of Canada's Quebec province, which occupies a territory nearly three times the size of France.

More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMVHZJV3AF_index_0.html
Title: RE: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 12/22/2007 09:19 am
This Envisat image highlights Lake Chad, a freshwater lake located in central Africa at the junction of Chad, Cameroon, Nigeria and Niger.


More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEM0MF2MDAF_index_0.html
Title: RE: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 01/18/2008 03:16 pm
This Envisat image highlights Burma/Myanmar (officially the Union of Myanmar). With a total area of 678 500 sq km, Burma is the largest country in mainland Southeast Asia.


More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEM1A54MDAF_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 01/25/2008 12:09 pm
This image features two manmade islands – Palm Jumeirah (left) and The World – located just off the coast of Dubai in the United Arab Emirates.


More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMXDWEMKBF_index_0.html
Title: RE: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 02/01/2008 02:53 pm
This Envisat image highlights the lower Niger River system in the West African country of Nigeria, where the Niger River (left) and the Benue River merge.


More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEM0X632VBF_index_0.html
Title: RE: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 02/08/2008 10:19 am
This Envisat image features countries of the Middle East, including Turkey, Syria, Lebanon, Israel and Iraq.


More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEM7FUPR4CF_index_0.html
Title: RE: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 02/15/2008 03:10 pm
This Envisat image highlights portions of three of the lakes located in the Western Rift of the Great Rift Valley, a geological fault system of Southwest Asia and East Africa. The series of lakes in and around the Great Rift Valley are referred to as the Great Lakes of Africa.


More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEM3I7VHJCF_index_0.html

Title: RE: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 02/22/2008 09:55 am
This Envisat image highlights the province of Corrientes in northeastern Argentina and the Paraná River.


More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEML0F3CXCF_index_0.html
Title: RE: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 02/29/2008 09:39 am
This Envisat image features the Canadian Arctic Archipelago, which lies to the north of mainland Canada and consists of 94 major islands and more than 36 000 minor ones.


More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMG2XJ26DF_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 03/07/2008 09:12 am
This Envisat image captures the Republic of Nicaragua located in Central America between Honduras to the north, Costa Rica to the south, the Caribbean Sea to the east (right) and the Pacific Ocean to the west.


More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMYJNK26DF_index_0.html
Title: RE: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 03/14/2008 02:48 pm
Envisat captures the break up of the massive A53A iceberg located just east of the South Georgia Island (visible at image bottom) in the southern Atlantic Ocean.


More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMIZLM5NDF_index_0.html
Title: RE: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 03/17/2008 02:28 pm
A new global portrait taken from space details Earth’s land cover with a resolution never before obtained. ESA, in partnership with the UN Food and Agriculture Organisation, presented the preliminary version of the map to scientists last week at the 2nd GlobCover User Consultation workshop held in Rome, Italy.


Read more at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMZ16L26DF_planet_0.html
Title: RE: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 03/28/2008 10:47 am
This animation, comprised of images acquired by Envisat’s Advanced Synthetic Aperture Radar (ASAR), highlights the rapid loss of ice on the Wilkins Ice Shelf from 26 February to 7 March 2008.


More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMMX4R03EF_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 04/04/2008 10:43 am
This Envisat image features the Nenets Autonomous Okrug region and an icy Pechora Sea in Arctic Northwest Russia.


More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEM5RV5QGEF_index_0.html
Title: RE: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 04/11/2008 03:08 pm
Envisat captures sand and dust from the Sahara Desert blowing across the Atlantic Ocean along the coasts of Mauritania (top), Senegal (middle) and Guinea Bissau (bottom). The cloud-covered Cape Verde islands are visible off the coast of Senegal.


More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMZTO3XQEF_index_0.html
Title: RE: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 04/18/2008 09:15 am
This Envisat image features the Gobi Desert, which stretches across vast areas of the Mongolian People's Republic and the Inner Mongolian Autonomous Region of China.


More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMDEC4XQEF_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: ApolloLee on 04/18/2008 03:08 pm
Another set of nice images from Bigelow, including Baja California....

http://www.bigelowaerospace.com/genesis_II/?Recent_Images
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: John44 on 04/23/2008 07:11 pm
THE EARTH VIEWS FROM THE SHUTTLE AND SPACE STATION
http://www.space-multimedia.nl.eu.org/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=3582&Itemid=2

ISS Top Ten Earth Images
http://www.space-multimedia.nl.eu.org/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=3583&Itemid=2
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 04/25/2008 03:12 pm
Earth from Space: image of the week

25 April 2008
This Envisat image features the southeastern part of the Russian Federation, the northeastern tip of the People's Republic of China, the Amur and Ussuri Rivers, the Sikhote-Alin Mountain Range, the Sea of Japan and Sakhalin Island.

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEM5JFSZEFF_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 05/07/2008 12:53 pm
Envisat captured Cyclone Nargis making its way across the Bay of Bengal just south of Myanmar on 1 May 2008. The cyclone hit the coastal region and ripped through the heart of Myanmar on Saturday, devastating the country.


More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMV0TZXUFF_environment_0.html
Title: RE: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 05/08/2008 09:38 am
Chile’s Chaiten Volcano is shown spewing ash and smoke (centre left of image) into the air for hundreds of km over Argentina’s Patagonia Plateau in this Envisat image acquired on 5 May 2008.


More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMYQYZXUFF_planet_0.html
Title: RE: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 05/09/2008 09:59 am
This Envisat image shows the Italian island of Sardinia, situated between the Mediterranean Sea to the west and south, the Tyrrhenian Sea to the east and the Strait of Bonifacio to the north.


More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEM6O20YUFF_index_0.html
Title: RE: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 05/16/2008 09:06 am
This Envisat image captures the green swirls of a phytoplankton bloom in the North Sea off the coast of eastern Scotland.


More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEM7RN0YUFF_index_0.html
Title: RE: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 05/23/2008 11:38 am
This Envisat image features salt flats in the Department of Potosi in southwest Bolivia, near the crest of the Andes Mountains.


More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEM70E1YUFF_index_0.html

Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 05/30/2008 03:53 pm
This Envisat image highlights Canada’s three Maritime Provinces – New Brunswick, Nova Scotia and Prince Edward Island.


More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMIZENKRGF_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 06/06/2008 03:34 pm
This Envisat image features the diverse terrain of the state of Utah, located in the western part of the United States.


More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEM4RLUG3HF_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 06/13/2008 09:47 am
This Envisat image features the northern part of the country of Namibia. Namibia is located on the west coast of southern Africa between Angola and South Africa.


More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEM156VG3HF_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 06/13/2008 02:59 pm
Wilkins Ice Shelf has experienced further break-up with an area of about 160 km² breaking off from 30 May to 31 May 2008. ESA’s Envisat satellite captured the event – the first ever-documented episode to occur in winter.


Read more at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMG58VG3HF_planet_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 06/20/2008 03:09 pm
This Envisat image captures the marginal ice zone, a region that forms at the boundary of open and frozen oceans, of the Greenland Sea during the onset of spring melting.


More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEM4LNRHKHF_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 06/27/2008 09:29 am
The eastern part of Brazil's Amazon Basin and rainforests, located in the state of Pará, is highlighted in this Envisat image.


More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMWY3SHKHF_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 06/27/2008 01:52 pm
Following the extremely hot weather conditions hitting Europe, Norway experienced its biggest forest fire in the last half century earlier this month. Envisat satellite images were used in the fire’s aftermath to get an overview of the damaged area for authorities and insurance companies.


Read more at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEM7T5SHKHF_environment_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 07/04/2008 02:50 pm
Billowing smoke from Northern California wildfires that have burnt more than 1400 km² of land is visible in this Envisat image acquired on 25 June 2008.


More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMJLOSHKHF_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: ApolloLee on 07/10/2008 04:05 pm
Bigelow Aerospace also has an image from the fires....

http://bigelowaerospace.com/genesis_I/?Recent_Images
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 07/10/2008 07:08 pm
Wilkins Ice Shelf hanging by its last thread

10 July 2008
The Wilkins Ice Shelf is experiencing further disintegration that is threatening the collapse of the ice bridge connecting the shelf to Charcot Island. Since the connection to the island in the image centre helps to stabilise the ice shelf, it is likely the break-up of the bridge will put the remainder of the ice shelf at risk.

http://www.esa.int/esaCP/SEM2U5THKHF_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 07/11/2008 09:12 am
Envisat captures sand and dust blowing northeast from the Arabian Peninsula across the Persian Gulf toward Iran.

More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEM107THKHF_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 08/01/2008 09:20 am
Foxe Basin, a nearly circular shallow extension of the Atlantic Ocean that is located in the Canadian territory of Nunavut, is highlighted in this Envisat image.


More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMOK98N9JF_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 08/28/2008 01:24 pm
Following last summer's record minimum ice cover in the Arctic, current observations from ESA's Envisat satellite suggest that the extent of polar sea-ice may again shrink to a level very close to that of last year.


Full story at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMCKX0SAKF_planet_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 09/05/2008 03:21 pm
The development and path of Hurricane Gustav is shown via a sequence of satellite images acquired by Envisat’s Medium Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MERIS) instrument on 25 August, 28 August, 30 August and 1 September 2008.


More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMV0RO4KKF_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 09/05/2008 03:36 pm
ESA, as coordinator of GMES Space Component and related data access, received in response to a call 12 proposals offering to provide data from more than 40 European and non-European Earth Observation satellites to GMES Services over the next years.


Read more at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMOBSO4KKF_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 09/12/2008 03:03 pm
Envisat captures a cluster of aircraft condensation trails, or 'contrails', over southern Italy, the Adriatic Sea and parts of Croatia.


More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEM4HNP4KKF_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 09/19/2008 09:52 am
This Envisat image captures a plankton bloom stretching across the Northeast Passage in the Barents Sea, a rather deep shelf sea with an average depth around 230 m.


More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEM6ZCQ4KKF_index_0.html

Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 09/26/2008 09:22 am
A sandstorm is captured sweeping across central Iraq on 14 September 2008 in this Envisat image.


More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMS8Z5EJLF_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 10/03/2008 01:25 pm
After reaching the second-lowest extent ever recorded last month, sea ice in the Arctic has begun to refreeze in the face of autumn temperatures, closing both the Northern Sea Route and the direct route through the Northwest Passage.


Read more at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEM6MB9FTLF_planet_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 10/07/2008 01:43 pm
The 2008 ozone hole – a thinning in the ozone layer over Antarctica – is larger both in size and ozone loss than 2007 but is not as large as 2006.


Read more at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMREL9FTLF_planet_0.html

Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 10/08/2008 02:08 pm
The Earth Observation Handbook – just released and available online – explains the vital role played by Earth observation satellites in providing the information needed by governments and policymakers to make well-informed decisions for a sustainable future.


More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEM38F6EJLF_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 10/10/2008 03:03 pm
This Envisat image features the island of Iceland covered in the first snow of the 2008 winter.


More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMPFY4N0MF_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 10/17/2008 07:38 pm
One of Russia’s largest reservoirs, the Tsimlyansk, is highlighted in this Envisat image acquired over southern Russia.


More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMZU13IDMF_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 10/31/2008 08:53 am
This Envisat image highlights lakes in the Western Rift of the Great Rift Valley, a geological fault system of Southwest Asia and East Africa. The series of lakes in and around the Great Rift Valley are referred to as the Great Lakes of Africa.


More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMT8E4KXMF_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 11/21/2008 11:57 am
This Envisat image features the Netherlands, with the capital city of Amsterdam visible in white on the south bank of the waterway (North Sea Canal) extending in an east-west direction left above image centre.


More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMXO95DHNF_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 11/28/2008 11:37 am
This Envisat image captures a patch of Sargassum – free-floating seaweed often referred to in nautical lore for entangling ships – off the eastern coast of the United States in the North Atlantic.


More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMH61AWYNF_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 11/28/2008 03:58 pm
New rifts have developed on the Wilkins Ice Shelf that could lead to the opening of the ice bridge that has been preventing the ice shelf from disintegrating and breaking away from the Antarctic Peninsula.


Read more at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMXK5AWYNF_planet_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 12/05/2008 02:57 pm
This Envisat radar image features the northeastern tip of Ellesmere Island (left) in the Canadian Arctic and northwestern Greenland (right) – the world’s largest island.


More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMZJF4Z2OF_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 12/12/2008 10:20 am
The snow-capped, crescent-shaped Alps and Italy’s Apennines mountain chain are shown in this Envisat image. Snowfall in early winter – for meteorologists winter begins on the 1 December – covered the whole mountain areas with fresh snow, while the lower lands in the south and north of the mountains remained snow-free.


More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEM1XHSTGOF_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 12/12/2008 02:23 pm
In light of recent developments that threaten to lead to the break-up of the Wilkins Ice Shelf, ESA is making daily satellite images of the ice shelf available to the public via the 'Webcam' from Space web page in order to monitor the developments as they occur.


Read more at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEM2DKSTGOF_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 12/19/2008 09:10 pm
Sea ice around the North Magnetic Pole, a wandering point on the Earth’s surface, is featured in this Envisat image.


More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEM556TTGOF_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 12/19/2008 09:10 pm
ESA’s global land cover map, which is ten times sharper than any previous global satellite map, is now available to the public online from the GlobCover website. It is the highest resolution land cover map that has been completely validated ever released.


Read more at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMXB7TTGOF_planet_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 01/09/2009 10:12 am
Heavy snowfall in the past days has caused chaos in parts of France and other European countries.

This satellite image shows most of central and northern France covered by a white layer of snow, while regions closer to the Atlantic coast remain largely snow free.

More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMO5RTTGOF_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 01/16/2009 03:40 pm
This Envisat image features an ice-covered James Bay in Canada's Nunavut territory, with the provinces of Quebec (right) and Ontario (left) visible.

More at:
http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMS8HVPXPF_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 01/23/2009 09:44 am
This Envisat image features the Congo River Basin’s rainforests, the second largest in the world after the Amazon, and the Congo River, Africa’s second longest river after the Nile.


More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMEE8WPXPF_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 01/30/2009 01:08 pm
This Envisat image features the Galapagos Islands, an archipelago situated some 1 000 km to the west of Ecuador in the Pacific Ocean.


More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMYYWWPXPF_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 02/06/2009 12:51 pm
This Envisat image features the Atlas Mountains in northwestern Africa. The mountains – an extension of Europe’s Alpine system – stretch some 2 400 km through Morocco, Algeria and Tunisia.


More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMD2VXPXPF_index_0.html

Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 02/13/2009 10:04 am
This Envisat image features the islands of Great Britain and Ireland, located to the northwest of Continental Europe.


More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMYDYVX3RF_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: usn_skwerl on 02/17/2009 08:40 am
Folks rarely comment in this thread, but there's at least one person that appreciates these pics. Thanks from Philly, USA.
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 02/20/2009 11:27 am
This Envisat image taken on 16 February 2009 captures the devastation of Australia’s deadliest wildfires that have scorched more than 3 900 km² of the state of Victoria and claimed more than 200 lives.


More at:


http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMX3OWX3RF_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 02/27/2009 04:35 pm
This Envisat image highlights three of the five Great Lakes of North America. Lakes Huron (left) and Erie (bottom) are partially ice-covered following snow storms in Michigan and Cleveland, while Lake Ontario (right) is completely visible in blue.


More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEM5KPBDNRF_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 03/06/2009 12:28 pm
This Envisat image features an ice-covered Aral Sea, located on the border between Kazakhstan and Uzbekistan in Central Asia. This body of water is actually a lake rather than a sea.

More at:
http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMIRMCDNRF_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 03/13/2009 03:16 pm
This image shows a part of the vast territory of the Plesetsk Cosmodrome - the only orbital launch site situated within European territory - located in the Archangel region (Arkhangelsk Oblast) of northern Russia.

More at:
http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMKWNITYRF_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 03/20/2009 09:43 am
This Envisat image highlights a cloud-free southern Europe, with Spain (lower left), France (centre), Switzerland (upper right) and Italy (lower right) all visible.


More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEM9SSJTYRF_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 03/27/2009 08:58 am
This Envisat image over the North Sea captures numerous aircraft condensation trails, or 'contrails', as well as parts of the Netherlands (upper right), Belgium (lower right) and England (lower left).

Read more at:
http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMZXGKTYRF_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 04/03/2009 08:31 am
This Envisat image features one of the natural wonders of the world – the Great Barrier Reef in the Coral Sea off the east coast of Queensland, Australia.


More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMAP6EH1TF_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 04/09/2009 03:12 pm
This Envisat image captures cloud streets – parallel rows of clouds that align with the wind – and the northern part of the Scandinavian Peninsula, the largest peninsula in Europe.


More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMQVQEH1TF_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 04/17/2009 11:53 am
This Envisat image features Vietnam's Mekong Delta where the Mekong, the world's twelfth longest river, fans out into tributaries and empties into the South China Sea in Southeast Asia.


More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEM96S9NJTF_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 04/24/2009 03:07 pm
This Envisat image highlights Buenos Aires, the coastal capital of Argentina. Situated on the shores of the wide sediment-heavy River Plate, Buenos Aires is home to 12 million people.

More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEM4KKANJTF_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 04/28/2009 03:20 pm
Satellite images show that icebergs have begun to calve from the northern front of the Wilkins Ice Shelf – indicating that the huge shelf has become unstable. This follows the collapse three weeks ago of the ice bridge that had previously linked the Antarctic mainland to Charcot Island.


Read more at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMRAVANJTF_planet_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 04/30/2009 03:16 pm
This Envisat image features a phytoplankton bloom in the Bay of Biscay. The bay, an inlet of the North Atlantic Ocean, is bordered on the east by France’s west coast (visible) and on the south by Spain’s north coast (visible).


More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEM499BNJTF_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 05/09/2009 03:44 am
This Envisat radar image features the Suez Canal, one of the world’s most important waterways, in northeastern Egypt. The canal connects the Red Sea (a small part visible at the bottom of the image) with the Mediterranean Sea (at top), providing ships a direct route between the Mediterranean and Indian Ocean.


More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMUM00YDUF_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 05/15/2009 01:36 pm
This Envisat radar image features six of Hawaii’s eight major volcanic islands. Visible from right to left are the Big Island of Hawaii, Kahoolawe, Maui, Lanai, Molokai and Oahu. In addition to two other major islands, there are also 124 islets.


More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMDUHZVNUF_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 05/22/2009 09:50 am
This Envisat image features the southern tip of Florida, located in the southeast region of the United States. The peninsula juts outs into the Atlantic Ocean (right) and the Gulf of Mexico for more than 550 km.


More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEM5YH0OWUF_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 05/29/2009 09:17 am
This Envisat image features the southern part of Alaska, which is located in the extreme northwest of the North American continent.


More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEM9YL1OWUF_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 06/12/2009 09:03 am
This Envisat mosaic showcases a united Europe from space.

More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMPTS2XTVF_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 06/19/2009 01:51 pm
A partly man-made island located in the Persian Gulf some 25 nautical miles northwest of Abu Dhabi is featured in this image acquired by ALOS – Japan's four-tonne Earth observation satellite.


More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMCCA0P0WF_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 06/26/2009 09:56 am
This radar Envisat acquisition highlights Indonesia’s Kalimantan region in the southern part of tropical Borneo in South East Asia.


More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEM0461P0WF_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 06/26/2009 09:57 am
Space Weather News for June 26, 2009
http://spaceweather.com

VOLCANIC VISTAS: On June 12th, astronauts onboard the International Space Station watched in amazement as Russia's Sarychev Peak volcano erupted directly beneath their spacecraft. The rare photo they took is a must-see.  An enormous sulfur dioxide plume from the eruption is now circumnavigating the globe at northern latitudes, producing spectacular sunsets for international air travelers. Today's edition of http://spaceweather.com features 3D photos of the eruption from space, satellite movies of the sulfur dioxide plume, and a Mars-like view of the volcanic cloud over the Canadian Arctic.   
Title: Sarychev Peak eruption ISS photos/HD animation
Post by: eeergo on 06/27/2009 01:34 pm
Space Weather News for June 26, 2009
http://spaceweather.com (http://spaceweather.com)

VOLCANIC VISTAS: On June 12th, astronauts onboard the International Space Station watched in amazement as Russia's Sarychev Peak volcano erupted directly beneath their spacecraft. The rare photo they took is a must-see.  An enormous sulfur dioxide plume from the eruption is now circumnavigating the globe at northern latitudes, producing spectacular sunsets for international air travelers. Today's edition of http://spaceweather.com (http://spaceweather.com) features 3D photos of the eruption from space, satellite movies of the sulfur dioxide plume, and a Mars-like view of the volcanic cloud over the Canadian Arctic.   


There's a great HD (very HD) animation in this Youtube video made with several -unreleased, from what I've seen- photos taken by the astronauts, giving a very nice sense of perspective. Lots of different angles, velocities and details, really recommended. Definetely worth watching in HD!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LESBxErmZ-U (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LESBxErmZ-U)
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 07/03/2009 12:31 pm
Madagascar, the world’s fourth largest island, is highlighted in this Envisat image.


More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMYZ2S7NWF_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 07/10/2009 08:50 am
These Envisat images highlight the dramatic retreat of the Aral Sea’s shoreline from 2006 to 2009. The Aral Sea was once the world’s fourth-largest inland body of water, but it has been steadily shrinking over the past 50 years since the rivers that fed it were diverted for irrigation projects.


More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMGVT6CTWF_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 07/17/2009 08:54 am
This Envisat radar image features the Dongting Lake and the Yangtze River in south-central China.


More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMGRO916XF_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 07/24/2009 12:28 pm
The Grand Canyon, one of the seven natural wonders of the world, is featured in this Envisat image. The canyon (the rock-like formation stretching across the centre of the image in hues of pink, violet and gray), is located in the U.S. state of Arizona.


More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMVG5E3GXF_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 07/31/2009 10:51 am
This Envisat image highlights the Ganges Delta, the world’s largest delta, in the south Asia area of Bangladesh (visible) and India. The delta plain, about 350-km wide along the Bay of Bengal, is formed by the confluence of the rivers Ganges, the Brahmaputra and Meghna.


More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEM17QE3GXF_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 08/07/2009 08:41 am
This Envisat image captures a large plume of smoke rising from two forest fires that burned out of control earlier this week on the southern tip of the Spanish Canary Island of La Palma.

More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMZJX061YF_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 08/14/2009 10:03 am
This image of vast plains and agricultural fields in central Spain was one of the first images acquired by Spain’s recently launched Deimos-1 satellite.


More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMOHL161YF_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 08/21/2009 09:54 am
Earth from Space: cloud-free France

21 August 2009
This Envisat image features a cloud-free France, located in Western Europe. As visible in the image, France’s topography is one of the most varied in Europe, ranging from broad plains to the continent's highest peak.

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMVR0H7KYF_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 08/25/2009 06:28 am
Greek fires seen from space

24 August 2009
ESA’s Envisat satellite captures thick clouds of smoke billowing from wildfires that have been raging through Greece and are threatening the capital, Athens.

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEM0S8H7KYF_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 08/28/2009 03:40 pm
This Envisat image over the Nunavut territory in the Canadian Arctic captures the contrast of the icy shallower waters of Foxe Basin (top centre) with the warmer deeper waters of Foxe Channel (bottom).


More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEM7KSH7KYF_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 09/04/2009 09:07 am
This Envisat image captures Hurricane Jimena roaring towards Mexico's Baja California Peninsula on 31 August (18:09 UT).


More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMDBEFF5ZF_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 09/11/2009 08:35 am
This Envisat image captures a plankton bloom larger than the country of Greece stretching across the Barents Sea off the tip of northern Europe.


More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMTTWV0EZF_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 09/18/2009 12:16 pm
This IKONOS-2 image captures the busy waterways of the Venetian Lagoon and the islands located northeast of the city of Venice.

More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMYBXFWNZF_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 09/25/2009 07:53 am
This Envisat image captures Asia’s diverse topography, altitude and climate with the snow-sprinkled Himalayan Mountains marking the barrier between the peaks of the Tibetan Plateau (top) in Central Asia and the plains of Nepal, Buthan and India in the Indian subcontinent.

More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMUY4KIWZF_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 10/02/2009 09:51 am
This Envisat image captures the dynamic landscape of the Wadden Sea, a tidal wetlands area in the southeastern part of the North Sea that extends some 450 km along the coasts of the Netherlands, Germany and Denmark.

Read more at:
http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMP7AGNA0G_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 10/09/2009 11:47 am
This Envisat image captures Typhoon Melor spinning in the Pacific Ocean northeast of the Philippines on 6 October before slamming into the main Japanese island of Honshu on Thursday.


More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEM05NXRA0G_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 10/16/2009 10:31 am
This Envisat image captures the Republic of Cape Verde, a group of volcanic islands located in the North Atlantic Ocean some 600 km off Africa’s west coast.


More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMX9KYRA0G_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 10/23/2009 03:14 pm
The image shows the extraordinary landscape of the Tanezrouft Basin, one of the most desolate parts of the Sahara desert, in south-central Algeria. The region is known as ‘land of terror’ because of its lack of water and vegetation.


More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMHXHZRA0G_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 10/30/2009 01:17 pm
The highly indented and ruggedly mountainous coast of eastern Greenland, one of the most isolated habitations in the world, is featured in this Envisat image. Covering more than 2 000 000 sq km, Greenland is the world’s largest island.


More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMEYWAOE1G_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 11/06/2009 03:01 pm
The vast and widely varied landscape of northern Sweden, just below the Arctic Circle, is shown in this SPOT-4 image. Mountains, lakes, rivers, streams, valleys, rocks, boulders and barren cliffs make up this area that is often called ‘Europe’s last wilderness’.


More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEM0FM5RN1G_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 11/13/2009 01:37 pm
This Envisat image captures a depression, or low pressure system, covering most of the North Sea, an arm of the Atlantic Ocean, on Monday 2 November.

More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMPF14VU1G_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 11/20/2009 02:44 pm
Lake Neusiedl, straddling the Austrian–Hungarian border, is featured in this satellite image. The largest steppe lake in Central Europe, Neusiedl covers an area around 315 sq km, with 240 sq km situated in Austria and 75 sq km in Hungary (bottom).


More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMB5S2D62G_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 12/04/2009 06:59 pm
Copenhagen, the capital of Denmark, is highlighted in this image. The largest city in Denmark, Copenhagen is located on the eastern side of the island of Zealand and on the island of Amager.

More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEML68ROS2G_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 12/11/2009 12:09 pm
This Envisat image shows the snow-covered Nunavut territory in the Canadian Arctic. The icy body of water is Fox Basin, a shallow extension of the Atlantic Ocean.


More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMXQH7JT2G_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 12/18/2009 08:46 pm
This Envisat image shows the wind fields over the North Sea around Denmark and northern Germany. The image is centred over the Jutland Peninsula of Denmark, with the German state of Schleswig-Holstein in the lower half.


Read more at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMVEAAK73G_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 01/08/2010 09:36 am
This image captures the rugged and remote Kamchatka Peninsula on Russia's East Coast. The 1250-km long peninsula lies between the Pacific Ocean to the east and the Sea of Okhotsk to the west.


More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMUE1CV34G_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 01/14/2010 07:50 pm
A major 7.0-magnitude earthquake struck the Haitian capital of Port-au-Prince on 12 January, causing major casualties and damage. The quake was followed by several aftershocks with magnitudes over 5.0.
Such a powerful earthquake can make current maps suddenly out of date, causing additional challenges to rescue workers on the ground. Earth observation satellite images can help rescue efforts by providing updated views of how the landscape and the infrastructure have been affected.

Read more at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEM5G7MJ74G_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 01/15/2010 04:23 pm
As rescue workers scramble to provide assistance to hundreds of thousands of people following Haiti’s earthquake, Earth observation satellite data continues to provide updated views of the situation on the ground.


Read more at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMDDBMJ74G_environment_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 01/15/2010 04:23 pm
This Envisat radar image features the eastern side of Ellesmere Island (left), the northernmost Canadian island, and portions of the northwest coast of Greenland (right), the world’s largest island.


More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEML39MJ74G_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 01/22/2010 02:48 pm
This Envisat satellite image captures fog cover over the Po Valley in northern Italy and snow cover over the Alps in south-central Europe.


More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEM50UKOP4G_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 01/29/2010 03:53 pm
This Envisat image captures the deep freeze that has gripped southeastern Europe in recent days, claiming the lives of more than 40 people as temperatures in some areas plunged as low as minus 34 Celsius.


More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEM8GHSJR4G_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 02/05/2010 12:16 pm
This Envisat image features the city of Vancouver in the Canadian province of British Columbia. Vancouver, the third largest city in Canada, is the Host City of the 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games from February 12-28.


More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEME7PVJ15G_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 02/19/2010 02:25 pm
This Envisat image features the Kuwait islands of Warbah and Bubiyan, located at the head of the Persian Gulf.


More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMLQR7CS5G_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 02/26/2010 02:45 pm
Lakes Bakhtegan and Tashk (together known as the Neyriz Lakes) in the Fars Province in southern Iran are featured in this image acquired by ALOS – Japan's four-tonne Earth observation satellite.


More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMRRF1W36G_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 03/05/2010 04:50 pm
This animation, made up of eight Envisat radar images, shows the 97-km long B-9B iceberg ramming into the Mertz Glacier Tongue in Eastern Antarctica in early February. The collision caused a chunk of the glacier’s tongue to snap off, giving birth to another iceberg nearly as large as B-9B.


More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMUD27K56G_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 03/12/2010 03:50 pm
This Envisat image captures sea ice in the Sea of Okhotsk off the northeastern coast of Russia’s Sakhalin Island and the northern tip of Japan’s Hokkaido Island.

More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEM7NT9KF6G_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 03/19/2010 01:44 pm
This Envisat image captures the Baltic Sea, with the northern part of the Gulf of Bothnia, the Gulf of Finland and the Gulf of Riga covered in ice.

More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMFVYCKP6G_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 03/26/2010 02:28 pm
This Envisat image captures New Zealand's North and South Islands, separated by the Cook Strait. Named after James Cook, who in 1770 was the first European to sail through it, the Cook Strait connects the Tasman Sea to the west with the South Pacific Ocean to the east.


More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMALV8I77G_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 04/01/2010 08:04 pm
Despite the hardest winter in the UK for the last 30 years, and the heavy snow-falls of the last few days in Scotland, there are signs from space that spring is finally on its way.


Read more at:

http://www.esa.int/SPECIALS/Space_for_our_climate/SEMF4QIK97G_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 04/01/2010 08:04 pm
This Envisat Advanced Synthetic Aperture Radar (ASAR) composite image shows the Bay of Naples off the west coast of Italy. The bay is lined to the south by the Sorrento Peninsula – where the world-famous Amalfi coast runs along its southern edge. Just beyond the tip of the peninsula lies the beautiful island of Capri. The islands of Ischia, renowned for its thermal springs, and Procida can be seen to the top of the bay.


More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMIDRIK97G_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 04/09/2010 03:08 pm
This satellite image shows the ever-moving sandbanks in the shallow Wadden Sea in the north of the Netherlands. Declared a UNESCO World Heritage Site last year, this unique region is one of the largest wetlands in the world.


More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMGMG0OK7G_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 04/15/2010 06:37 pm
Animation of the ash plume from Icelandic eruption

15 April 2010
This animation shows the movement of the ash plume from the eruption of the Eyjafjallajoekull glacier in Iceland.

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMKDU9MT7G_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 04/15/2010 06:37 pm
This image, acquired today by ESA's Envisat satellite, shows the vast cloud of volcanic ash sweeping across the UK from the eruption in Iceland, more than 1000 km away.

Read more at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMFYR9MT7G_planet_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 04/16/2010 12:32 pm
This Envisat image captures sea ice and cloud streets in the Svalbard Archipelago, located north of mainland Europe half way between Norway and the North Pole between the Arctic Ocean (top), Barents Sea (bottom right), Greenland Sea (bottom left) and Norwegian Sea.


More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMPXV9MT7G_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: cozmicray on 04/16/2010 02:52 pm
Perhaps a better Image of the week

The MODIS instrument on NASA's Terra satellite captured an Ash plume from Eyjafjallajokull Volcano over the North Atlantic at 11:35 UTC (7:35 a.m. EDT) on April 15, 2010.

http://www.nasa.gov/topics/earth/features/iceland-volcano-plume.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 04/19/2010 02:55 pm
In this image taken just under two hours ago (14:45 CET) by ESA’s Envisat satellite, a heavy plume of ash from the Eyjafjallajoekull Volcano is seen travelling in a roughly southeasterly direction.


More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMM16XN58G_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 04/23/2010 03:45 pm
These two Envisat images over the North Sea illustrate the absence of aircraft over Europe following the ban on air travel enforced due to safety concerns over volcanic ash plumes billowing from the recent eruption in Iceland.


More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMGVWF098G_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 04/30/2010 01:28 pm
This Envisat image captures volcanoes dotted across the landscape in Tanzania, including the distinctive Ol Doinyo Lengai, in the Great Rift Valley of East Africa.


More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMYRGHMI8G_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 04/30/2010 01:29 pm
In this latest image acquired by ESA’s Envisat on Thursday at 16:23 UTC, oil from the massive spill in the Gulf of Mexico can be seen as a dark blue swirl advancing toward the Louisiana coast.


Read more at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMW1HHMI8G_environment_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 05/14/2010 09:59 am
Envisat captures a crescent-shaped string of plankton in the North Sea weaving through the Scandinavian region.

More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMKVW7Q69G_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 05/19/2010 01:36 pm
Gulf of Mexico oil spill in the Loop Current
 
19 May 2010
Scientists monitoring the US oil spill with ESA's Envisat radar satellite say that it has entered the Loop Current, a powerful conveyor belt that flows clockwise around the Gulf of Mexico towards Florida.

http://www.esa.int/esaCP/SEMBKST889G_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 06/04/2010 04:29 pm
Earth from Space: A smoke-free Iceland

4 June 2010
This Envisat image features a smoke-free Iceland. Although the island has received a lot of attention in the past months for its volcanic activity, it is also home to numerous glaciers, lakes, lava and hot springs.

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEM8SH5XT9G_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 06/11/2010 11:00 am
11 June 2010

This false-colour Envisat image highlights a unique cloud formation, created by ‘Von Karman vortices’, south of the Canary Island archipelago, some 95 km from the northwest coast of Africa (right) in the Atlantic Ocean.

More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEM2UOPK2AG_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 06/25/2010 02:13 pm
This ALOS satellite image over the county of Hordaland in western Norway illustrates the region’s diverse landscape of fjords, mountain plateaus and fertile valleys.


More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMH60MZLAG_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 06/29/2010 01:10 pm
Image of the day: Oil still entering Loop Current

29 June 2010
This Envisat radar image acquired over the Gulf of Mexico on 22 June 2010 shows that the oil spill (outlined in white) has radiated all over the Gulf of Mexico basin and is also continuing to feed into the Loop Current (red arrow).

http://www.esa.int/SPECIALS/Living_Planet_Symposium_2010/SEMBF3MZLAG_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 07/02/2010 12:58 pm
This Envisat Advanced Synthetic Aperture Radar interferogram over the Kenyan section of the Great Rift Valley shows small surface displacements that are not visible to the naked eye of the Longonot. In the background is Suswa volcano, which was not deforming at this time.

More at:

http://www.esa.int/SPECIALS/Living_Planet_Symposium_2010/SEMPE9PZVAG_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 07/09/2010 08:45 am
9 July 2010  This Envisat image features the vibrant colours and varied terrain that will serve as the backdrop for the 2010 World Cup final on Sunday, as the Netherlands and Spain play for the title in the city of Johannesburg.

More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMIDOO2CBG_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 07/16/2010 01:40 pm
This Envisat image captures blue-green algae blooms filling the Baltic Sea, which is roughly 1600 km long, 190 km wide and has a surface area of about 377 000 sq km.

More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMKO50PFBG_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 07/23/2010 11:34 am
Earth from Space: Rock desert

23 July 2010
This Envisat radar image features the terrain of the Gobi Desert, which stretches across vast areas of the Mongolian People's Republic and the Inner Mongolian Autonomous Region of China.

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMMFKWNPBG_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: Art LeBrun on 07/23/2010 03:19 pm
That was a fascinating image and information bit on the Gobi!
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 07/30/2010 01:51 pm
30 July 2010
Central Russia and the Moscow region are experiencing their hottest July in history, with record temperatures reaching over 35ºC posing a high fire risk. Several large smoke plumes originating from burning peat fields and forest fires are visible in this Envisat image covering the area east of Moscow.

More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMWTBZNZBG_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 08/13/2010 03:54 pm
13 August 2010
Resembling the brush strokes of French Impressionist Claude Monet, electric blue-coloured plankton blooms swirl in the North Atlantic Ocean off Ireland in this Envisat image.

More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEM09F5OJCG_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 09/02/2010 09:59 am
Earth observation aids disaster relief in Pakistan
 
2 September 2010
Devastating around a third of the country, it is estimated that the floods in Pakistan have affected up to 20 million people. As part of the effort to support humanitarian relief, satellite data are being used to generate essential maps of the flooded areas.

http://www.esa.int/esaCP/SEMOL8EODDG_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 09/03/2010 09:33 am
3 September 2010

ESA's Envisat satellite has been tracking the progression of the giant iceberg that calved from Greenland's Petermann glacier on 4 August 2010. This animation shows that the iceberg, the largest in the northern hemisphere, is now entering Nares Strait – a stretch of water that connects the Lincoln Sea and Arctic Ocean with Baffin Bay.

More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEM5SIEODDG_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 09/10/2010 02:06 pm
10 September 2010

Envisat captures sand and dust from the Sahara Desert blowing west across Mauritania, Senegal and Guinea Bissau and over the North Atlantic Ocean before turning in a northerly direction just above the Cape Verde islands.

More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEM3B9HONDG_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 09/13/2010 08:51 pm
Satellites reveal Russian fires worst in 14 years

13 September 2010
More wildfires have burned around the Russian capital this year than in the last decade and a half, according to sensors aboard ESAs observation satellites. The forest and peat bog fires ignited this summer amid an unprecedented heat wave of up to 40ºC.

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMGQSJOXDG_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 09/17/2010 12:06 pm
17 September 2010
This Envisat image highlights the Lake Eyre Basin, one of the world’s largest internally draining systems, in the heart of Australia. White cloud streaks stand in contrast to the Red Centre’s vast amounts of crimson soil and sparse greenery.

More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMQBCKOXDG_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 09/24/2010 02:21 pm
24 September 2010
This radar Envisat image features Russia’s Volga Delta and the Caspian Sea. The Volga River rises northwest of Moscow and extends southward some 3700 km through the whole central part of the country where it pours into the Caspian, forming a delta of about 800 smaller waterways.

More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMOIBNO7EG_index_0.html


Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 10/01/2010 08:48 am
1 October 2010
The world’s largest offshore wind farm, off the UK’s Kent coast in the North Sea, is seen in this Envisat radar image. The Thanet Offshore Wind Farm opened last week on 23 September, boosting UK wind energy capacity by 30%.

More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEM499QOHEG_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 10/08/2010 10:06 am
8 October 2010
This Envisat radar image shows internal waves in the Strait of Gibraltar, between the southern coast of Spain and the northern coast of Morocco. The strait is the only connection between the Atlantic Ocean and the Mediterranean Sea, making it a place of intense study in order to understand the exchange of water between the two.

More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEM5B5TOREG_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 10/15/2010 01:46 pm
15 October 2010
This Envisat image features the mountains, glaciers and icefields in southeastern Alaska and British Columbia, Canada.

More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMHO4WO1FG_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 10/22/2010 09:18 am
22 October 2010

This Envisat image features Lake Malawi in the Eastern Rift of the Great Rift Valley, a geological fault system of Southwest Asia and East Africa. The series of lakes in and around the Great Rift Valley is referred to as the 'Great Lakes of Africa'.

More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMMN7ZOBFG_index_0.html


Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 10/29/2010 01:32 pm
29 October 2010
This Envisat image features the manmade Lake Mead, located east of Las Vegas and west of the Grand Canyon along the border of the US states of Arizona and Nevada.

More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMTGLKTTFG_index_0.html


Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 11/05/2010 10:11 am
5 November 2010
This Landsat image features the heart-shaped Small Aral Sea (or North Aral Sea), the former northern basin of the Aral Sea that once supported a vibrant economy in Central Asia.

More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEM1S55PVFG_index_0.html


Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: Ben the Space Brit on 11/10/2010 11:32 am
Firstly, thanks to Jacqmans for kindly letting me contribute to his corner of the site.

I originally saw this image on NASAWatch and saved a copy to my hard disc, mostly because it was one of the most striking images of Earth I've ever seen.  This isn't because of what it shows of the Earth, which is mostly featureless seascape and light cloud cover.  It is because of how it is framed in the cupola of the ISS with an astronaut looking on.

When Dennis Tito visited the ISS, he said that it was enough just to sit by a window, listen to music and watch the world go by.  I've got a feeling that this astronaut feels the same.

Now... who wants to have that seat next? ;)
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: Silmfeanor on 11/10/2010 05:09 pm

I originally saw this image on NASAWatch and saved a copy to my hard disc, mostly because it was one of the most striking images of Earth I've ever seen.  This isn't because of what it shows of the Earth, which is mostly featureless seascape and light cloud cover.  It is because of how it is framed in the cupola of the ISS with an astronaut looking on.

When Dennis Tito visited the ISS, he said that it was enough just to sit by a window, listen to music and watch the world go by.  I've got a feeling that this astronaut feels the same.

Now... who wants to have that seat next? ;)

I share that feeling. I saved this picture aswell; it really is superb. The composition, the earth being the old and the cupola window being so sci-fi, plus the astronaut looking outside, looking like she is in deep thought. the light / dark diffirence is also striking. I haven't seen a better one yet.
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 11/12/2010 02:16 pm
12 November 2010
The varied landscapes of the island nations of Great Britain (right) and Ireland (left) are featured in this Envisat image.

More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMI09DR5GG_index_0.html


Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 11/15/2010 08:46 pm
Satellites tracking Mt Merapi volcanic ash clouds
 
15 November 2010
Since its latest series of deadly eruptions, Java's Mt Merapi has been spewing volcanic ash clouds into the air. Satellite data are crucial for assessing the eruption's danger to air traffic and public safety

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMY0Y46JGG_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 11/19/2010 08:40 am
19 November 2010

The pastel colours and soft, flowing shapes in this Envisat radar image of the Tanezrouft Basin in the Algerian Sahara contradict the harshness of the terrain that has led to it being commonly referred to as the ‘Land of Terror’.

More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMW2Q56JGG_index_0.html


Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 11/26/2010 06:45 pm
26 November 2010
This image captures the meticulously planned cultivated landscape of the autonomous communities of Aragon and Catalonia in north-eastern Spain.

More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMC4JNWXGG_index_0.html


Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 12/03/2010 01:43 pm
3 December 2010
This Envisat image captures spectacular geological phenomena – the 'Eye of Africa' and a magnetic mountain – in the Sahara Desert of Mauritania in northern Africa.

More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMXMNOWXGG_index_0.html

Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 12/10/2010 06:22 pm
10 December 2010
This Envisat image features part of the Great Barrier Reef off Australia’s Queensland coast. It is the world’s most protected marine area, one of its natural wonders and a World Heritage site.

More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMU71PR9HG_index_0.html


Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 12/17/2010 07:25 pm
Earth from Space: Siberian 'gecko'

17 December 2010
The gecko-shaped body of water featured in this Envisat image was formed by the Bratsk Reservoir in southeastern Siberia, Russia.

Read more:  http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEML1HSRJHG_index_0.html


Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 01/07/2011 02:23 pm
Earth from Space: Image of the week

This image acquired by Envisat on 2 January shows the inundated areas currently causing misery in Australia's northeastern state of Queensland.

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMZIN0SDIG_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 01/14/2011 04:56 pm
14 January 2011

This wintery ALOS image captures the German capital city of Berlin surrounded by snow. Home to 3.4 million people, Berlin has the second largest population (within city limits) in the European Union after London, UK.

More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMI754SNIG_index_0.html


Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: JosephB on 01/14/2011 05:20 pm
Are there any free websites where one can enter in a city or area and see a good collection of ISS (or other source) photos of that area from space? Thanks!
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: Almurray1958 on 01/14/2011 05:55 pm
Are there any free websites where one can enter in a city or area and see a good collection of ISS (or other source) photos of that area from space? Thanks!

http://eol.jsc.nasa.gov/    Astronaut based photo archive

Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: JosephB on 01/14/2011 06:32 pm
Thanks Al!
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: JosephB on 01/15/2011 02:38 pm
I was wondering about the status of the WORF rack on ISS.
I'm assuming some of the cameras envisaged have much better resolution than the handheld camera photos from the site above. Some are rack mounted, no?

And more to the point, would these be available to the public?
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: Space Pete on 01/15/2011 03:16 pm
I was wondering about the status of the WORF rack on ISS.
I'm assuming some of the cameras envisaged have much better resolution than the handheld camera photos from the site above. Some are rack mounted, no?

And more to the point, would these be available to the public?

Handheld or automated cameras can be rack mounted, but I don't know whether they would have a higher resolution that current cameras.

So far, the only payloads for WORF are EarthKAM (Earth Knowledge Acquired by Middle school students), and ISSAC (ISS Agricultural Camera, formerly AgCam). Ron Garan wrote a blog entry about ISAAC here (http://www.fragileoasis.org/2010/07/27/improving-the-planets-ability-to-feed-all-inhabitants/).

Have a watch of these two videos, they explain WORF and its features very well.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5AAGiMPMwqI

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FN9yr-pBP4M
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: JosephB on 01/15/2011 04:23 pm
Thanks Pete, I have to say you've livened up this sites ISS coverage 100 fold.
For a layman like myself you'd think this rack has a lot of reconnaissance potential, either testing or operational. Are there agreements preventing such usage?
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: Space Pete on 01/15/2011 05:15 pm
Thanks Pete, I have to say you've livened up this sites ISS coverage 100 fold.
For a layman like myself you'd think this rack has a lot of reconnaissance potential, either testing or operational. Are there agreements preventing such usage?

Thanks for the compliment. :)

If the reconnaissance was for military purposes, then yes, the are agreements preventing such usage.

The ISS cannot be used for military purposes by any nation. In 2008, when Russia invaded Georgia, there was a big stink when Roscosmos had a cosmonaut take photographs of the invaded area and send them down to the ground. They got out of it by saying that the images were only for the purposes of assisting with humanitarian efforts.
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 01/21/2011 02:19 pm
Earth from Space: Queensland inundated

21 January 2011
This Envisat Advanced Synthetic Aperture Radar (ASAR) composite image shows the flooded area around Rockhampton in Queensland, Australia.

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMH1W6SXIG_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 01/28/2011 07:44 pm
28 January 2011

This composite image, acquired by Envisat's radar instrument, shows the Danube Delta, Europe's best preserved river delta.

More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEM19QBE8JG_index_0.html


Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 02/04/2011 02:32 pm
4 February 2011
Acquired today by ESA's Envisat satellite, this image shows smoke pouring from Mount Shinmoedake, a volcano in the Kirishima mountain range on Japan's southern island of Kyushu.

Read more at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMD6QY1LJG_index_0.html


Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 02/04/2011 02:32 pm
4 February 2011
This Envisat image captures one of serial snowstorms that hit the United States during January 2011.

More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEM5IOY1LJG_index_0.html


Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 02/11/2011 08:48 am
11 February 2011

The small heart-shaped island of Gale¨njak is featured in this image acquired by ALOS – Japan's four-tonne Earth observation satellite. The 500 m-wide island is situated off the Croatian coast in the Adriatic Sea.

More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMG50MTRJG_index_0.html


Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 02/18/2011 01:54 pm
18 February 2011
The diverse and picturesque contours of southern Italy, known for its boot-like shape, take centre stage in this Envisat image. Its varied landscape is made up of sandy beaches, rugged cliffs, rocky mountains, broad plains, rolling hills and volcanoes.

More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEM6VGPT1KG_index_0.html


Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 03/04/2011 10:59 am
4 March 2011
The contrasting landscape of the western US states of California and Nevada are highlighted in this Envisat image.

More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMBE8VTLKG_index_0.html


Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 03/11/2011 10:11 pm
11 March 2011
The rich agricultural soils of the Imperial Valley in the desert region of Southern California, US, are featured in this image acquired by Japan's four-tonne ALOS Earth observation satellite.

More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEM5JZXTVKG_index_0.html


Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 03/25/2011 05:35 pm
25 March 2011 - Holbox Island and the Yalahau Lagoon on the northeast corner of Mexico’s Yucatan Peninsula are featured in this satellite image.

Holbox is a 42-km-long island running along the peninsula’s coast that is separated from the mainland by Yalahau Lagoon.

One of the world’s most important ecosystems, Holbox and its surrounding waters are part of the Yum Balam Biosphere Reserve.

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMOYZ3UFLG_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: Danderman on 03/30/2011 03:51 pm
View of Misurata airport taken by GeoEye satellite:

http://img.allvoices.com/thumbs/event/598/486/76373906-image-taken.jpg

Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 04/02/2011 10:42 am
http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMNZ27UPLG_index_0.html

1 April 2011


This Envisat image features an almost cloud-free look at a large portion of Europe. The Alps, with its white peaks, stand out in contrast against the vast areas still covered in brownish winter foliage.
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 04/15/2011 02:34 pm
Earth from Space: Dust and plankton

15 April 2011

Envisat captures dust and sand from the Algerian Sahara Desert, located in northern Africa, blowing west across the Atlantic Ocean last week.

http://www.esa.int/SPECIALS/Space_for_our_climate/SEMFON7S9MG_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 04/22/2011 02:47 pm
Earth from Space: Somali bouquet


22 April 2011

The bouquet-resembling landscape of the Gedo region in southwest Somalia is featured in this image acquired by ALOS, Japan's four-tonne Earth observation satellite.

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMUNFYGRMG_index_1.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 04/29/2011 01:40 pm
Earth from Space: Baltic ice

29 April 2011

This Envisat image captures ice covering parts of the Gulf of Bothnia (top), the Gulf of Finland (middle right) and the Gulf of Riga (bottom right) last week.

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMH8AZGRMG_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 05/06/2011 05:34 pm
Earth from Space: Strait of ecological significance
 
6 May 2011

This Envisat image features the Strait of Bonifacio that is renowned for its rich biodiversity, complex physical configuration and difficult weather conditions.

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEM7FTZ57NG_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 05/20/2011 03:55 pm
Earth from Space: Iceberg Alley

20 May 2011

A large chunk of the massive iceberg (centre) that broke off Greenland’s Petermann Glacier in August 2010 is featured floating in the Labrador Sea off the eastern coast of Labrador in this Envisat image.

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEM3EJMSNNG_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 05/23/2011 06:14 pm
Satellites monitor Icelandic ash plume

23-05-2011 12:34 PM CEST

 As Iceland's Grímsvötn volcano spews ash high into the atmosphere, satellite observations are providing essential information to advisory centres assessing the possible hazards to aviation.

http://www.esa.int/esaCP/SEM3WUMSNNG_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 05/27/2011 08:53 am
Earth from Space: Airplanes and volcanic ash

27 May 2011

This Envisat image shows a large cloud of ash north-east of Scotland that has been carried by winds from Iceland’s Grímsvötn volcano about 1000 km away.

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMD5RNSNNG_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 06/11/2011 09:06 am
Earth from Space: A gush of volcanic gas

10 June 2011
This image shows the huge plume of sulphur dioxide that spewed from Chile’s Puyehue-Cordón Caulle Volcanic Complex, which lies in the Andes about 600 km south of Santiago.

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMVXERHPOG_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 06/17/2011 05:40 pm
Yukon Delta

17 June 2011

This Envisat image features Alaska’s Yukon Delta, where the Yukon River, North America’s fifth-longest river system, fans out into a labyrinth of distributaries before emptying into the Bering Sea.


http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMZCYD1XOG_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 06/24/2011 06:38 pm
Earth from Space: Jewel of the Persian Gulf

24 June 2011
This Envisat image features the largest island in the Persian Gulf: Iran’s Qeshm Island.

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMN9D037PG_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 07/01/2011 07:41 pm
Earth from Space: Summer ice retreat

1 July 2011

As we embrace the start of the summer months in the northern hemisphere, Envisat has captured this image of part of Greenland's ice sheet and east coast as the winter sea ice recedes.
 
Covering roughly 80% of the surface of Greenland, this ice sheet is the second largest body of ice in the world, after that of Antarctica.
However, last year's temperatures, along with those of 2005 and 1998, were the highest since modern global temperature record-keeping began in 1880, heightening concerns about the rates of ice melt.

Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 07/08/2011 08:41 pm
Earth from Space: Island swirls

8 July 2011

This Envisat image shows the volcanic island of Guadalupe peeking through the clouds. The island lies in the Pacific Ocean around 250 km off the west coast of Mexico's Baja California peninsula.

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMOS57TLPG_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 07/15/2011 03:45 pm
Earth from Space: Tanzanian lake
 
15 July 2011

This image from Japan’s ALOS Earth observation satellite shows Lake Sulunga and surrounding areas in central Tanzania.
 
Measuring about 25 km wide and 42 km long, Sulunga lies 45 km west of the capital, Dodoma.

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMLLZ9TVPG_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 07/22/2011 04:11 pm
Earth from Space: Patagonia ups and downs
 
22 July 2011

This Envisat image is dominated by southern Argentina, with the mountainous terrain of the Andes in Chile to the west (left).
 
The lush, snow-capped mountains slope into the arid inland areas of Argentina’s Chubut province and neighbouring Santa Cruz province to its south – home to a series of plateaus and depressions.

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMDLYCT5QG_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 07/29/2011 10:15 pm

Earth from Space: Volcanic land
 
29 July 2011

This Envisat image shows the eastern coast of the Kamchatka Peninsula, in Russia’s far east between the Pacific Ocean and Sea of Okhotsk.

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMPQXFTFQG_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 08/06/2011 07:45 am
Earth from Space: Madagascar jellyfish

5 August 2011

The Betsiboka estuary in northwest Madagascar is pictured in this image from Japan’s ALOS observation satellite.

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMK6VITPQG_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 08/12/2011 06:57 pm
Earth from Space: African gem

12 August 2011

This Envisat image shows southern Namibia and northern South Africa on Africa’s lower-west coast.

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMHDGJTPQG_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 08/26/2011 03:43 pm
Earth from Space: Summer in bloom

26 August 2011

The phytoplankton bloom pictured in this Envisat image stretches across the Barents Sea off the coast of mainland Europe’s most northern point, Cape Nordkinn.

http://www.esa.int/SPECIALS/Space_for_our_climate/SEMMPXRTJRG_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: Beemer on 08/26/2011 11:45 pm
Truly spectacular photographs.

Thanks for posting them!
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 09/10/2011 03:01 pm
Earth from Space: Sacred stones of the outback

9 September 2011

This Landsat image takes us to the Amadeus Basin in the heart of the Australian outback.

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMDDQJ37SG_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 09/16/2011 04:54 pm
Earth from Space: Floating city

16 September 2011

The islands that make up the Italian city of Venice and the surrounding Venetian Lagoon are pictured in this image from the Ikonos-2 satellite.

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEM44R0UDSG_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 09/23/2011 01:38 pm
Earth from Space: Bachu elevations

23 September 2011

This week, we take a look at the varied elevations of Bachu in western China in an image developed using data from the two ERS satellites.

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMO8T3UNSG_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 10/01/2011 10:56 am
Earth from Space: Brazilian coast

30 September 2011

This Envisat image shows a portion of the southeastern coast of Brazil, South America’s largest and most populous country.

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMTYW6UXSG_index_0.html


Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 10/07/2011 03:14 pm
7 October 2011

Spitsbergen, Norway’s largest island, is pictured in this Envisat image.
 
Bordered by the Arctic Ocean to its north and the Greenland Sea to its west, Spitsbergen is the largest and only permanently populated island of the Svalbard archipelago.

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMZ5S9U7TG_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 10/14/2011 05:15 pm
Earth from Space: Volcanic Canaries

14 October 2011
The subtropical Canary Islands off Africa’s west coast are pictured in this Envisat image.
 
The Canary Islands’ favourable climate and beaches attract over 12 million visitors per year. Perhaps some beach-goers were on those aircraft that left the multiple contrails over the dark blue water to the north.

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMC8UCUHTG_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 10/23/2011 04:29 pm
21 October 2011

This Envisat image is dominated by the island of Crete separating the Aegean and Libyan Seas in the eastern Mediterranean.

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMLH2GURTG_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 11/04/2011 08:59 am
Earth from Space: Australian basin

4 November 2011

This Landsat satellite image from 31 May shows a portion of the Lake Eyre drainage basin in the remote outback of South Australia.


http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMI7DLUBUG_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 11/26/2011 07:18 am
Earth from Space: Reclaimed lands

25 November 2011

This Landsat image from 6 September 2010 shows the intertidal Wadden Sea and two shallow, artificial lakes in the Netherlands.
 
The biologically diverse sea was declared a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 2009. This unique region is one of the largest wetlands in the world.

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMD1LZW5VG_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 12/02/2011 12:01 pm
Earth from Space: Salt Lake
 
2 December 2011

This Envisat radar composite image shows Salt Lake City and the nearby Great Salt Lake in the US state of Utah.

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMI852XFVG_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 12/11/2011 09:34 am
Earth from Space: Bumpy borders

The Tian Shan mountains, stretching across the border region of Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan and western China, are pictured in this image, acquired on 7 September 2011 by Envisat’s Medium Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MERIS). The large, dark lake that splits the mountain range in eastern Kyrgyzstan (lower-left corner) is the second largest saline lake after the Caspian Sea. In the upper-right corner are the Dzungarian Basin and its Gurbantunggut Desert in light brown.

For further information, please visit: www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMG0B5XPVG_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 12/16/2011 12:33 pm
16 December 2011

This Envisat image shows western India and southern Pakistan, with the Indus River snaking through Pakistan’s Sindh province before emptying into the Arabian Sea.
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 12/23/2011 03:15 pm
Earth from Space: Arid Arabia

23 December 2011

This image, acquired on 28 October by Envisat, shows central Saudi Arabia on the arid Arabian Peninsula.

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMWEMBX9WG_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 01/13/2012 01:53 pm
Earth from Space: A southern summer bloom
 
13 January 2012
In this Envisat image, a phytoplankton bloom swirls a figure-of-8 in the South Atlantic Ocean about 600 km east of the Falkland Islands.

http://www.esa.int/SPECIALS/Space_for_our_climate/SEMB88KX3XG_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 01/20/2012 09:14 pm
Earth from Space: Golden curves

20 January 2012

The curving sands in central northern Iran’s salt desert, Dasht-e Kavir, can be seen in this image from the Ikonos-2 satellite.

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMLFANXDXG_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 01/27/2012 02:27 pm
Earth from Space: Sahara’s end

27 January 2012

This Envisat image shows part of central Morocco from the Atlantic Ocean to the west, over the Atlas mountains and into arid parts of Algeria further inland.

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEM0T5I8RXG_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 02/03/2012 01:20 pm
3 February 2012

The Chinese city of Shanghai sits at the mouth of the Yangtze River where it empties into the East China Sea.

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEM7J8TXXXG_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 02/12/2012 08:29 am
10 February 2012

The snow-kissed Alps that stretch across France, Italy, Switzerland, Germany, Liechtenstein, Austria and Slovenia are captured in this Envisat image.

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMLADWX7YG_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 02/17/2012 02:44 pm
17 February 2012
This Envisat image of the Horn of Africa shows parts of Ethiopia, Eritrea, Djibouti and, to the northeast across the Red Sea, a portion of Yemen’s west coast.
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 02/24/2012 12:56 pm
Earth from Space: Rügen on the rocks

24 February 2012

The icy waters of the Baltic Sea surrounding Germany’s largest island, Rügen, are pictured in this image from Japan’s ALOS observation satellite.
Connected to mainland Germany at the city of Stralsund, Rügen has lush landscapes and over 570 km of coastline.

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMY4PKV0ZG_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 03/03/2012 09:05 am
 Historical view

2 March 2012
West Africa’s coast along the Atlantic Ocean is pictured in this first image from Envisat’s MERIS instrument nearly a decade ago.
 
This week, Envisat celebrated ten years in orbit. The Medium Resolution Imaging Spectrometer – or MERIS – on board the satellite was developed to measure sea colour in oceans and coastal areas, although it has been used for a variety of additional applications over the years.

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMXU95Y1ZG_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 03/09/2012 02:39 pm
Earth from Space: Algerian sands

9 March 2012

This image from the Ikonos-2 satellite shows the sandy and rocky terrain of the Sahara desert in western Algeria.

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMZA68YBZG_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 03/17/2012 09:54 am
Earth from Space: Far east

16 March 2012

The Sikhote–Alin mountain range in Russia’s Far East is pictured in this image from Envisat.
 
The central portion of this mountain range is on the UNESCO World Heritage List because it contains one the richest and most unusual temperate forests of the world.

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMJK1BYLZG_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 03/24/2012 10:34 am
Earth from Space: Where worlds collide

23 March 2012

This image from the Envisat satellite is dominated by the Indonesian islands of Bali, Lombok and Sumbawa.

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEM4VY2T00H_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 03/31/2012 09:31 am
Earth from Space: Night lights
 
30 March 2012
 
This animation is made up of two images of Europe at night showing lights from sources in cities and along roads in 1992 and 2010. Bright areas highly correlate with high population density – such as the densely populated cities like London, Paris and Rome. Coastal areas are also more populated than inland regions, making the outline of Europe clearly visible in these night images.

The images were acquired by the United States’ DMSP satellites. The DMSP satellites are run by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, monitoring the meteorological, oceanographic and solar–terrestrial physics environments for the US Department of Defense. Data from DMSP’s Operational Linescan System can be used to see city lights.

Credits: NGDC/DMSP/ESA
 
http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMFD3HY50H_index_1.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: Chris Bergin on 04/03/2012 01:44 pm
Not image of the week, but it's probably in with a shout:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/astro_andre/6890185644/

Epic!
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: Space Pete on 04/03/2012 03:03 pm
Not image of the week, but it's probably in with a shout:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/astro_andre/6890185644/

Epic!

I can see my house from here! :)

BTW, NASA have a similar image in higher-res, although it doesn't give as good of a view of the UK:
http://www.spaceflight.nasa.gov/gallery/images/station/crew-30/html/iss030e177670.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 04/13/2012 02:07 pm
13 April 2012

Frozen lakes dotting the Tibetan Plateau in Central Asia are pictured in this image from ESA’s Envisat satellite.

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEM23JHWP0H_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 04/27/2012 02:28 pm
Earth from Space: Rainforest river

27 April 2012

This image from the Envisat satellite shows the Juruá River snaking through the Amazon rainforest in western Brazil.

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMSDONW91H_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 05/18/2012 02:25 pm
Earth from Space: Desert growth

18 May 2012

These false-colour Landsat images from 1984, 1990, 2000 and 2011 show agricultural development in northern Saudi Arabia close to the border with Jordan, about 150 km west of the city of Sakakah.

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMH2IWW32H_index_1.html

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMH2IWW32H_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 05/26/2012 12:11 pm
Earth from Space: Mississippi River Delta
 
25 May 2012

This Landsat image of 3 October 2011 shows the Mississippi River Delta, where the largest river in the United States empties into the Gulf of Mexico.

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEM2ZKZWD2H_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 06/02/2012 09:16 am
Earth from Space: Africa’s largest and highest

1 June 2012

The border region of southern Kenya and northern Tanzania – with a small portion of south eastern Uganda – is pictured in this Envisat image.
 
Lake Victoria straddles all three countries. Named after Queen Victoria in the mid-1800s, it is the largest African lake by area and supports the continent’s largest inland fishery.

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEM6YB2XN2H_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 06/09/2012 09:44 am
Earth from Space: Pine Island cracked

8 June 2012
This image from the Envisat satellite shows the Pine Island Glacier in West Antarctica.
 
Pine Island is the largest glacier in the West Antarctic Ice Sheet and one of the fastest ice streams on the continent, flowing into Pine Island Bay in the Amundsen Sea.

Ten percent of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet drains out to the sea by way of this glacier.

http://www.esa.int/SPECIALS/Envisat/SEMI6F5XX2H_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 06/29/2012 02:40 pm
Earth from Space: Arid Atacama
 
29 June 2012
The southern Atacama Desert is pictured in this Envisat image, with the border of Chile (west) and Argentina (east) running down the middle.
 
The Atacama is believed to be the driest desert in the world, and the lack of cloud cover in this image highlights the dry climate.

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEM9Z81VW3H_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 07/07/2012 11:37 am
Earth from Space: Tidal island

6 July 2012
This image from the Pleiades satellite shows the island of Mont Saint Michel and its surrounding bay in northwest France.
 
Even at about 700 km away, the satellite captured a clear picture of Mont Saint Michel and its structures – such as the spire towering over the central abbey – with their shadows cast over the water to the north.
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 07/13/2012 01:58 pm
13 July 2012

This image from Japan’s ALOS satellite shows southern France and the divide of the Rhone River: the 'Grand Rhône' flows down the centre of the image while the 'Petit Rhône' is visible to the west.

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMPOFKXB4H_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 07/21/2012 03:45 pm
Earth from Space: Caribbean islands

20 July 2012
The Caribbean country of Cuba is pictured in this image from the Envisat satellite.
 
Cuba is an archipelago of islands in the northern Caribbean Sea at the confluence with the Gulf of Mexico and the Atlantic Ocean.

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEM8C3VTP4H_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 09/07/2012 06:33 pm
Earth from Space: Chernozem cropland
 
7 September 2012
An area with extensive agricultural use in western Russia is pictured in this image from Japan’s ALOS satellite, with roads and rivers cutting through the cropland.
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 09/29/2012 10:56 am
Earth from Space: Planted patchwork

28 September 2012

This false-colour Landsat image from 4 May shows agricultural structures in the US state of Kansas.

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMUNZDRI7H_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 10/06/2012 01:52 pm
Earth from Space: Iceland

5 October 2012

This Envisat image shows us a very rare, cloud-free view of Iceland. Located in the North Atlantic Ocean east of Greenland and immediately south of the Arctic Circle, Iceland is the westernmost European nation, and has more land covered by glaciers than the whole of continental Europe.

http://www.esa.int/SPECIALS/Envisat/SEM1T2FRI7H_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 10/13/2012 09:54 am
Earth from Space: Downtown Dubai
 
12 October 2012

This image from the Pleiades satellite shows part of Dubai in the United Arab Emirates.
http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMVS63S18H_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 10/19/2012 11:50 am
Earth from Space: Kimberley

19 October 2012

Western Australia’s Kimberley region, with a coastline along the Timor Sea, is pictured in this Envisat image.
 
Off the coast in the lower left we can see a group of three coral reefs, known as the Rowley Shoals. Located on the edge of one of the world’s widest continental shelves, each atoll covers an area of 80–90 sq km including lagoons.

Near the centre of the image is King Sound – a large gulf measuring about 120 km long and 50 km wide. A handful of rivers empties into the sound such as the Fitzroy River, one of Australia’s largest watercourses. The port town of Derby lies near the mouth of this river.

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMEAF4S18H_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 10/26/2012 08:16 am
Earth from Space: Persian coast

26 October 2012
This image acquired over the Middle East shows the northern end of the Persian Gulf, along with the border of Iran and Iraq and the mouth of the Shatt al-Arab river.
 
The main part of the image covers Iran’s southern Khuzestan Province on the Persian Gulf.

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMMCJMFL8H_index_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 11/02/2012 03:40 pm
Earth from Space: Aphrodite’s island

2 November 2012

Covering part of the Eastern Mediterranean this Envisat image is dominated by the island of Cyprus, a former British colony that became independent in 1960.
 
The island was shaped from the collision of the African and European tectonic plates. It is located on the Anatolian plate and therefore belongs geologically to Asia.

http://www.esa.int/SPECIALS/Envisat/SEMXSM52Q8H_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 11/16/2012 03:48 pm
Earth from Space: Mountains of hunger

16 November 2012

The Tibesti Mountains, located mostly in Chad with the northern slopes extending into Libya, are captured in this Envisat image.

http://www.esa.int/SPECIALS/Envisat/SEM11JGPI9H_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 11/23/2012 08:13 am
Earth from Space: Mediterranean pearls
 
23 November 2012

This Envisat image shows the island of Elba off Italy’s north western coast. To the east is the Italian mainland and region of Tuscany, while the small island of Pianosa is visible in the lower-left corner.
 
According to legend, the islands of the Tuscan Archipelago appeared when Venus, the goddess of love and beauty, emerged from the sea. Seven pearls slipped from her neck, forming the seven islands of the archipelago.

http://www.esa.int/SPECIALS/Envisat/SEMOMS91M9H_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 11/30/2012 08:39 am
Earth from Space: Snowy Siberia

30 November 2012

North central Siberia is pictured in this Envisat image from 5 March 2012. An enormous area in north Asia, Siberia spreads from the Urals in the west to the Okhotsk Sea in the east, from the Arctic Ocean in the north to the borders of Kazakhstan, Mongolia and China in the south.

http://www.esa.int/SPECIALS/Envisat/SEMA0DEQZ9H_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 11/30/2012 03:20 pm
RELEASE: 12-410

NEW "EARTH AS ART" BOOK ILLUSTRATES BEAUTY OF SATELLITE VIEWS



WASHINGTON -- A stunning array of images of our home planet, taken by
Earth-observing science satellites, are featured in a new NASA
publication. The book, "Earth as Art," is available in hardcover,
electronically, and as a free iPad application.

The 158-page book celebrates the aesthetic beauty of Earth in the
patterns, shapes, colors and textures of the land, oceans, ice and
atmosphere. Images include snow-capped mountain peaks in the
Himalayas, Arizona's Painted Desert, the Mississippi River Delta
spreading into the Gulf of Mexico, a Saharan dune sea in Algeria, and
Byrd Glacier in Antarctica.

"Earth as Art" features images from the Landsat 5 and 7, Terra, Aqua,
and Earth Observing-1 (EO-1) satellites. All are among a fleet of
U.S. environmental satellites used for scientific research and
applied purposes. Instruments on these satellites measure light
outside of the visible range. The images produced from these data
reveal features and patterns not always visible to the naked eye. The
Terra, Aqua, and EO-1 satellites are managed by NASA. Landsat
satellites are managed by the U.S. Geological Survey.

The iPad version of "Earth as Art" allows users to zoom into the
book's 75 satellite images and access additional information on
selected features and the satellites used. The app can be downloaded
by visiting:

http://www.nasa.gov/apps

"Earth as Art" is available for purchase from the U.S. Government
Printing Office online at:

http://bookstore.gpo.gov

A free ebook version of "Earth as Art" in PDF format may be downloaded
by visiting:

http://www.nasa.gov/connect/ebooks/earth_art_detail.html

For more information about NASA's science program, visit:


http://www.nasa.gov/earth
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 12/05/2012 06:33 pm
RELEASE: 12-422

NASA-NOAA SATELLITE REVEALS NEW VIEWS OF EARTH AT NIGHT

WASHINGTON -- Scientists unveiled today an unprecedented new look at
our planet at night. A global composite image, constructed using
cloud-free night images from a new NASA and National Oceanic and
Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) satellite, shows the glow of
natural and human-built phenomena across the planet in greater detail
than ever before.

Many satellites are equipped to look at Earth during the day, when
they can observe our planet fully illuminated by the sun. With a new
sensor onboard the NASA-NOAA Suomi National Polar-orbiting
Partnership (NPP) satellite launched last year, scientists now can
observe Earth's atmosphere and surface during nighttime hours.

The new sensor, the day-night band of the Visible Infrared Imaging
Radiometer Suite (VIIRS), is sensitive enough to detect the nocturnal
glow produced by Earth's atmosphere and the light from a single ship
in the sea. Satellites in the U.S. Defense Meteorological Satellite
Program have been making observations with low-light sensors for 40
years. But the VIIRS day-night band can better detect and resolve
Earth's night lights.

The new, higher resolution composite image of Earth at night was
released at a news conference at the American Geophysical Union
meeting in San Francisco. This and other VIIRS day-night band images
are providing researchers with valuable data for a wide variety of
previously unseen or poorly seen events.

"For all the reasons that we need to see Earth during the day, we also
need to see Earth at night," said Steve Miller, a researcher at
NOAA's Colorado State University Cooperative Institute for Research
in the Atmosphere. "Unlike humans, the Earth never sleeps."

The day-night band observed Hurricane Sandy, illuminated by moonlight,
making landfall over New Jersey on the evening of Oct. 29. Night
images showed the widespread power outages that left millions in
darkness in the wake of the storm. With its night view, VIIRS is able
to detect a more complete view of storms and other weather
conditions, such as fog, that are difficult to discern with infrared,
or thermal, sensors. Night is also when many types of clouds begin to
form.

"The use of the day-night band by the National Weather Service is
growing," said Mitch Goldberg, program scientist for NOAA's Joint
Polar Satellite System. For example, the NOAA Weather Service's
forecast office in Monterey, Calif., is now using VIIRS day-night
band images to improve monitoring and forecasting of fog and low
clouds for high air traffic coastal airports like San Francisco.
According to Goldberg, VIIRS images were used on Nov. 26, the Monday
after Thanksgiving, to map the dense fog in the San Francisco Bay
area that resulted in flight delays and cancellations.

Unlike a camera that captures a picture in one exposure, the day-night
band produces an image by repeatedly scanning a scene and resolving
it as millions of individual pixels. Then, the day-night band reviews
the amount of light in each pixel. If it is very bright, a low-gain
mode prevents the pixel from oversaturating. If the pixel is very
dark, the signal is amplified.

"It's like having three simultaneous low-light cameras operating at
once and we pick the best of various cameras, depending on where
we're looking in the scene," Miller said. The instrument can capture
images on nights with or without moonlight, producing crisp views of
Earth's atmosphere, land and ocean surfaces.

"The night is nowhere as dark as we might think," Miller said. And
with the VIIRS day-night band helping scientists to tease out
information from human and natural sources of nighttime light, "we
don't have to be in the dark anymore, either."

"The remarkable day-night band images from Suomi NPP have impressed
the scientific community and exceeded our pre-launch expectations,"
said James Gleason, Suomi NPP project scientist at NASA's Goddard
Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md.

For images and additional information, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/NPP/news/earth-at-night.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 12/07/2012 01:12 pm
Earth from Space: Yellow River, Sea and sand
 
7 December 2012

Northern China is pictured is this week’s image from the Envisat satellite. The North China Plain dominates the image, bordered on the north and west by mountains, with the Yellow Sea to the east.

http://www.esa.int/SPECIALS/Envisat/SEMLE13ABAH_0.html
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: akula2 on 12/08/2012 01:48 pm
NASA Goddard Earth Blue Marble photo. Most of Asia and Australia illuminating. This is my Desktop pic.
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: akula2 on 12/10/2012 08:01 pm
NASA Goddard Earth Blue Marble photo.This one really stumped me. Flat Earth looks so sublime. I've kept it as wall paper on my MacBook Pro so that every time it should remind me the fact that 7+ billion are living on our planet :)
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: JohnFornaro on 12/10/2012 10:02 pm
Earth from Space: Downtown Dubai
 
12 October 2012

This image from the Pleiades satellite shows part of Dubai in the United Arab Emirates.
http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMVS63S18H_index_0.html

Dubai almost looks like Sim City!
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 12/14/2012 09:14 pm
Earth from Space: Po

14 December 2012

 This image shows the Po River, which flows over 650 km from west to east across northern Italy as the country’s longest river.


 http://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Observing_the_Earth/Earth_from_Space_Po
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 12/22/2012 01:48 pm
Earth from Space: Water and ice
 
21 December 2012

The Kangerdlugssuaq glacier and its ice stream are pictured in this week’s image.
 
It is the largest outlet glacier on Greenland’s east coast, discharging ice into the surrounding oceans. In this image we can see hundreds of icebergs speckling the water.
 
Greenland is home to one of only two ice sheets on Earth – the other in Antarctica – and is the world’s largest island.
 
http://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Observing_the_Earth/Earth_from_Space_Water_and_ice
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 01/11/2013 01:30 pm
A rare cloud-free view of Ireland, Great Britain and northern France

http://spaceinimages.esa.int/Images/2013/01/A_rare_cloud-free_view_of_Ireland_Great_Britain_and_northern_France
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 01/19/2013 07:24 am
Earth from Space: The Bay Area
 
18 January 2013

This image, acquired by Landsat-7 on 2 January, shows the San Francisco Bay Area in the US state of California.
The bay is actually an estuary, where waters from the Sacramento and San Joaquin rivers meet the Pacific Ocean.

http://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Observing_the_Earth/Earth_from_Space_The_Bay_Area
 
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 01/25/2013 11:30 am
Earth from Space: Gateway to the Arctic
 
25 January 2013

 This Envisat image from 19 March 2012 shows the elongated islands of the Novaya Zemlya archipelago on the left, the mainland of northwestern Russia to the right and an ice-covered Kara Sea in the centre.

http://spaceinimages.esa.int/Images/2013/01/Novaya_Zemlya_archipelago_Arctic_Circle
 
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 01/28/2013 09:04 pm
Bonus image:

Costa Concordia one year after....
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: Ares67 on 01/28/2013 09:09 pm
Bonus image:

Costa Concordia one year after....

Wow! Amazing details!
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 02/02/2013 11:05 am
Earth From Space: Scandinavian snows

In this image from the Envisat satellite, clouds cover the North Sea and sweep down to the strait between Denmark (lower-right corner) and Norway (upper-centre). In the upper-right corner, a thicker blanket of clouds covers south eastern Norway and spreads into Sweden. Located on the Scandinavian Peninsula, Norway is Europe’s northernmost country and is famed for its fjords. Some of these are visible in the image as dark lines between the white and snow-covered land. Near the top of the image, we can see part of Norway’s longest and deepest fjord, the Sognefjord. In the lower-right corner, we can see part of Denmark’s Jutland peninsula, with small and large bodies of water speckling the flat terrain.
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 02/09/2013 12:29 pm
Earth from Space: Canyon country
 
8 February 2013
 
This Landsat image from 19 July 2011 shows Lake Powell, a reservoir on the Colorado River in the southwestern United States.
 
Straddling the border of the states Utah (to the north) and Arizona (to the south), it is the second largest artificial lake in the country.
 

http://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Observing_the_Earth/Earth_from_Space_Canyon_country
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 02/16/2013 07:14 am
Earth from Space: Ocean link
 
15 February 2013

Central Panama and its 80 km-long ship canal that connects the Atlantic – via the Caribbean Sea – and Pacific Oceans are pictured in this Envisat image.
 
Completed in 1914, the Panama Canal is one of the greatest engineering projects of the last century. ‘Locks’ at either end of the waterway are used to lift entering ships up to the canal’s level of 26 m, and lower them to sea level as they exit.
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 02/22/2013 02:32 pm
Earth from Space: Cotmeana
 
22 February 2013

Korea’s Kompsat-2 satellite captured this image of southern central Romania in January.
The area pictured is part of a geographic transitional region between the Southern Carpathians to the north and the lowland plains to the south.
Bucharest is some 110 km to the southeast, Bulgaria is about 120 km to the south, and Serbia about 160 km to the west.
 
http://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Observing_the_Earth/Earth_from_Space_Cotmeana
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: Art LeBrun on 02/22/2013 02:52 pm
Earth from Space: Ocean link
 
15 February 2013

Central Panama and its 80 km-long ship canal that connects the Atlantic – via the Caribbean Sea – and Pacific Oceans are pictured in this Envisat image.
 
Completed in 1914, the Panama Canal is one of the greatest engineering projects of the last century. ‘Locks’ at either end of the waterway are used to lift entering ships up to the canal’s level of 26 m, and lower them to sea level as they exit.

All the water filling and draining of the lock chambers is done by gravity.
Trivia of the day.
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 03/03/2013 07:42 am
Earth from Space: New Caledonia
 
1 March 2013

The New Caledonia archipelago, 1210 km east of Australia, is captured in this Envisat image.
 
Caledonia was the Roman name for today’s northern Scotland. When British explorer James Cook saw the archipelago’s main island in the 1770s, he named it ‘New Caledonia’ because of the similarities he noticed between the Scottish highlands and the island’s terrain.
 
http://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Observing_the_Earth/Earth_from_Space_New_Caledonia2
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 03/08/2013 03:56 pm
Earth from Space: Delta’s edge
 
8 March 2013
 
This animation shows before-and-after satellite images over two harvest seasons in 2012 in the eastern Nile Delta.
 
Located in northern Egypt, the delta is where the Nile River splits and empties into the Mediterranean Sea. Important crops grown in this rich agricultural area include cotton, rice and sugar cane.
 
http://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Observing_the_Earth/Earth_from_Space_Delta_s_edge
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 03/16/2013 08:17 am
Earth from Space: Corse island
 
15 March 2013

This Envisat composite image shows the French island of Corsica, one of the largest islands in the Mediterranean Sea.
 
Corsica is located just 90 km west of Italy, and 170 km south of France. Sardinia is just to the south across the Strait of Bonifacio, and we can see a couple of Sardinian islands along the bottom of the image.

 http://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Observing_the_Earth/Earth_from_Space_Corse_island
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 03/23/2013 08:19 am
Earth from Space: Nhamundá
 
22 March 2013

Part of the Amazon Basin in northern Brazil is pictured in this image from the Japanese ALOS satellite.
 
Along the left side of the image and running along the bottom, the Nhamundá River creates the border between the Brazilian states of Pará (north) and Amazonas (south). Small patches of land and vegetation outline the river’s main route, though the surrounding area is also covered by water.

http://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Observing_the_Earth/Earth_from_Space_Nhamunda
 
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 04/19/2013 02:06 pm
Earth From Space: Équateur

An area in the north-west of the Democratic Republic of Congo is pictured in this image taken on 26 June 2011 by the French SPOT-4 satellite. Most of the lighter green areas are deforested, while the darker green are areas of dense – and possibly natural – vegetation. The lines cutting through the image are roads, many with structures built along them. Clusters of purple dots are larger settlements. A river snakes through the upper part of the image and below it there appears to be a square in light green. Judging by the precision of the outline, we can deduce that this is a patch of land that was either intentionally spared from deforestation or has been reforested.


Credits: CNES/Spot Image/ESA

http://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Observing_the_Earth/Earth_from_Space_Equateur
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 05/06/2013 08:15 am

Earth from Space: East meets West
 
3 May 2013

 Istanbul and the surrounding area in northwestern Turkey are captured in this Envisat image. To the north is the Black Sea, which connects to the Sea of Marmara (centre) via the Bosphorus strait. The Dardanelles strait connects the Marmara to the Aegean Sea (lower left corner).
 
Turkey is a Eurasian country with the majority of its territory in southwestern Asia and a small portion in the Balkan region of southeastern Europe.

http://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Observing_the_Earth/Earth_from_Space_East_meets_West
 
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 05/10/2013 09:56 am
Earth from Space: Dune 45
 
10 May 2013

 Korea’s Kompsat-2 satellite captured this image over the sand seas of the Namib Desert on 7 January 2012.
 
The Namib is the oldest desert in the world, stretching over 2000 km along Africa’s southwestern coast from Angola, through Namibia to South Africa. Sand dunes dominate the desert – some reaching over 300 m in height.


 http://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Observing_the_Earth/Earth_from_Space_Dune_45
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 05/24/2013 05:11 pm
Earth from Space: Kazakh treasure
 
24 May 2013
 This Kompsat-2 image was acquired over southwestern Kazakhstan’s Mangistau region east of the Caspian Sea.
 
Along the top of the image we can see water and wetlands, with eroded areas at the top and on the right. The majority of the image is dominated by flatland covered with low-lying vegetation.
 
http://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Observing_the_Earth/Earth_from_Space_Kazakh_treasure
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 06/07/2013 08:25 am

Earth from Space: Thirsty land
 
7 June 2013

 In this week’s image, we see where southwestern Africa’s Okavango River empties into the inland Okavango Delta in northern Botswana.
 
This area is a popular tourist destination where visitors can catch a glimpse of a variety of wildlife such as elephant, buffalo, wildebeest, giraffe, lion, hyena and rhinoceros.
 
The delta is fed by the Okavango River, which originates in Angola, forms part of the Angola Namibia border and then ends in northern Botswana. Here, it has formed a depression in the semi-arid Kalahari basin.

http://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Observing_the_Earth/Earth_from_Space_Thirsty_land
 
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 06/16/2013 10:05 am

Earth from Space: South Island
 
14 June 2013

 New Zealand’s South Island is pictured in this Envisat image from 4 April 2012.
 
Located in the southwest Pacific Ocean, New Zealand sits on two tectonic plates: the Pacific and the Australian. The country therefore experiences a lot of geological activity. In February 2011, an earthquake shook South Island and killed over 180 people, making it one of the nation’s deadliest disasters.
 
In addition to earthquakes, the country’s position on two plates yields many geothermal features like geysers and hot springs.

http://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Observing_the_Earth/Earth_from_Space_South_Island2
 
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 06/22/2013 04:40 pm
Earth from Space: Ports of Barcelona

21 June 2013

On the north east coast of the Iberian Peninsula, the Spanish city of Barcelona is pictured in this image from Japan’s ALOS satellite. 

Near the top right corner, the circular Plaça de les Glòries Catalanes was meant to be the city centre in the original urban plan. The avenue, Avinguda Diagonal, cuts through this square and the city.

The Collserola mountain range rises above Barcelona to the north. Here, over 80 sq km of preserved parkland is home to varied wildlife such as wild boar, badger, rabbit, woodpeckers, rat-catching eagles, green tree frogs and turtles.

http://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Observing_the_Earth/Earth_from_Space_Ports_of_Barcelona
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 07/05/2013 02:27 pm
Earth from Space: Peruvian landscape

5 July 2013

The foothills of the Andes mountains near the southern coast of Peru are captured by the Kompsat-2 satellite.

The Andes stretch about 7000 km from Venezuela down South America’s west coast to the top of Argentina. The mountain rage is the result of the Nazca and Antarctic tectonic plates moving under the South American plate – a geological process called ‘subduction’. This process is also responsible for the Andes range’s volcanic activity.

http://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Observing_the_Earth/Earth_from_Space_Peruvian_landscape
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: ClaytonBirchenough on 07/07/2013 12:40 am
Wow! Just been browsing through this images and they are awe inspiring! Thanks a lot jacqmans!
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 07/14/2013 12:19 pm

Earth from Space: Raystown Ray

12 July 2013

This Envisat radar image is centred on the man-made Raystown Lake in the US state of Pennsylvania.

The lake is a popular place for camping, biking, hiking, boating, fishing and other water activities.

Some believe that this lake is home to a Loch Ness Monster-like creature – ‘Raystown Ray’. There are stories of boaters seeing large, dark objects just below the water’s surface, and some even claim to have seen a head and long neck emerge from the water.

http://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Observing_the_Earth/Earth_from_Space_Raystown_Ray
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 09/17/2013 03:30 pm
http://image-cnes.fr/non-classe/redressement-du-costa-concordia-observe-depuis-lespace/
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: bunker9603 on 09/18/2013 03:20 am
Beautiful images...Thank you for taking the time to post them!
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 09/21/2013 07:26 am

Earth from Space: Sahara oasis

20 September 2013
Deep in the Sahara Desert, the Al Jawf oasis in southeastern Libya is pictured in this image from Japan’s ALOS satellite.

The city can be seen in in the upper left corner, while large, irrigated agricultural plots appear like Braille across the image. Between the city and the plots we can see the two parallel runways of the Kufra Airport.

http://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Observing_the_Earth/Earth_from_Space_Sahara_oasis
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 09/28/2013 02:59 pm
This image was taken on 4 January 2013 over central Athens, the capital and largest city of Greece. Near the centre of the image is the famous Acropolis of Athens – standing high about the surrounding city as evident by the shadow to the north. Nearby to the southeast is the Temple of Zeus, with shadows from the remaining standing columns stretching across the grass. Further northeast are the National Gardens surrounding the Zappeion building. At the upper left corner of the gardens is the Greek parliament building overlooking Syntagma Square. In the lower-right corner we can see the large, white marble Panathenaic Stadium.
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 10/07/2013 11:07 am
Fair weather clouds over the Netherlands.
Taken on July 18, 2013
Credit: ESA/NASA
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 12/06/2013 09:27 am
Twin volcanic plumes – one ash, one gas – from Sicily’s Mt Etna. This image was acquired on 26 October 2013 by the Proba-V minisatellite.

Less than seven months after launch, Earth-watcher Proba-V is ready to provide global vegetation data for operational and scientific use.

Launched by a Vega rocket from French Guiana in the early hours of 7 May, the Proba-V miniaturised satellite is designed to map land cover and vegetation growth across the entire planet every two days at a resolution of 330 m. Read more: www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Observing_the_Earth/Proba-V/Pr...

Credit: ESA/BELSPO
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 03/12/2014 08:40 am
EAC from Space Station

Astronauts on the International Space Station often spend free time gazing at Earth. The outpost orbits our planet at around 400 km altitude, offering unique views. The European-built Cupola module has a 360º bay window to monitor approaching spacecraft but it also provides breathtaking vistas.

This image was taken on 4 March 2014 and shows a cloud-free view of the Rhine river winding towards Cologne on the left. The astronaut who took this picture might have recognised ESA’s European Astronaut Centre situated at the DLR German Aerospace Center site below Cologne-Bonn Airport. All Station astronauts train there on European experiments and systems before they leave Earth on their mission.

Credit: NASA
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 04/25/2014 11:45 am
Randstad, The Netherlands
 
Bright lights characterise the west of The Netherlands seen from the International Space Station at night.

Many people live closely together in the largest cities of the Netherlands visible in this picture: Amsterdam, Utrecht, Rotterdam and Den Haag. The area is so densely populated and the cities so close to each other that the urbanized area as a whole is often called the Randstad. All these houses and streetlights give off much light.

In addition The Netherlands has a large agricultural industry based in the Westland. Many flowers and vegetables grown in the Northern hemisphere are cultivated in greenhouses under artificial light. The large greenhouses in the Westland are illuminated at night and the light to make the plants grow is so bright it can be seen 400 km above Earth.

Lastly the Randstad is a transport hub. At the bottom of this image is Rotterdam that lies along the Rhine river flowing west to Hoek van Holland on the left. All along the river are large container ports and industrial refineries. At the northern end of the Randstad lies Amsterdam with its river, the Amstel flowing towards Ijmuiden. It too has industrial ports with a bright steel refinery in Ijmuiden visible as the top-most orange glow. Just to the southwest of Amsterdam is the brightly-lit Schiphol Airport with the runways clearly defined in black surrounded by the runway lights for pilots and parking lights for travellers.

This image was taken by ESA astronaut André Kuipers during his Promisse mission in 2012. André was born and raised in Amsterdam.

Credit: ESA/NASA
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 05/02/2014 12:37 pm
Ciudad Juarez and El Paso
 
The Mexican-American border separates the cities of Ciudad Juarez, Mexico with El Paso in Texas, USA. This image shows both cities at night, as pictured by an astronaut on the International Space Station circling Earth at around 400 km above.

From space, political borders are not visible but subtle differences in street-lighting can be revealing. In this image the international border between the cities is brightly-lit corresponding to the thick yellow line dividing the mass of lights. North of the border is El Paso with its well-illuminated major motorways such as the straight US Route 180 leading to the east. Just to the north of El Paso is Biggs Army Airfield that shows up as remarkably different to the residential areas and city centre of the town.

The city of Ciudad Juarez shows a different layout to its US sister city. Juarez is more densely illuminated and roads stand out less visibly. One exception is the ring road Periférico Carmino Real that seems to be partly illuminated by distinctive white-coloured streetlamps.

These night-time images of Earth from space clearly show the impact human settlement has on our planet. The light seen by astronauts is all wasted energy that could be better used for other purposes.


Credit: ESA/NASA
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 05/31/2014 10:12 am
Lake Constance
 
The freshwater Lake Constance in Central Europe is pictured in this image from the Sentinel-1A satellite.

Formed by the Rhine Glacier during the last Ice Age, it covers an area of about 540 sq km and is an important source of drinking water for southwestern Germany.

The lake has shorelines in three countries: Germany to the north, Switzerland to the south and Austria at its eastern end. Over the water body, however, there are no borders because there is no legally binding agreement on where they lie.

In the lower-right, we can see where the Rhine river flows into the lake from the south, which then flows out of the lake to the west (left). This and other rivers carry sediments from the Alps, extending the coastline and decreasing the lake’s water depth.

The runways of Germany’s Friedrichshafen Airport are visible in the right section of the image. The Aviation & Aerospace Museum is nearby.

This image was acquired on 10 May in ‘interferometric wide swath mode’ and in dual polarisation.

The radar instrument gathers information in either horizontal or vertical radar pulses, and colours were assigned to the different types. In this image, buildings generally appear pink, while vegetation is green. Areas with lowest reflectivity in all polarisations appear very dark, like the water.

Sentinel-1A’s radar is still being calibrated following its 3 April 2014 launch, but early images like this give us a glimpse of the kind of operational imagery that this mission will provide for Europe’s Copernicus environmental monitoring programme.

Credit: ESA
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 06/05/2014 09:43 am
Springtime in Europe
 
This image of Europe is a composite of Proba-V images from 1–10 May 2014. Launched just over a year ago, the washing machine-sized satellite carries the Vegetation imager designed after the French Spot-Vegetation mission, flown on the Spot-4 and Spot-5 satellites.
Spot-Vegetation marked 16 years of service in May, and has now passed the torch to its European counterpart.
Proba-V maps land cover and vegetation growth across the entire planet every two days. The data can also be used for day-by-day tracking of extreme weather, alerting authorities to crop failures, monitoring inland water resources and tracing the steady spread of deserts and deforestation.
Credit: ESA/VITO
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 11/07/2014 08:32 am
Dead Sea, Middle East 

This image from the Landsat-8 satellite brings us over part of the Middle East, with the Jordan Rift Valley running north to south.

The most prominent feature in this image is the Dead Sea: the lowest point on Earth’s surface, more than 420 m below sea level. The extremely high salinity means fish cannot live in this water body, although there are bacteria and fungi.

With the Jordan River as its main source of water, the Dead Sea is an ‘endorheic’ basin, meaning that the water has no outflow. Nonetheless, the water level has been dropping, an effect of the diversion of incoming water from the river.

Note the greenish rectangles just south of the Sea. This is a large complex of mineral evaporation ponds used to produce sodium chloride and other salts for the chemical industry and human and animal consumption. These ponds are separated from the northern part of the Dead Sea by what once was the Lisan Peninsula but lowering water levels have exposed the sea bed, dividing the two sections completely.

Throughout the rest of the image we can see built-up areas such as Amman, the capital of Jordan, in the upper right and Jerusalem near the green hills west of the Dead Sea. Further west we can see green patches of agriculture on the coastal plain, with Tel Aviv on the Mediterranean coast.

In the lower-left corner of the image, we can clearly see the division between Israel and the Gaza Strip not only by the outline of the border, but in the difference in agricultural practices.

This Landsat-8 image, acquired on 4 July 2013, is featured on the Earth from Space video programme.

Through ESA’s Landsat-8 portal, registered users can access data from the mission over Europe within three hours of acquisition.

Credit: USGS/ESA
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 05/22/2015 09:46 am
Cambodian rivers
 
A flooded landscape in Cambodia between the Mekong River (right) and Tonlé Sap river (left) is pictured by Japan’s ALOS satellite. The centre of this image is about 30 km north of the centre of the country’s capital, Phnom Penh.

Originating on the Tibetan Plateau and passing through six countries before emptying into the South China Sea, the 4350 km-long Mekong is the single largest source of protein for communities in its basin. Tens of millions of people rely on the river for fishing, while agriculture is intensive along parts its course.

The river on the left, the Tonlé Sap, changes flow direction seasonally. During the dry season from November to May it flows south, draining into the Mekong at Phnom Penh. The direction changes during the wet season, causing a rise in water levels in the surrounding floodplains and forming a large lake further north (not pictured).

This image, also featured on the Earth from Space video programme www.esa.int/spaceinvideos/Videos/2015/05/Earth_from_Space..., was captured by the AVNIR-2 instrument on Japan’s ALOS satellite on 5 December 2009.

This is just one of about 50 satellite images on display at the National Museum of Science and Technology in Milan, Italy.

As part of the ‘My Planet from Space: Fragility and Beauty’ exhibition, the collection takes you on a journey to some of the most beautiful and remote places on Earth. The exhibition has been organised to coincide with the Expo 2015, with a focus on agriculture to highlight the Expo’s theme of ‘Feeding the Planet, Energy for Life’.

Credit: JAXA/ESA
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 06/05/2015 10:02 am
Tianjin, China
 
The Chinese city of Tianjin is captured in this Sentinel-1A radar image created by combining three scans over several months.

The city sits to the west of the Bohai Bay within the Bohai Gulf, off of the Yellow Sea. With a population of over 14 million people, this megacity is among China’s five largest.

Urban areas are home to over half of the world’s population, and are rapidly changing environments. As more people move from rural areas to cities, this growth needs to be monitored to help it proceed on a sustainable basis.

High-resolution satellite data provide essential information for city planning and for the sustainable development of urban regions. Radar in particular can be used to monitor slight ground movements down to a few millimetres – valuable information for urban planners and for risk assessment.

Zooming in on the upper right, we can see different colours in the geometric agricultural fields, showing changes between the three acquisitions (22 October 2014, 14 January 2015 and 7 February 2015) that make up this image.

In this area, the black shapes show divided areas covered in water, which are possibly shrimp or fish farms. Bohai Bay was traditionally home to the country’s richest fisheries, but pollution, overfishing and land reclamation has diminished this economic activity.

Farther south, we can see numerous dots in the water – radar reflections from the boats coming to and from the Port of Tianjin. This massive maritime gateway handles hundreds of millions of tonnes of cargo each year, and is the largest in northern China.

On the central-left side of the image, the black and bright green areas are water reservoirs. The upcoming Sentinel-2 mission – set for launch on 22 June – will be used to support the sustainable management of water resources by providing measurements of water quality and detecting changes.

This image is also featured on the Earth from Space video programme www.esa.int/spaceinvideos/Videos/2015/06/Earth_from_Space...

Credit: Copernicus data (2014/2015)/ESA
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 06/19/2015 01:05 pm
San Francisco Bay Area, USA
 
The Landsat-8 satellite captured this image of the San Francisco Bay Area in the US state of California on 5 March 2015.

The city of San Francisco is on a peninsula in the centre left section of the image. In the upper-central portion, we can see the delta of the Sacramento and San Joaquin rivers with brown, sediment-filled water flowing down into the larger bay.

Starting in the top-left corner of the image and running diagonally to the south is the San Andreas Fault. This is the border between the North American and the Pacific tectonic plates, and is responsible for the high earthquake risk in the area.

Zooming in, we can see that some basins running along the fault are filled with water. In the extreme upper left, Tomales Bay formed along a submerged part of the fault, with its northern reaches opening onto the Pacific coast (not visible). Near the centre of the image, a number of water reservoirs are situated in the fault, providing water for the public.

Differences in land cover are obvious in this image. Surrounding the Bay we can see densely populated urban areas in white/grey, while forests and park areas appear in shades of green. In the upper-right corner, we can see geometric shapes of large-scale agriculture, with fields in different colours depending on the vegetation type.

Distinguishing between different types of land cover is an important task for Earth-observing satellites, helping us to understand the landscape, map how it is used and monitor changes over time.

On 23 June, the first satellite in the Sentinel-2 mission will be launched, and will provide such information on land cover on a global scale. In addition, it will determine various plant indices such as leaf area chlorophyll and water content indexes. This is particularly important for effective yield prediction and applications related to Earth’s vegetation.

With its multispectral imager and wide swath coverage, the Sentinel-2 mission not only offers continuity, but also expands on the Landsat missions – which provided this image.

Credit: USGS/ESA
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 07/10/2015 10:29 am
Central Algeria
 
The sandy and rocky terrain of the Sahara desert in central Algeria was captured in this image by the Sentinel-2A satellite.

The largest country in Africa, more than 90% of Algeria is covered by the Sahara desert. Major oil and natural gas deposits lie beneath the Sahara, contributing to Algeria’s position as one of the wealthiest African nations.

In its entirety, the Sahara stretches from the Atlantic Ocean to the Red Sea and is centred on the Tropic of Cancer. It is the world’s largest hot desert, covering an area of about 9 million sq km over parts of Algeria, Chad, Egypt, Libya, Mali, Mauritania, Morocco, Niger, Tunisia and Sudan.

The area pictured here is about 90 km south of the El Ménia oasis – also known as El Goléa – in Algeria’s Ghardaïa province.

Running north to south just left of the large sand dune at the centre, we can see a road that connects El Ménia to Ain Salah to the south, which was once an important link on the trans-Saharan trade route.

The heat and lack of water render vast desert areas highly unwelcoming, making satellites the best way to observe these environments on a large scale. In addition, optical imagery of deserts from space is arguably the most fascinating: the diversity and untouched state of these landscapes produce unique and striking scenes.

Sentinel-2A was launched on 23 June from Europe’s Spaceport in French Guiana. Although the satellite’s multispectral imager is still being calibrated, it delivered a spectacular first scan of Earth on 27 June, which included the area pictured here.

While providing detailed information about Earth’s vegetation, the Sentinel-2 mission will play a key role in mapping differences in land cover to understand the landscape, map how it is used and monitor changes over time.

It will also provide measurements of water quality and detect changes in water bodies, supporting the sustainable management of water resources – an invaluable tool for arid areas where water is scarce.

This image is featured on the Earth from Space video programme.

Credit: Copernicus Sentinel data (2015)/ESA
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 07/17/2015 02:49 pm
New York City
 
This satellite image covers part of New York City, including the island of Manhattan at the centre, the Brooklyn and Queens boroughs on the right and the Bronx along the top-right.

Staten Island is visible in the lower left, while the upper left side of the image is dominated by part of New Jersey.

With over 8 million inhabitants on a limited amount of land, New York City is one of the most densely populated cities in the United States. The city has a long history of land reclamation, most notably on the southwestern tip of Manhattan. This area was once part of the Hudson River before rock excavated during major construction projects and sand dredged from the harbour were used to create the area known as Battery Park City today.

With the populations growing across the world’s cities, apart from building vertically, land reclamation is a common practice for meeting habitation and agricultural needs, among other uses.

Of the city’s five boroughs, Manhattan is the most densely populated. The island is flanked by the Hudson and East rivers and, from our satellite perspective, the 340 hectares of Central Park at its centre is a prominent feature.

Located southeast of the park is the UN Headquarters, which is currently hosting the ‘My Planet from Space’ exhibition.

Produced by ESA and realised with the UN Office for Outer Space Affairs, the collection of satellite images takes you on a journey to some of the most beautiful and remote places on Earth. From melting glaciers to deforested rainforests to expanding urban sprawl, the images highlight the importance of spaceborne technology in the management and protection of natural resources and the global environment.

The exhibition runs 9 July to 9 September in the Visitors’ Lobby at the UN Headquarters General Assembly Building on 1st Avenue at 46th St. Entrance is free of charge.

This image, also featured on the Earth from Space video programme, was captured by Japan’s ALOS satellite on 18 June 2010.

Credit: JAXA/ESA
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 07/29/2015 02:16 pm
Vesuvius
 
Mount Vesuvius and part of the Bay of Naples is shown in this image taken on 8 July 2015. Although Vesuvius has not erupted since 1944, Sentinel-2A’s image of eruptions will contribute to disaster mapping.

Credit: Copernicus Sentinel data (2015)/ESA
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 10/16/2015 08:54 am
Deep blue Red Sea reefs
 
This beautiful true-colour image features the Red Sea coral reefs off the coast of Saudi Arabia.
 
This vast, desolate area in the very northern corner of the Red Sea is bordered by the Hejaz Mountains to the east. The area was once criss-crossed by ancient trade routes that played a vital role in the development of many of the region’s greatest civilisations.
 
Today, the Red Sea separates the coasts of Egypt, Sudan and Eritrea to the west from those of Saudi Arabia and Yemen to the east.
 
It contains some of the world’s warmest and saltiest seawater. With hot sunny days and the lack of any significant rainfall, dust storms from the surrounding deserts frequently sweep across the sea. This hot dry climate causes high levels of evaporation from the sea, which leads to the Red Sea’s high salinity.
 
It is just over 300 km across at its widest point, about 1900 km long and up to 2600 m deep. Much of the immediate shoreline is quite shallow, dotted with coral reefs along most of the coast – making excellent diving spots in many areas.
 
Its name derives from the colour changes in the waters. Normally, the Red Sea is an intense blue–green. Occasionally, however, extensive algae blooms form and when they die off they turn the sea a reddish-brown colour.
 
The Red Sea lies in a fault separating two blocks of Earth’s crust – the Arabian and African plates.
 
Navigation in the Red Sea is difficult. The shorelines in the northern half provide some natural harbours, but the growth of coral reefs has restricted navigable channels and blocked some harbour facilities.
 
Shallow submarine shelves and extensive fringing reef systems rim most of the Red Sea, by far the dominant reef type found here.
 
The lighter blue water depicted in the image means that the water is shallower than the surrounding darker blue water.
 
Furthermore, water clarity is exceptional in the Red Sea because of the lack of river discharge and low rainfall. Therefore, fine sediment that typically plagues other tropical oceans, particularly after large storms, does not affect the Red Sea reefs.
 
Also featured on the Earth from Space video programme, this image was captured by Sentinel-2A on 28 June 2015 after its instruments had been activated.
 
Credit: Copernicus Sentinel data (2015)/ESA
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 10/22/2015 01:06 pm
Kilimanjaro, Tanzania
 
A view of the glacier atop Africa’s highest peak, as observed by ESA’s Proba-V minisatellite.
 
The dormant volcano known as Mount Kilimanjaro is Africa’s highest mountain, at 5895 m. It is also the tallest free-standing mountain in the world, rising about 900 m above its surrounding plain.
 
Located close to the equator at 3°S, only its summit is covered with snow and ice. The ascent towards the top is a journey through most of the world’s climate zones, from the tropical to the Arctic. On the way the landscape shifts from tropical rain forest to moorland, alpine heather to desert and finally snow and ice.
 
This 100 m-resolution false-colour image from Proba-V’s main Vegetation camera on 14 June 2015 shows Kilimanjaro enveloped by clouds to the south and north. The gradual decrease of vegetation with altitude can be seen by the colours changing from green to brown and finally light blue, representing the summit’s glacier.
 
Launched on 7 May 2013, Proba-V is a miniaturised ESA satellite tasked with a full-scale mission: to map land cover and vegetation growth across the entire planet every two days.
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 12/04/2015 10:52 am
This image is a mosaic based on Sentinel-1A satellite coverage of the Netherlands in three scans during March 2015.

The Netherlands borders the North Sea to the north and west, Germany to the east, and Belgium to the south. 

Home to some 17 million inhabitants, the country is extremely low-lying and remarkably flat, with large stretches of lakes, rivers and canals. With over 400 people per sq km, it is one of the most densely populated countries in the world.

The North Sea is regarded as a threat to the country and people. Following the huge flood of 1953, the whole area has been built up with dikes and protective dams, which are clearly visible in the image.

If the country were to lose the protection of its dunes and dikes, the most densely populated part of the Netherlands would be inundated, mainly by the sea but also partly by the rivers.

Also clearly visible in the image are the typical, narrow and long green fields between Utrecht and Rotterdam, scattered with canals and smaller villages.

The artificial island of Flevoland, which has been reclaimed from the Zuiderzee, an inland sea, is also visible.

We are also able to see the offshore wind farms built to support a green economy, using renewable energy that is readily available in the Netherlands due to a very high incidence of windy days.

On the bottom left corner is a river delta formed by the confluence of the Rhine, the Meuse and the Scheldt rivers, resulting in a multitude of islands. Rotterdam, Europe’s largest harbour, is visible at the northern edge, with ships waiting to enter the port in the North Sea.

Sentinel-1A has been in orbit since April 2014, monitoring the marine environment and mapping water and soil surfaces, among other major applications.

http://www.esa.int/spaceinimages/Images/2015/12/Dutch_mosaic
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 01/22/2016 09:43 am
Colours of the Persian Gulf
 

This beautiful, natural-colour image from Sentinel-2A on 18 September 2015 features the small nation of Bahrain and parts of eastern Saudi Arabia.
 
Located on the southwestern coast of the Persian Gulf, Bahrain is a small Arab state, made up of an archipelago consisting of Bahrain Island and some 30 smaller islands.
 
Owing to the high-resolution multispectral instrument on Sentinel-2A, the colour difference of the various types of surfaces is striking.
 
In the middle of the image, on the Persian Gulf, the King Fahd Causeway is clearly visible. Built between 1981 and 1986, it consists of a series of bridges and stretches of road connecting Saudi Arabia and Bahrain. The Saudi and Bahraini passport control centres are also noticeable in the middle of the Causeway.
 
On the right of the image is the island of Bahrain, home to some 1.5 million people, with its modern capital Manama featured at the top. The greys represent the densely built city centre and surrounding towns.
 
Strikingly relaxed and cosmopolitan, Manama has been at the centre of major trade routes since antiquity.
 
On the top right part of the island, on a smaller island about 7 km northeast of the capital, Bahrain International Airport is visible.
 
Most of Bahrain is a flat and arid desert plain, with recurrent droughts and dust storms the main natural dangers for its inhabitants. Famous for its pearl fisheries for centuries, today it is also known for its financial, commercial and communications sectors.
 
Towards the central left part of the island, Bahrain University is observable. Also visible, the Al Areen Wildlife Reservation, both a nature reserve and zoo, one of the five protected areas of the country, and the only protected area on land.
 
On the bottom-right tip of the island a series of horseshoe-shaped artificial atolls are clearly visible. Durrat Al Bahrain, one of the largest artificial islands in Bahrain, comprises six atolls and five fish-shaped islands.
 
On the left side of the image, in Saudi Arabia, part of the Rub’ al-Khali, the world’s largest sand desert, is also visible.
 
Distinct throughout the entire image, the striking variations of blue represent the shallow versus deep waters, with the presence of coral reefs.
 
Sentinel-2A has been in orbit since 23 June 2015 as a polar-orbiting, high-resolution satellite for land monitoring, providing imagery of vegetation, soil and water cover, inland waterways and coastal areas.
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 03/03/2016 10:06 am
Spain, Portugal and North Africa
 

Featuring Spain, Portugal and North Africa, this is one of the first images from the Sentinel-3A satellite. The image was taken by the satellite’s Ocean and Land Colour Instrument on 1 March 2016 and clearly shows the Strait of Gibraltar between the Atlantic and Mediterranean. Swirls of sediment and algae in the seawater can be seen along the southwest coast of Spain and along the coast of Morocco. The instrument picks out Morocco’s dry desert and snow-covered peaks of the Atlas Mountains and greener vegetated northern areas of Spain.
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 07/06/2016 03:49 pm
The Netherlands imaged by Proba-V

A false-colour image of the Netherlands, as seen in infrared by ESA’s Proba-V minisatellite, with vegetation shown in red, woodland in red–brown and built-up areas as green.

The Dutch are famous for their reclaiming of land from the North Sea through the construction of dykes and draining of enclosed land. To the south of Lake Ijssel, the largest lake in western Europe and formerly known as the South Sea, is the new province of Flevoland, established from reclaimed land three decades ago.

To the north of Lake Ijssel stands a string of islands called the Wadden Islands, which stretch from the Netherlands to Denmark. Out of the Dutch islands, five are inhabited and many are protected as wildlife habitats.

The 100 m-resolution image extends down to Belgium’s port of Antwerp and capital city of Brussels in the south, with Amsterdam, The Hague and Rotterdam arranged like a triangle on the west coast. The Hoge Veluwe National Park stands out to the southeast of Lake Ijssel.

North of The Hague on the coast at Noordwijk stands ESA’s single largest establishment, ESTEC. To visit the technical heart of the Agency.

Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 11/10/2016 09:03 am
Manila from Sentinel-1A
 

This Sentinel-1A radar image from 8 October 2016 features Manila, the capital of the Philippines. Manila, the most densely populated city in the world, is on the eastern shore of Manila Bay in the South China Sea. Numerous vessels can be clearly picked out around the busy port. To the east of the city lies the largest lake in the Philippines, Laguna de Baý. Manila is also home to the headquarters of the Asian Development Bank. On 9 November 2016, ESA and the Asian Development Bank signed an agreement to collaborate on using Earth observation to support sustainable development.
 
Read full story: http://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Observing_the_Earth/ESA_and_Asian_Development_Bank_join_forces
 
Credit: contains modified Copernicus Sentinel data (2015), processed by ESA
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 11/28/2016 08:52 am
Japan
 
Sentinel-3A captured part of Japan on 12 May in this false-colour image. Sitting on a volcanic zone in the Pacific Ring of Fire, Japan is prone to earthquakes – like the one felt earlier this week. In 2011 the Tōhoku earthquake and subsequent tsunami caused widespread damage and claimed over 15 000 lives.
 
In this image we can make out the location of the Median Tectonic Line – a fault system running primarily northeast–southwest in the southern part of the country. While it is impossible to see the fault line itself, rivers formed along the line and the fields and buildings in these river basins are visible as linear elements in the lower left part of the image on the smaller islands, giving a sense of the general location of the fault.
 
The water surrounding the islands appears blue on the left side of the image, but dark grey on the right. This is an effect of the Sun glinting off the water.
 
Taking a closer look at the waters along the coast, the light blue areas show the outflow of rivers, carrying sediments into the ocean.
 
Launched in February 2016, the Copernicus Sentinel-3A satellite carries four sensors working together, making it the most complex of all the Sentinel missions. The Ocean and Land Colour Instrument used to create this image offers a new eye on Earth, monitoring ocean ecosystems, supporting crop management and agriculture, and providing estimates of atmospheric aerosol and clouds.
 
This image is featured on the Earth from Space video programme.
 
Credit: contains modified Copernicus Sentinel data (2016), processed by ESA
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: emulatormania on 12/01/2016 04:36 pm
Amazing Image
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: eeergo on 06/19/2017 06:13 am
Appalling image from Terra of the deadly (upwards of 60 casualties) fires in Portugal this weekend: 200 square kilometers of scorched land.
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 07/14/2017 08:44 am
Vesuvius on fire
 
With Italy suffering high temperatures and drought, wildfires have broken out including blazes that are ravaging the slopes of Mount Vesuvius near Naples. Using images taken by the Copernicus Sentinel-2B satellite on 12 July 2017, the animation combines different sensor bands to highlight the numerous separate fires around this iconic volcano and the smoke billowing over the surrounding area.
 
This huge plume of smoke led some to believe that Vesuvius was erupting again. The last time it erupted was back in 1944, but is most famous for the 79 AD eruption that destroyed Pompeii.
 
The smoke from these fires poses the biggest threat and has forced several evacuations this week. The wooded slopes of Vesuvius form part of the Vesuvio National Park, which was set up in 1995 to protect the volcano and surroundings. Much of the woodland is now destroyed.
 
Vesuvius is the only active volcano on mainland Europe. The animation also shows another fire and smoke near Positano on the Amalfi coast.
 
The Sentinel-2 mission is based on a constellation of two identical satellites: Sentinel-2A and Sentinel-2B. Each carries a high-resolution multispectral camera working in 13 wavelength bands for a new perspective on land and vegetation. The combination of high-resolution, novel spectral capabilities, a field of vision covering 290 km and frequent revisit times is providing unprecedented views of Earth. Information from this mission is helping to improve agricultural practices, monitor the world’s forests, detect pollution in lakes and coastal waters, and contribute to disaster mapping.
 
Credit: contains modified Copernicus Sentinel data (2017),
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 07/21/2017 09:02 am
Northeastern Europe
 

The Copernicus Sentinel-3 satellite takes us over the Baltic Sea and surrounding countries.
 
Snow, ice and clouds dominate the image, providing us with an overall view of the area’s climate when this image was captured on 6 March. Sentinel-3 offers a ‘bigger picture’ for Europe’s Copernicus programme by systematically measuring Earth’s oceans, land, ice and atmosphere to monitor and understand large-scale global dynamics.
 
Finland is positioned at the centre of the image. The country has been called the ‘land of a thousand lakes’ – most of which are covered by ice and snow in this image.
 
To its west is the Gulf of Bothnia, the northernmost arm of the Baltic Sea separating part of Finland from Sweden. Clouds on the lower left obstruct our view of the Swedish capital, Stockholm.
 
In the upper left we can see part of Norway’s coastline with its famed fjords. During the ice age, ice and rivers carved deep valleys in the mountains. As the climate changed, most of the ice melted and the valleys were gradually filled with salt water from the coast, giving birth to the fjords.
 
Russia dominates the right side of the image with the ice-covered Lake Onega and partially covered Lake Ladoga.
 
Estonia is visible in the lower-central part of the image with significantly less snow cover, but with large areas of ice along its coast and on Lake Peipus.

 
Credit: contains modified Copernicus Sentinel data (2017), processed by ESA
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 07/21/2017 09:04 am
MAKS-2017
 
The Space Resource Remote Sensing Satellite "Resurs-P" (part of the orbital group ROSKOSMOSA) took a snapshot of the territory at which the International Aviation and Space Salon (MAKS-2017) is taking place.
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: yoichi on 07/26/2017 07:04 am
http://www.eorc.jaxa.jp/ALOS-2/en/img_up/dis_pal2_ant-iceshelf_20170725.htm

ALOS-2/PALSAR-2 Observation results on detachment of a large iceberg from Larsen-C Ice Shelf in Antarctic Peninsula.

Larsen is one of the huge ice shelves in Antarctica. Larsen-A and -B experienced the destructions in 1995 and 2002, respectively. Larsen Ice Shelf affects the ice loss in west Antarctica and its contribution to global sea level rise. Therefore, many glaciologists have paid much attention to their dynamics. On 12th July, 2017, a large iceberg separated from Larsen-C Ice Shelf, which is the expected weight of approx. one trillion ton, and the surface area is about 5,800 km2. Due to its size, ALOS-2 ScanSAR mode (Observation width: 350 km) is suitable for capturing the entire portion of the iceberg.

Color composite images acquired on 21th July 2017 (left) and 19th Aug 2016 (right).
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 11/13/2017 07:26 am
Viti Levu, Fiji
 

The Copernicus Sentinel-2B satellite takes us to the Republic of Fiji in the South Pacific Ocean on 28 September 2017. Part of Fiji’s largest island, Viti Levu, is pictured here, with coral reefs speckling the water.
 
Shaped by volcanic activity and earthquakes, the centre of the island is dominated by forests and a mountain range. The highest peak, Mount Tomanivi, reaches over 1320 m and is located on the central-right side of the image. While the area east of the mountain range receives heavy rainfall, the west side pictured here is in the ‘rain shadow’, meaning that the mountains block the rain clouds, leaving this area drier than the east.
 
In addition to the human population of some 600 000, one of the largest insect species also resides on Viti Levu: the giant Fijian long-horned beetle. The island is the only known home to the beetle, which grows up to about 15 cm long – excluding antennae and legs.
 
With more than 300 islands, the Fijian archipelago's low-lying coastal areas are at risk of sea-level rise – a devastating consequence of climate change. Satellites carry special instruments to measure sea-level rise – but not only. Different instruments can measure different climate variables, from greenhouse gases to melting glaciers, and offer a global view of the state of our planet.
 
The Republic of Fiji holds the presidency for this year’s COP 23 (Conference of the Parties) on climate, held this week and next at the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change headquarters in Bonn, Germany.
 
In February 2016, Cyclone Winston struck Fiji, damaging tens of thousands of homes and buildings, leaving more than 130 000 in need of shelter. With the COP 23 Presidency, Fiji calls for everyone to come together to build partnerships for climate action between governments, civil society and the private sector – and to work together to improve the climate resilience of vulnerable nations and communities.
 
 
Credit: contains modified Copernicus Sentinel data (2017),
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 12/08/2017 09:17 am
Toulouse, France
 

The Copernicus Sentinel-2A satellite takes us over Toulouse in southern France and the surrounding agricultural landscape.
 
Positioned on the banks of the River Garonne, the city is France’s fourth largest. It is nicknamed the Ville Rose – pink city – owing to the colour of the terracotta bricks commonly used in the local architecture. Even from space, the pinkish tint from the terracotta roof tiles is evident.
 
In the upper left we can see the runways of the Toulouse-Blagnac airport. The air route to the Paris Orly airport is one of the busiest in Europe.
 
Fields blanketing the countryside dominate the image. In fact, France is the EU’s leading agricultural power and is home to about a third of all agricultural land within the EU. While agriculture brings benefits for economy and food security, it puts the environment under pressure. Satellites can help to map and monitor land use, and the information they provide can be used to improve agricultural practices.
 
This image, also featured on the Earth from Space video programme, was captured on 10 July 2017 by Sentinel-2’s multispectral camera. Sentinel-2 is designed to provide images that can be used to distinguish between different crop types as well as data on numerous plant indices, such as leaf area, leaf chlorophyll and leaf water – all essential to monitor plant growth accurately.
 
Credit: contains modified Copernicus Sentinel data (2017), processed by ESA, CC BY-SA 3.0 IGO
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 01/06/2018 12:12 pm
Satellite Eyes Winter Nor'easter
 

Amazing view from space shows the #BombCyclone as this powerful winter nor'easter was moving toward New England on Jan. 4, 2018.
 
NOAA's GOES-East satellite provides infrared and visible data of the eastern half of the U.S. In a visible image taken Jan. 4, 2018 at 1842 UTC (1:42 p.m. EST) from NOAA’s GOES-16 satellite, known as GOES East showed the center of the low pressure area off the coast of the northeastern U.S. and a thick band of clouds bringing snow and gusty winds from the Mid-Atlantic states to New England.
 
The National Weather Service (NWS) Weather Prediction Center noted "a strengthening Nor'easter will bring snow and gusty winds, with blizzard conditions along the coast and blowing snow elsewhere, along the Middle Atlantic and Northeast through Thursday. Minor to major coastal flooding and erosion will be possible, especially during high tides. Dangerous travel, scattered power outages, and bitter wind chill can be expected across the entire east coast."
 
Image caption: This visible image of the U.S. was captured from NOAA's GOES-East satellite on Jan. 4, 2018 at 1842 UTC (1:42 p.m. EST).
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 03/13/2018 09:45 am
Italy and Mediterranean
 

The Copernicus Sentinel-3A satellite carries a suite of state-of-the art sensors that deliver a wealth of information to monitor our changing world, but this image was captured with its ocean and land camera. With a swath-width of 2700 km, this instrument delivers images that can span several countries, as we see here.
 
From east to west, the image features the islands of Corsica and Sardinia in the Mediterranean Sea, Italy and across the Adriatic Sea to Croatia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Serbia, and to the western edges of Romania. To the north and partly obscured by clouds, lie Germany, Switzerland, Austria and the Alps.
 
South of the Alps, haze hovers over Italy’s Po Valley. Following the Po River to the east, the sediment it carries can be seen entering the Adriatic Sea. In fact, sediments line most of the eastern coast of Italy, giving it a greenish blue frame, while the western coast is mostly sediment-free.
 
As the colours in this image suggest, the camera can be used to monitor ocean ecosystems and vegetation on land – all of which will bring significant benefits to society through more informed decision-making.
 
Sentinel-3A will soon be joined in orbit by its twin Sentinel-3B, which is scheduled for liftoff from Russia on 25 April. The pairing of identical satellites provides the best coverage and data delivery for Europe’s Copernicus programme – the largest environmental monitoring programme in the world.
 
The image, which is also featured on the Earth from Space video programme, was captured by Sentinel-3A on 28 September 2016.
 
Credits: contains modified Copernicus Sentinel data (2016), processed by ESA, CC BY-SA 3.0 IGO
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 03/28/2018 07:10 pm
Netherlands ice
 
The Dutch are now starting to see their famous spring flowers poke through the winter soil, but a few weeks ago it was a different story as a cold snap took grip.
 
This Copernicus Sentinel-2 image from 2 March 2018 shows Amsterdam and the IJmeer and Markemeer freshwater lakes covered by a thin layer of ice. As famous as the Netherlands is for flowers, it’s arguably equally renowned for ice skating. While the cold snap caused havoc throughout much of Europe, the Dutch were busy dusting off their skates and eager to hit the ice. The ice on these big lakes was much too thin to skate on, but some canals in Amsterdam were closed to boats to give the ice a chance to thicken and skaters took what is now a relatively rare opportunity to enjoy a national pastime.
 
A possible consequence of climate change, the Netherlands doesn’t see the ice that it used to. The Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute rates winters using an index: those scoring above 100 are considered cold. Between 1901 and 1980, there were seven winters above 200 – very cold. The last time the index exceeded the magical 100 mark was in 1997. In fact, this was also the last time the weather was cold enough for an ‘Elfstedentocht’: a 200 km skating race between 11 towns in the north of the country. In 2014, for the first time since measurements began, the index fell to zero.
 
While people enjoyed the ice below, this Sentinel-2 image, which is also featured on the Earth from Space video programme, allows us to view the beauty of this short-lived layer of ice from above.
 
Credits: contains modified Copernicus Sentinel data (2018), processed by ESA, CC BY-SA 3.0 IGO
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 03/28/2018 07:12 pm
Proba-1 view of the Great Pyramids
 
A view looking north to south of Egypt’s famous Giza Pyramid Complex, as seen by ESA’s Proba-1 minisatellite.
 
The smaller Pyramid of Menkaure is seen to towards the centre of the image, with the larger Pyramid of Khafre down and left of it, with the Great Pyramid of Giza – the largest and oldest of the three – below and left of that.
 
Three smaller pyramids are adjacent to the Pyramid Menkaure. The Giza Plateau sits on the edge of Cairo, fringed by suburbs.
 
The cubic-metre Proba-1 is the first in ESA’s series of satellites aimed at flight-testing new space technologies. It was launched on 22 October 2001 but is still going strong, having recently became the Agency’s longest-serving Earth-observing mission.
 
Proba-1’s main hyperspectral CHRIS imager is supplemented by this experimental High-Resolution Camera, acquiring black and white 5 m-resolution images.
 
Other innovations include what were then novel gallium-arsenide solar cells, the use of startrackers for gyroless attitude control, one of the first lithium-ion batteries – now the longest such item operating in orbit – and one of ESA’s first ERC32 microprocessors to run Proba-1’s agile computer.

 
Proba-1 led the way for the Sun-monitoring Proba-2  in 2009, the vegetation-tracking Proba-V  in 2013 and the Proba-3  precise formation-flying mission planned for late 2020.
 
This image was acquired on 6 January 2018.
 
Credits: ESA
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 06/05/2018 09:07 am
World Cup Football coming up, this time in Russia, and Roscosmos released photos of the stadiums the matches will be played in.
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 06/05/2018 09:08 am
.
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 06/05/2018 09:51 am
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 07/25/2018 02:03 pm
Denmark scorched

With temperatures soaring and no rain to speak of, Europe is the grip of a heatwave. As well as the havoc that wildfires have caused in countries such as the UK, Sweden and Greece, the current heat is scorching our land and vegetation. These two images from the Copernicus Sentinel-2 mission show agricultural fields around the town of Slagelse in Zealand, Denmark. The image from July 2017 shows lush green fields, but as the image from this July shows, the heat and lack of rain has taken its toll on the health of the vegetation. This year’s summer weather means that the same comparison could be made for many other parts of Europe.

The two Copernicus Sentinel-2 satellites carry high-resolution multispectral optical imagers to monitor changes in vegetation. While the difference in plant health in these two images is clear to see, the mission offers measurements of leaf area index, leaf chlorophyll and leaf water content, which allow for a detailed assessment of plant health.

Credits: contains modified Copernicus Sentinel data (2017–18), processed by ESA, CC BY-SA 3.0 IGO
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 10/30/2018 02:24 pm
iss057e051419 (Oct. 14, 2018) --- The Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant on the Pripyat River in northern Ukraine was pictured as the International Space Station orbited 257 miles above Eastern Europe. Across the Ukrainian border in Belarus, the Polesie State Radioecological Reserve was created to enclose territory most affected by radioactive fallout from the Chernobyl disaster.
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 11/16/2018 12:33 pm
Fogo, Cabo Verde

The Copernicus Sentinel-2A satellite takes us over Fogo, Cabo Verde. This small volcanic island, which can be seen in the right of the image, is about 25 km in diameter and home to around 35 000 people. The combined population of the nine inhabited islands that make up the Republic of Cabo Verde is estimated to be 550 000. These islands lie in the Atlantic Ocean, around 600 km off the west coast of Africa.

The black area in the island’s centre is the crater of the Pico do Fogo – Fogo’s highest point stands at 2800 m, and is also the highest peak in the entire Republic of Cabo Verde. It last erupted in November 2014 to February 2015, totalling 77 days of activity. In some places to 75% of the buildings were destroyed, mostly by lava.

In the northeast of the island, vibrant green highlights a vegetated area, where coffee is grown. There is a long tradition of coffee growing here, although the semi-arid climate and reduced rainfall in recent years make this a challenge. Other crops grown on the island include peanuts, oranges, tobacco, and beans. More arid and rocky areas are shown in a mix of yellow and orange.

In the bottom left of the image we can see the island of Brava, with three islets above: Rombos–Grande, Luís Carneiro, and Cima.

The Sentinel-2 mission for Europe’s Copernicus programme monitors our changing lands.
 
This image, which was captured on 22 January 2018, is also featured on the Earth from Space video programme.

Credits: contains modified Copernicus Sentinel data (2018), processed by ESA,CC BY-SA 3.0 IGO
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 01/10/2019 08:23 am
Proba-V view of Aral Sea

This Proba-V view shows all that is left of the Aral Sea, once one of the four largest lakes in the world and now one of the world’s major ecological disaster areas. It has shrunk into separate lakes, surrounded by Earth’s youngest desert.

The Aral Sea was once a large land-locked lake between Kazakhstan in the North and Uzbekistan in the South, possessing an area of 68 000 sq. km – twice that of Belgium.

However, the Aral Sea has dramatically shrunk since the 1960s when Soviet irrigation projects diverted water from the rivers supplying it. By the 2000s, the lake had shrunk to about 10% of its original size and by 2014 the horseshoe-shaped Southern Lake had virtually dried up.

Groundwater levels also fell, vegetation was laid waste and a once-thriving fishing industry collapsed. The exposed lakebed formed the newly-christened Aralkum Desert, spawning pesticide-laced sandstorms that can reach as far as the Himalayas.

Efforts to stabilise the situation are ongoing, including the replanting of hardy vegetation to reduce sandstorms. In 2005, the Kok-Aral Dam was completed to restore water levels in the Northern Lake –located at its bottom-east side. In addition, a sluice is periodically opened to replenish the Southern Lake.

Launched on 7 May 2013, Proba-V is a miniaturised ESA satellite tasked with a full-scale mission: to map land cover and vegetation growth across the entire planet every two days.

Its main camera’s continent-spanning 2250 km swath width collects light in the blue, red, near-infrared and mid-infrared wavebands at 300 m resolution and down to 100 m resolution in its central field of view.

VITO Remote Sensing in Belgium processes and then distributes Proba-V data to users worldwide. An online image gallery highlights some of the mission’s most striking images so far, including views of storms, fires and deforestation.

This 100 m-resolution image was acquired on 15 June 2018.
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 02/22/2019 08:59 am
Favignana, Levanzo and western Sicily

Captured on 3 September 2018 by the Copernicus Sentinel-2A satellite, this image shows part of western Sicily in Italy and two of the main Aegadian Islands: Favignana and Levanzo.

This false-colour image included the near-infrared channel and was processed in a way, that makes vegetation appear in bright red.

The bright turquoise colours, near the port city of Trapani, at the top of the image, and the Isola Grande in the middle of the image, depict salt marshes. Both the Saline di Trapani e Paceco Nature Reserve and the Stagnone Nature Reserve with their shallow sea waters, windy coast and abundant sunshine, make the area between Marsala, at the bottom of the image, and Trapani an ideal place for salt production.

The reserve consists of more than 1000 hectares of landscape dotted with windmills, migratory birds such as flamingos and light-red lagoons visible in summer. This greenish-blue colour is heavily contrasted with the black of the open Mediterranean Sea.

The islands, off the coast, are rich in history, both boasting Paleolithic and Neolithic cave paintings. The most famous being the Grotta del Genovese on the picturesque island of Levanzo, at the top left of the image. The cave was discovered only in 1949 and is estimated to be between 6000 and 10 000 years old.

Below, the butterfly-shaped island of Favignana, known for its tuna fisheries and a type of limestone known as tufa rock, is the largest of the Aegadian islands. In 241 BC, one of the Punic Wars’ naval battles was fought at the Cala Rossa (Red Cove), named after the bloodshed.

Copernicus Sentinel-2 is a two-satellite mission. Each satellite carries a high-resolution camera that images Earth’s surface in 13 spectral bands. The mission is mostly used to track changes in the way land is being used and to monitor the health of our vegetation.

Credits: contains modified Copernicus Sentinel data (2018), processed by ESA,CC BY-SA 3.0 IGO
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 07/12/2019 12:42 pm
Mount Fuji, Japan

The Copernicus Sentinel-2 mission takes us over Mount Fuji, Japan’s highest mountain standing at 3776 metres tall. In this spring image, the mountain can be seen coated in pure white snow.

This snow-capped mountain is often shrouded in cloud and fog, but this image was captured on a clear day, by the Copernicus Sentinel-2A satellite - flying 800 km above.

Mount Fuji is near the Pacific coast of central Honshu, straddling the prefectures of Yamanashi and Shizuoka. On a clear day, the mountain can be seen from Yokohama and Tokyo - both over 120 km drive away.

The majestic stratovolcano is a composite of three successive volcanoes. Generations of volcanic activity have turned it into the Mount Fuji as we know it today. This volcanic activity is a result of the geological process of plate tectonics. Mount Fuji is a product of the subduction zone that straddles Japan, with the Pacific Plate and the Philippine Plate being subducted under the Eurasian plate.

The last explosive activity occurred in 1707, creating the Hoei crater – a vent visible on the mountain’s southeast flank, as well as the volcanic ash field which can be seen on the east side.

Mount Fuji is a symbol of Japan, and a popular tourist destination. Around 300 000 people climb the mountain every year – and in the image several hiking trails can be seen leading to the base of the mountain. The city of Fujinomiya, visible in the bottom left of the image, is the traditional starting point for hikers.

Many golf courses, a popular sport in Japan, can be seen dotted around the image.

Worshipped as a sacred mountain, Mount Fuji is of great cultural importance for the Shinto religion. Pilgrims have climbed the mountain for centuries and many shrines and temples dot the landscape surrounding the volcano.

This image, captured on 8 May 2019
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: rpapo on 07/12/2019 11:23 pm
Cross-reference to: https://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=28749.msg1275628#msg1275628
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 07/16/2019 08:29 pm
Apollo 11 launch pad

Celebrating 50 years since Apollo 11 blasted off with the first humans that would walk on the Moon, Copernicus Sentinel-2 captures the historic launch site at Kennedy Space Center, Cape Canaveral, Florida, US.

On 16 July 1969, the Saturn V rocket carrying Apollo 11 began its momentous voyage to the Moon. It lifted off from launch pad 39A – which can be seen in this Copernicus Sentinel-2 image from 29 January 2019. Launch pad 39A is the second pad down from the top (the launch pad at the far top is 39B).

The crew – Neil Armstrong, mission commander, Michael Collins, command module pilot and Edwin ‘Buzz’ Aldrin, lunar module pilot – were embarking on a milestone in human history.

Just four days later, the lunar module, the Eagle, touched down. Watched on television by millions around the world, Neil Armstrong was the first to set foot on the Moon, famously saying, “That's one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind.”

A few minutes later he was joined by Buzz Aldrin. They took photographs, planted the US flag, spoke to President Richard Nixon via radio transmission and spent a couple of hours walking and collecting dust and rocks. The two men returned to lunar module, slept that night on the surface of the moon, and then the Eagle began its ascent back to re-join the command module, which had been orbiting the Moon with Michael Collins. Apollo splashed back down safely in the Pacific Ocean on 24 July.

The Moon has again captured the attention of space agencies. ESA and international partners are now looking forward to the next era of human exploration, and to better understand the resources available on the Moon to support human missions longer-term. While Apollo 11 touched down for the first time on the near side of the Moon 50 years ago, it is time to explore the far side, examine different types of lunar rocks there to probe deeper into the Moon’s geological history and to find resources like water-ice that are thought to be locked up in permanently shadowed craters near the Moon’s south pole.

Credits: contains modified Copernicus Sentinel data (2019), processed by ESA
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 07/26/2019 09:29 am
Too hot to handle

An extreme heatwave has hit Europe once again this week, following extreme weather in June. High temperatures are expected to peak today, reaching as high as 39—40°C, with Netherlands, Belgium and Germany recording their highest ever temperatures. Paris reached a sweltering 41°C, breaking its previous record in 1947.

The map has been generated using the Copernicus Sentinel-3’s Sea and Land Surface Temperature Radiometer. Whereas weather forecasts use predicted air temperatures, the satellite measures the real amount of energy radiating from Earth – therefore this map better represents the real temperature of the land surface. Clouds are visible in white in the image, while the light blue represent snow-covered areas.

In many countries, red heat warnings have been issued, including Italy, Spain and France and civilians are advised to avoid travelling and stay hydrated.
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 08/22/2019 07:16 am
Gran Canaria wildfire

An unprecedented wildfire has ripped through the island of Gran Canaria, one of Spain’s Canary Islands off the northwest coast of Africa. The wildfire, which started on Saturday 17 August, has now started to subside after engulfing around 10 000 hectares of land, leading to the evacuation of over 9000 people.

This false colour image, captured on 19 August, was created using the shortwave infrared bands from the Copernicus Sentinel-2’s instrument, and allows us to clearly see the fires on the ground in bright orange. Burn scars are visible in dark brown. These bands also allow us to see through smoke – but not clouds.

The Copernicus Emergency Mapping Service was activated to help respond to the fire. The service uses satellite observations to help civil protection authorities and, in cases of disaster, the international humanitarian community, respond to emergencies.

The fire started near the town of Tejeda and spread to Tamadaba Natural Park, driven by a combination of high temperatures, strong winds and low humidity. According to authorities, over 700 firefighters on the ground and 16 aircraft helped tackle the blaze, with some flames reaching over 50 metres in height.

Credits: contains modified Copernicus Sentinel data (2019),
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 08/26/2019 02:27 pm
Amazon forest fires

Images of fires in the Amazon rainforest captured by ESA astronaut Luca Parmitano during his Beyond mission to the International Space Station.


Credit: ESA/NASA-L.Parmitano
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 10/04/2019 01:16 pm
The Netherlands

The Netherlands is featured in this false-colour image captured by the Copernicus Sentinel-2 mission. This image was processed in a way that included the near-infrared channel, which makes vegetation appear bright red.

Amsterdam, the capital city of the country, is visible towards the top of the image, on the edge of the IJmeer lake. The city’s complex network of canals can be seen in the image, and the city is said to have over 1000 bridges.

Rotterdam is the second largest city in the Netherlands and is visible in the lower left, along the banks of the New Meuse River, which divides the municipality into its northern and southern parts. Rotterdam’s port is the largest port in Europe, stretching over 40 km in length and covering over 10 000 hectares.

The Hague is north of the port, visible along the North Sea coast. The Hague is home to the Dutch seat of government, and the city also hosts the International Court of Justice and the International Criminal Court.

To the north of The Hague is the coastal town of Noordwijk, home to ESA's European Space Technology Research Centre (ESTEC). ESTEC is ESA’s technical centre where new missions are designed, their industrial development is managed and, in some cases, the spacecraft and instruments are tested.

On Sunday 6 October, ESTEC is hosting its annual Open Day, where it will open its doors and give general public the chance to meet astronauts, space experts and get a behind-the-scenes glimpse of ESA’s largest establishment. The Open Day is now fully booked.

The theme of this year’s event is ESA to the Moon – where Dutch ESA astronaut André Kuipers will be joined by pioneering Apollo astronauts Walt Cunningham, who flew on the first crewed Apollo mission, and Rusty Schweickart, who was the first person to fly the Lunar Module and use an Apollo lunar spacesuit for a spacewalk.

Credits: contains modified Copernicus Sentinel data (2016), processed by ESA, CC BY-SA 3.0 IGO
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 10/19/2019 01:48 pm
Korean Peninsula

The Korean Peninsula in East Asia can be seen in this image captured by the Copernicus Sentinel-3 mission. The peninsula is over 900 km long and is located between the Sea of Japan, also known as the East Sea, to the east and the Yellow Sea to the west.

The peninsula is divided into two countries – the Democratic People's Republic of Korea (North Korea) and the Republic of Korea (South Korea).

North Korea is divided into nine provinces, with Pyongyang as the capital. Pyongyang, which can be seen in light grey in the upper left of the image, lies on the banks of the Taedong River and on a flat plain about 50 km inland from the Korea Bay.

The capital of South Korea is Seoul, which is in the northwest of the country, slightly inland and around 50 km south of the North Korean border.

As the image shows, the Korean peninsula is mostly mountainous and rocky, making less than 20% of the land suitable for farming.

The Yellow Sea owes its name to the silt-laden waters from the Chinese rivers that empty into it. It is also one of the largest shallow areas of continental shelf in the world with an average depth of around 50 m.

The waters off the coast of Korea are considered among the best in the world for fishing. The warm and cold currents attract a wide variety of species and the numerous islands, inlets and reefs provide excellent fishing grounds.

Sentinel-3 is a two-satellite mission to supply the coverage and data delivery needed for Europe’s Copernicus environmental monitoring programme. Each satellite’s instrument package includes an optical sensor to monitor changes in the colour of Earth’s surfaces. It can be used, for example, to monitor ocean biology and water quality.

This image was captured on 21 May 2019

Credits: contains modified Copernicus Sentinel data (2019), processed by ESA,
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 11/14/2019 08:12 am
Bushfires rage in Australia

The Copernicus Sentinel-3 mission captured the multiple bushfires burning across Australia’s east coast. Around 150 fires are still burning in New South Wales and Queensland, with hot and dry conditions accompanied with strong winds, said to be spreading the fires.

In this image, captured on 12 November 2019 at 23:15 UTC (13 November 09:15 local time), the fires burning near the coast are visible. Plumes of smoke can be seen drifting east over the Tasman Sea. Hazardous air quality owing to the smoke haze has reached the cities of Sydney and Brisbane and is affecting residents, the Australian Environmental Department has warned.

Hundreds of homes have been damaged or destroyed, and many residents evacuated. Flame retardant was dropped in some of Sydney’s suburbs as bushfires approached the city centre. Firefighters continue to keep the blazes under control.

The Copernicus Emergency Mapping Service was activated to help respond to the fires. The service uses satellite observations to help civil protection authorities and, in cases of disaster, the international humanitarian community, respond to emergencies.

Quantifying and monitoring fires is fundamental for the ongoing study of climate, as they have a significant impact on global atmospheric emissions. Data from the Copernicus Sentinel-3 World Fire Atlas shows that there were almost five times as many wildfires in August 2019 compared to August 2018.

Credits: contains modified Copernicus Sentinel data (2019),
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 01/10/2020 08:58 am
Smoke over New South Wales, Australia, from Copernicus Sentinel-3

Ferocious bushfires have been sweeping across Australia since September, fuelled by record-breaking temperatures, drought and wind. The country has always experienced fires, but this season has been horrific. A staggering 10 million hectares of land have been burned, at least 24 people have been killed and it has been reported that almost half a billion animals have perished. This Copernicus Sentinel-3 image shows smoke pouring from numerous fires in New South Wales on 3 January.

Credits: contains modified Copernicus Sentinel data (2020), processed by ESA,
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 01/10/2020 09:47 am
Smoke and flames in Australia
 
Ferocious bushfires have been sweeping across Australia since September, fuelled by record-breaking temperatures, drought and wind. The country has always experienced fires, but this season has been horrific. A staggering 10 million hectares of land have been burned, at least 24 people have been killed and it has been reported that almost half a billion animals have perished.

The Copernicus Sentinel-2 mission has been used to image the fires. The Sentinel-2 satellites each carry just one instrument – a high-resolution multispectral imager with 13 spectral bands. The smoke, flames and burn scars can be seen clearly in the image shown here, which was captured on 31 December 2019. The large brownish areas depict burned vegetation and provide an idea of the size of the area affected by the fires here – the brown ‘strip’ running through the image has a width of approximately 50 km and stretches for at least 100 km along the Australian east coast.

Credits: contains modified Copernicus Sentinel data
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 01/17/2020 01:07 pm
Japanese archipelago

The Copernicus Sentinel-3 mission takes us over the Japanese archipelago – a string of islands that extends about 3000 km into the western Pacific Ocean.

While the archipelago is made up of over 6000 islands, this image focuses on Japan's four main islands. Running from north to south, Hokkaido is visible in the top right corner, Honshu is the long island stretching in a northeast–southwest arc, Shikoku can be seen just beneath the lower part of Honshu, and Kyushu is at the bottom.

Honshu’s land mass comprises approximately four-fifths of Japan’s total area. Honshu’s main urban areas of Tokyo, Nagoya, and Osaka are clearly visible in the image. The large grey area in the east of the island, near the coast, is Tokyo, while the smaller areas depicted in grey are the areas around Nagoya and Osaka.

Honshu is also home to the country’s largest mountain, Mount Fuji. A volcano that has been dormant since it erupted in 1707, Mount Fuji is around 100 km southwest of Tokyo and its snow covered summit can be seen as a small white dot.

The Sea of Japan, also referred to as the East Sea, (visible to the west of the archipelago) separates the country from the east coast of Asia. The turquoise waters surrounding the island of Hokkaido can be seen at the top of the image, while the waters in the right of the image have a silvery hue because of sunglint – an optical effect caused by the mirror-like reflection of sunlight from the water surface back to the satellite sensor.

Sentinel-3 is a two-satellite mission to supply the coverage and data delivery needed for Europe’s Copernicus environmental monitoring programme. Each satellite’s instrument package includes an optical sensor to monitor changes in the colour of Earth’s surfaces. It can be used, for example, to monitor ocean biology and water quality.

Credits: contains modified Copernicus Sentinel data (2019), processed by ESA, CC BY-SA 3.0 IGO
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 01/17/2020 04:19 pm
Copernicus Sentinels 2020 calendar

ESA

Download the 2020 Copernicus Sentinels calendar. Each month offers a spectacular view of our home planet captured by one of the Sentinel satellites. This year the calendar focuses on European islands.

While these stunning images reveal Earth in all its beauty, they also highlight how global change is affecting our natural world.

http://www.esa.int/Applications/Observing_the_Earth/Copernicus/Copernicus_Sentinels_2020_calendar
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 01/23/2020 01:00 pm
The Philippines’ Taal volcano erupted on 12 January 2020 – spewing an ash plume approximately 15 km high and forcing large-scale evacuations in the nearby area.

This almost cloud-free image was captured today 23 January at 02:20 GMT (10:20 local time) by the Copernicus Sentinel-2 mission, and shows the island, in the centre of the image, completely covered in a thick layer of ash. 

This optical image has also been processed using the mission’s short-wave infrared band to show the ongoing activity in the crater, visible in bright red. Ash blown by strong winds can be seen in Agoncillo, visible southwest of the Taal volcano. Ash has also been recorded in other areas of the Batangas province, as well as Manila and Quezon.

According to The Philippine Institute of Volcanology and Seismology bulletin published today, sulphur dioxide emissions were measured at an average of around 140 tonnes. The Taal volcano still remains on alert level four, meaning an explosive eruption is possible in the coming hours or days. The highest alert level is five which indicates an eruption is taking place.

According to the National Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Council, over 50 000 people have been affected so far. In response to the eruption, the Copernicus Emergency Mapping Service was activated. The service uses satellite observations to help civil protection authorities and, in cases of disaster, the international humanitarian community, respond to emergencies.
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 03/13/2020 10:00 am
Victoria Falls

The Copernicus Sentinel-2 mission takes us over Victoria Falls – one of the world’s greatest natural wonders.

Victoria Falls, known locally as Mosi-oa Tunya or ‘the smoke that thunders,’ lies along the course of the Zambezi River, on the border between Zambia to the north and Zimbabwe to the south. The Zambezi River flows for around 3500 km from its source on the Central African Plateau and empties into the Indian Ocean.

In this image, captured on 22 February 2019, the river cuts from left to right in the image before plunging over Victoria Falls – visible as a white line in the image. While it is neither the highest nor the widest waterfall in the world, Victoria Falls has a width of around 1700 m and a height of over 100 m which classifies it as the world’s largest sheet of falling water.

The spray from the falls normally rises to a height of over 400 m and is sometimes visible from up to 40 km away. The water from the Zambezi River then continues and enters a narrow, zigzagging series of gorges, visible in the bottom right of the image.

Despite recent reports of Victoria Falls drying up, the Zambezi River is subject to large seasonal fluctuations – with water levels rising and dropping dramatically throughout the year. According to the Zambezi River Authority, the lowest recorded water flows recorded were during the 1995—96 season, which had an annual mean flow of around 390 cubic metres per second, compared to the long-term mean annual flow of around 1100 cubic metres per second.

The town of Victoria Falls, in Zimbabwe, can be seen west of the falls, while the town of Livingstone – named after the famous Scottish explorer – is visible just north of the falls, in Zambia. The Harry Mwanga Nkumbula airport can be seen west of the town.

The circular shapes in the image are an example of an irrigation method called pivot irrigation or centre-pivot irrigation, where equipment rotates around a central pivot and crops are watered with sprinklers.

Sentinel-2 is a two-satellite mission to supply the coverage and data delivery needed for Europe’s Copernicus programme. The mission’s frequent revisits over the same area and high spatial resolution allow changes in inland water bodies to be closely monitored.
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 03/20/2020 09:29 am
Kuwait

The Copernicus Sentinel-2 mission takes us over Kuwait in the Middle East. With a total area of around 17 800 sq km, Kuwait is considered one of the smallest countries in the world. At its most distant points, it is around 200 km north to south and 170 km east to west.

Situated in the northeast of the Arabian Peninsula, Kuwait shares its borders with Iraq to the north and Saudi Arabia to the south. Kuwait is generally low lying, with the highest point being only 300 m above sea level.

The flat, sandy Arabian Desert covers the majority of Kuwait and appears as a vast expanse of light sand-coloured terrain in this image, captured on 25 July 2019. During the dry season, between April and September, the heat in the desert can be severe with daytime temperatures reaching 45°C and, on occasion, over 50°C.

Kuwait City, visible jutting out into Kuwait Bay, holds most of the country’s population – making Kuwait one of the most urbanised countries in the world.

The various colours of Kuwait Bay come from a combination of wind and the amount of sunlight reflected off the waters. The Sheikh Jaber Al-Ahmad Al-Sabah Causeway can be seen cutting across the bay. The bridge is 36 km long – making it the fourth largest bridge in the world.

Al-Jahra lies around 50 km west of Kuwait City and is visible as a small, green oasis on the west side of Kuwait Bay. It is the centre of the country’s principal agricultural region – producing primarily fruits and vegetables. The circular shapes to the right of Al-Jahra are an example of the pivot irrigation or centre-pivot irrigation method, where equipment rotates around a central pivot and crops are watered with sprinklers.

Just south of Kuwait City lies the Great Burgan oil field – considered the second largest oil field in the world. The Great Burgan comprises three smaller fields: Burgan, Al-Maqwa and Al-Ahmadi. The oil fields can be identified an extensive network of interlocking roads which connect the individual wellheads.

Satellites, such as Copernicus Sentinel-2, allow us to capture images such as these from space, but also allows us to monitor changing places on Earth. Flying 800 km above, satellites take the pulse of our planet by systematically imaging and measuring changes taking place, which is particularly important in regions that are otherwise difficult to access.
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 04/15/2020 08:17 am
Deserted Venetian lagoon

Italy’s efforts to limit the spread of the coronavirus disease has led to a decrease of boat traffic in Venice’s famous waterways – as captured by the Copernicus Sentinel-2 mission.

The Italian government imposed a nationwide lockdown on 9 March 2020, drastically reducing the movement of Venice’s boats including the ‘vaporetti,’ or water buses, as well as cruise ships.

These images show one of the effects of the locked-down city of Venice, in northern Italy. The top image, captured 13 April 2020, shows a distinct lack of boat traffic compared to the image from 19 April 2019.

The Grand Canal and the Giudecca Channel appear almost empty compared to last year, and traffic from Venice to the island of Murano appears to be non-existent. Two large cruise ships can be seen in the U-shaped Port of Venice in 2019, west of the city, while this year the port appears empty.

According to the Italian news agency, ANSA, the streets and canals of Venice remained almost empty over Easter – with only police officers patrolling the streets and waterways.

Meanwhile, the lockdown has led to a sharp decline in air pollution across Europe – particularly in Rome and the Po Valley in northern Italy.
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 04/27/2020 04:00 pm
The Netherlands as seen from Space. 27 April is King's Day in the Netherlands 🇳🇱

Image credit: satellite Sentinel2🛰️🇪🇺 📸 EUSpace
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 05/08/2020 08:47 am
Northwest Greenland

Northwest Greenland is featured in this icy image captured by the Copernicus Sentinel-3 mission.

Lying in the North Atlantic Ocean, Greenland is the world’s largest island and is home to the second largest ice sheet after Antarctica. Greenland’s ice sheet covers more than 1.7 million sq km and covers most of the island.

Ice sheets form in areas where snow that falls in winter does not melt entirely over the summer. Over thousands of years, layers of snow pile up into thick masses of ice, growing thicker and denser as the new snow and ice layers compress the older layers.

Ice sheets are constantly in motion. Near the coast, most of the ice moves through relatively fast-moving outlets called ice streams, glaciers and ice shelves.

In the top centre of this image, captured on 29 July 2019, the Petermann glacier is visible. Petermann is one of the largest glaciers connecting the Greenland ice sheet with the Arctic Ocean. Upon reaching the sea, a number of these large outlet glaciers extend into the water with a floating ‘ice tongue’. Icebergs occasionally break or ‘calve’ off these tongues.

In this image, sea ice and icebergs can be seen in the Nares Strait – the waterway between Greenland and Canada’s Ellesmere Island, visible top left in the image.

On the tip of Ellesmere Island lies Alert – the northernmost known settlement in the world. Inhabited mainly by military and scientific personnel on rotation, Alert is about 800 km from the closest community, which is roughly the same distance from Alert to the North Pole.

Scientists have used data from Earth-observing satellites to monitor Greenland’s ice sheet. According to a recent study, both Greenland and Antarctica are losing mass six times faster than they were in 1990s. Between 1992 and 2017, Greenland lost 3.8 trillion tonnes of ice – corresponding to around 10 mm contribution to global sea-level rise.

Melting ice sheets caused by rising temperatures and the subsequent rising of sea levels is a devastating consequence of climate change, especially for low-lying coastal areas. The continued satellite observations of the Greenland ice sheet are critical in understanding whether ice mass loss will continue to accelerate and the full implications of this anticipated change.

Credits: contains modified Copernicus Sentinel data (2019), processed by ESA, CC BY-SA 3.0 IGO
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 05/15/2020 12:30 pm
San Francisco Bay

The Copernicus Sentinel-2 mission takes us over San Francisco Bay in the US state of California.

San Francisco Bay, almost 100 km in length, is a shallow estuary surrounded by the San Francisco Bay Area – an extensive metropolitan region that is dominated by large cities such as San Francisco, Oakland and San Jose. The densely populated urban areas around the bay contrast strongly with the surrounding green forest and park areas.

In the upper right of the image, the delta of the Sacramento and San Joaquin rivers is visible – with the brown, sediment-filled water flowing down into San Pablo Bay. Here, the murky waters mix before flowing into the larger bay area, which is connected to the Pacific Ocean via the Golden Gate strait. A large sediment plume can be seen travelling westward into the Pacific in the left of the image.

The Golden Gate Bridge, around 2.7 km long, is visible crossing the opening of the bay into the Pacific Ocean between Marin County and the city of San Francisco – which can be seen at the tip of the southern peninsula in the centre of the image. Treasure, Angel and Alcatraz islands can be seen sticking out of the waters of the bay, with several bridges connecting its east and west shores. Several boats are also visible.

The bright green and yellow colours in the bottom right of the image are salt ponds and are part of the Don Edwards National Wildlife Refuge. Covering an area of around 120 sq km, the refuge contains salt marsh, mudflat and vernal pool habitats for millions of migratory birds and endangered species.

Sentinel-2 is a two-satellite mission to supply the coverage and data delivery needed for Europe’s Copernicus programme. The mission’s frequent revisits over the same area and high spatial resolution allow changes in water bodies to be closely monitored.

image captured on 25 January 2019

Credits: contains modified Copernicus Sentinel data (2019), processed by ESA, CC BY-SA 3.0 IGO
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 05/29/2020 09:59 am
The Copernicus Sentinel-2 mission takes us over part of Abu Dhabi – one of the seven emirates that constitute the United Arab Emirates (UAE).

Covering an area of approximately 67 000 sq km, the Emirate of Abu Dhabi is the largest emirate in the UAE – accounting for around 87% of the total land area of the federation. Abu Dhabi has around 200 islands lying along its 700 km long coastline.

The city of Abu Dhabi, after which the emirate is named, is located on an island in the Persian Gulf and can be seen slightly below the centre of the image. Abu Dhabi is the capital and the second-most populous city of the UAE – after Dubai. The city is directly connected to the mainland by three bridges: Maqta, Mussafah and Sheikh Zayed.

Just east of the city lies the Mangrove National Park, visible as a dark green patch of land. The protected area is around 20 sq km and includes mangrove forests, salt marshes, mudflats and is home to more than 60 bird species.

The waters surrounding Abu Dhabi are said to hold the world’s largest population of Indo-Pacific humpback dolphins. The lighter aqua colours are shallow waters, which contrast with the dark coloured waters of the Gulf.

The iconic red roof of Ferrari World can be seen in the centre-right of the image. The Ferrari-themed park is located on Yas Island and is said to be the world’s largest indoor theme park. Abu Dhabi International Airport is visible southeast of the park.

Sentinel-2 is a two-satellite mission to supply the coverage and data delivery needed for Europe’s Copernicus programme. The mission’s frequent revisits over the same area and high spatial resolution allow changes in water bodies to be closely monitored.

This image was captured on 27 January 2019
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 06/12/2020 02:22 pm
Barcelona, Spain

The Copernicus Sentinel-2 mission takes us over Barcelona – the second largest city in Spain.

On the northeast coast of the Iberian Peninsula, Barcelona occupies a low plateau along the Mediterranean coastal plain. The city and its red roofs contrast with the forested hills and the sea that surround it.

The famous Avinguda Diagonal avenue can be seen in the right of the image. The road is one of Barcelona’s broadest avenues and cuts the city diagonally in two, hence its name. The circular Plaça de les Glòries Catalanes was meant to be the city centre in the original urban plan, but nowadays is used largely as a roundabout.

Dominating the left side of the image are the Garraf Massif mountains, their cliffs reaching the Mediterranean coast. Its highest point on the coastal side is La Morella – almost 600 m above sea level.

The Llobregat River can be seen entering the image in the top left. The river rises in the eastern Pyrenees and flows southeast before emptying into the Mediterranean Sea. Before reaching the sea, the river forms a small delta, which used to provide a large extension of fertile land but is now largely urbanised. Barcelona-El Prat airport can be seen to the left of the river. Along the coast, the port of Barcelona, one of Europe’s top ten largest container ports, is visible.

Barcelona is home to the Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya – the largest engineering university in Catalonia. In 2017, the university won ESA’s Small Satellite Challenge and the top prize at the Copernicus Masters competition with its Federated Satellite Systems (FSSCat) project. The FSSCat mission consists of two small CubeSat satellites, each about the size of a shoebox, and will use state-of-the-art dual microwave and multispectral optical sensors.

Ф-sat-1 – an enhancement of FSSCat carried on one of the two CubeSats – is set to launch soon from Europe’s spaceport in Kourou. It will be the first experiment to demonstrate how artificial intelligence can be used for Earth observation. Ф-sat-1 will have the ability to filter out less than perfect images so that only usable data are returned to Earth. This will allow for the efficient handling of data so that users will have access to timely information – ultimately benefiting society at large.

Ф-sat-1 will acquire an enormous number of images that will allow scientists to detect urban heat islands, monitor changes in vegetation and water quality, as well as carry out experiments on the role of evapotranspiration in climate change.

Credits: contains modified Copernicus Sentinel data, processed by ESA, CC BY-SA 3.0 IGO
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 07/09/2020 11:25 am
https://youtu.be/pC_WQGirEAA



The Copernicus Sentinel-5P mission is dedicated to monitoring air pollution by measuring a multitude of trace gases as well as aerosols. This animation shows the spread of aerosols from the Saharan dust plume moving westward across the Atlantic Ocean from 1 June to 26 June 2020. This plume has reached the Caribbean, South America and the United States.
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 08/12/2020 08:39 am
The island of Mauritius has declared a ‘state of environmental emergency’ after a grounded vessel began leaking tonnes of oil into the Indian Ocean. Satellite images, which show the dark slick spreading in the nearby waters, are being used to monitor the ongoing spill.

The MV Wakashio vessel, reported to be carrying nearly 4000 tonnes of oil, ran aground on a coral reef on Mauritius’s southeast coast on 25 July. According to media reports, more than 1000 tonnes of fuel have leaked from the cracked vessel into the ocean – polluting the nearby coral reefs, as well as the surrounding beaches and lagoons.

In this image, captured on 11 August by the Copernicus Sentinel-2 mission, the MV Wakashio, visible in the bottom of the image, is stranded close to Pointe d’Esny, an important wetland area. The oil slick can be seen as a thin, black line surrounded by the bright turquoise colours of the Indian Ocean. Oil is visible near the boat, as well as other locations around the lagoon.
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 08/20/2020 11:19 am
Captured on 19 August 2020, this Copernicus Sentinel-3 image shows the extent of the smoke from fires currently ablaze in California, US. Amid the blistering heatwave, which is in its second week, there are around 40 separate wildfires across the state. Record high temperatures, strong winds and thunderstorms have created the dangerous conditions that have allowed fires to ignite and spread. The fires are so extreme in regions around the San Francisco Bay Area that thousands of people have been ordered to evacuate.
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 08/28/2020 09:13 am
Cloud-free Iceland

28/08/2020

The Copernicus Sentinel-3 mission shows us a rare, cloud-free view of Iceland captured on 14 August 2020.

The large, white area visible on the island is a national park that encompasses the Vatnajökull Glacier. Covering an area of around 8400 sq km with an average ice thickness of more than 900 m, Vatnajökull is not only classified as the biggest glacier in Iceland, but the biggest in Europe.

The white, circular patch in the centre of the country is Hofsjökull, the country’s third largest glacier and its largest active volcano. The elongated white area west of Hofsjökull is Langjökull, Iceland’s second largest ice cap.

Reykjavík, the capital and largest city of Iceland, is located on the Seltjarnarnes Peninsula, in southwest Iceland. In the top-left of the image, several sea ice swirls can be seen off the coast of Greenland.

Sentinel-3 is a two-satellite mission to supply the coverage and data delivery needed for Europe’s Copernicus environmental monitoring programme. Each satellite’s instrument package includes an optical sensor to monitor changes in the colour of Earth’s surfaces.
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 09/04/2020 08:23 am
Gulf of Kutch, India
04/09/2020

The Copernicus Sentinel-2 mission takes us over the Gulf of Kutch – also known as the Gulf of Kachchh – an inlet of the Arabian Sea, along the west coast of India.

The Gulf of Kutch divides the Kutch and the Kathiawar peninsula regions in the state of Gujarat. Reaching eastward for around 150 km, the gulf varies in width from approximately 15 to 65 km. The area is renowned for extreme daily tides which often cover the lower lying areas – comprising networks of creeks, wetlands and alluvial tidal flats in the interior region.

Gujarat is the largest salt producing state in India. Some of the white rectangles dotted around the image are salt evaporation ponds which are often found in major salt-producing areas. The arid climate in the region favours the evaporation of water from the salt ponds.

Just north of the area pictured here, lies the Great Rann of Kutch, a seasonal salt marsh located in the Thar desert. The Rann is considered the largest salt desert in the world.

The Gulf of Kutch has several ports including Okha (at the entrance of the gulf), Māndvi, Bedi, and Kandla. Kandla, visible on the northern peninsula in the left of the image, is one of the largest ports in India by volume of cargo handled.

The gulf is rich in marine biodiversity. Part of the southern coast of the Gulf of Kutch was declared Marine Sanctuary and Marine National Park  in 1980 and 1982 respectively – the first marine conservatory established in India. The park covers an area of around 270 sq km, from Okha in the south (not visible) to Jodiya. There are hundreds of species of coral in the park, as well as algae, sponges and mangroves.

Copernicus Sentinel-2 is a two-satellite mission. Each satellite carries a high-resolution camera that images Earth’s surface in 13 spectral bands. The mission’s frequent revisits over the same area and high spatial resolution allow changes in water bodies to be closely monitored.

This image was acquired on 4 April 2020
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 09/25/2020 08:43 am
Tarawa Atoll in the Republic of Kiribati – a remote Pacific nation threatened by rising seas.

The Republic of Kiribati is an independent island nation consisting of some 33 atolls near the equator in the central Pacific. The islands are spread over approximately 3.5 million sq km of ocean, but with a total land area of only 800 sq km.

Tarawa Atoll, pictured here, lies approximately halfway between Hawaii and Australia. Tarawa consists of a large lagoon fringed by a V-shaped reef, around 35 km long, and is made up of more than 30 islets. Tarawa, the site of a brutal World War II battle, is divided into North and South Tarawa.

South Tarawa, is made up of a thin, string of islets joined by causeways and is home to more than half of Kiribati’s 100 000 citizens. Bonriki International Airport, serves as the main gateway to the country, and can be seen in the bottom right of the image.

Kiribati is one of the lowest-lying nations in the world, with many of the country’s atolls and coral islands rising no higher than 2 m above sea level – making them extremely vulnerable to sea level rise. Kiribati has already seen growing damage from storms and flooding. In 1999, two of the nation’s unpopulated islets, Tebua Tarawa and Abanuea, disappeared underwater entirely.

The Special Report on the Ocean and Cryosphere in a Changing Climate on sea level rise states that the global mean sea level is likely to rise between 0.29 m and 1.1 m by the end of this century. While this may not sound like a lot, small island nations, including Kiribati, will face particularly devastating consequences.

Small changes in sea-level rise will not only cause flooding, erosion, soil contamination and coral degradation, but will ultimately shrink more of Kiribati’s land area – displacing many of its inhabitants.

It is vital that over the coming decades, the changing height of Earth’s sea surface continues to be closely monitored. Set to launch in November, the Copernicus Sentinel-6 Michael Freilich satellite will accurately measure changes in global sea level. Mapping up to 95% of Earth’s ice-free ocean every 10 days, it will provide key information on ocean currents, wind speed and wave height for maritime safety.

This new satellite will assume the role as a reference mission, continuing the ‘gold standard’ record for climate studies started in 1992 – extending the legacy of sea-surface height measurements until at least 2030.

This image, acquired on 14 June 2020
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 10/02/2020 08:30 am
The Copernicus Sentinel-2 mission takes us over New York City – the most populous city in the United States.

With a population of over 8 million people distributed over an area of around 780 sq km, New York City is the most densely populated major city in the US. Situated on one of the world’s largest natural harbours, New York City is composed of five boroughs.

In this image, captured on 26 August 2019, the island of Manhattan is visible in the centre, bounded by the Hudson, East and Harlem rivers. In the middle of Manhattan, Central Park can be seen as a long, green rectangle with a large lake in the middle.

The Brooklyn and Queens boroughs can be seen on the right. John F. Kennedy International Airport –the busiest international air passenger gateway into North America – can easily be identifiable in the lower right of the image.

The Bronx is visible north of Manhattan, while Staten Island can be seen in the lower left of the image. New Jersey dominates the upper left side of the image.

New York City’s 900 km of shoreline border the ocean, rivers, inlets and bays, and a harbour that is home to one of the largest ports on the east coast. Like many other cities that border an ocean, New York is at risk of flooding due to rising sea levels.

Data show that since 1993, the global mean sea level has risen, on average, just over 3 mm every year. Even more worryingly, this rate of rise has increased in recent years.

Sea level rise flooding of US coastlines is becoming more frequent each year. Rising sea levels are expected to worsen storm flooding in low-lying neighbourhoods in coastal areas, and permanently inundate some parts. Retreating shorelines and accelerating erosion will threaten coastal homes and businesses.

The upcoming Copernicus Sentinel-6 Michael Freilich satellite, set to launch in November from the Vandenberg Air Force Base in California, US, is the first of two identical satellites that will provide observations of sea level change.

Each Sentinel-6 satellite carries an altimeter that works by measuring the time it takes for radar pulses to travel to Earth’s surface and back again to the satellite. Combined with precise satellite location data, altimetry measurements yield the height of the sea surface.
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 10/09/2020 08:38 am
Part of the Laguna San Rafael National Park, located on the Pacific coast of southern Chile, is pictured in this image captured by the Copernicus Sentinel-2 mission.

Covering an area of around 17000 sq km, the park includes the Northern Patagonian Ice Field – a  remnant of the Patagonian Ice Sheet that once covered the region. Today, despite the ice field being just a small fraction of its previous size, it is still the second largest continuous mass of ice outside of the polar regions.

The image depicts the west part of the Northern Patagonian Ice Field which has 28 exit glaciers, with the largest two, San Rafael and San Quintín, visible here. San Rafael Glacier, which can be seen in the upper-right of the image, is one of the most actively calving glaciers in the world and the fastest-moving glacier in Patagonia – ‘flowing’ at a speed of around 7.6 km per year.

The glacier calves west towards the Pacific Ocean and into the Laguna San Rafael (Lake San Rafael), visible directly to the left of the glacier. The lake was formed due to the retreat of the glacier after the last ice age, and today is a popular tourist destination, with ships sailing to the lagoon to see ice falling from the glacier.

Directly below lies the San Quintín glacier, the second-largest glacier in the northern ice field. The glacier drains to the west, where hundreds of icebergs can be seen dotted in the lake. Until 1991, the glacier terminated on land, but with its retreat, the basin filled with water and formed the proglacial lake we see today.

Together with its twin, San Rafael, the glaciers have been receding dramatically under the influence of global warming. Satellite data show that some of the glaciers in Patagonia are retreating faster than anywhere in the world. As temperatures rise and glaciers and ice sheets melt, the water eventually runs into the ocean, causing sea level to rise.

According to a report last year, glaciers worldwide have lost over 9000 gigatonnes of ice since 1961 – raising sea level by 27 mm. Rising seas are one of the most distinctive and potentially devastating effects of Earth’s warming climate.

For the last 30 years, a series of satellites have collected global sea level measurements to keep an eye on its rising trend. Scheduled for launch in November 2020, the Copernicus Sentinel-6 Michael Freilich satellite will be the next spacecraft to continue the long-term record of sea-surface height measurements started in 1992.

The satellite will collect the most accurate data on sea level and monitor how it changes over time. The satellite carries a radar altimeter, which works by measuring the time it takes for radar pulses to travel to Earth’s surface and back again to the satellite.

The spacecraft also carries five instruments to help monitor atmospheric conditions that affect the radar signal and to determine the precise position and velocity of the satellite in orbit. Other instruments measure atmospheric temperature and humidity profiles for weather forecasting and the radiation environment around the satellite.
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 10/09/2020 08:40 am
https://youtu.be/3klU3B-jAis
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 10/16/2020 08:40 am
Zeeland, Netherlands
16/10/2020

The Copernicus Sentinel-2 mission takes us over Zeeland – the westernmost province in the Netherlands.

Located around 150 km from Amsterdam, Zeeland consists of a complex system of islands, peninsulas and waterways. It also comprises Zeeuwsch-Vlaanderen – a strip of the Flanders mainland between the Western Scheldt (Westerschelde) and Belgium.

The province of Zeeland lies on the large river delta at the mouth of several rivers, like the Scheldt (Schelde) and Meuse (Maas) rivers. The lighter aqua colours in the image depict the shallow waters of the delta with riverbeds and several sandbanks visible. The brown coloured waters indicate a higher sediment content, which contrasts with the darker waters of the North Sea.

The Port of Rotterdam, the largest seaport in Europe, is visible top-right in the image. Antwerp, in Belgium, is visible in the bottom-right and the quaint city of Bruges can be seen in the bottom-left of the image.

Zeeland is one of the main agricultural provinces in the Netherlands with one of the largest areas of arable farmland. The patchwork of agricultural fields visible on the islands and mainland show the fields in the various stages of growth or harvest. The area supports cereals, potatoes, beets, cattle and horticulture.

Large parts of Zeeland, which translates to ‘sea land,’ lie below sea level. The province was the site of a deadly flood in 1953 brought on by a combination of high spring tides and a strong windstorm that severely damaged the low-lying coastal region.

As a result, the Dutch government began to implement the Delta Project – an elaborate system of dykes, canals, dams and bridges to hold back the North Sea. In this image, the 9km-long Eastern Scheldt Storm Surge Barrier (Oosterscheldekering) is visible between the islands of Schouwen-Duiveland and Noord-Beveland.

Since sea-level rise is a key indicator of climate change, accurately monitoring the changing height of the sea surface over decades is essential for climate science, for policy-making and, ultimately, for protecting the lives of those in low-lying regions at risk.

The Copernicus Sentinel-6 Michael Freilich satellite, set to launch in November, is the first of two identical satellites to be launched sequentially to provide accurate measurements of sea level change.

Both satellites will reach 66°N and 66°S – a specific orbit occupied by the earlier missions that supplied the reference sea-surface height data over the last three decades. This orbit will allow for 95% of Earth’s ice-free ocean to be mapped every 10 days.

This image, acquired on 30 May 2020
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 10/16/2020 08:40 am
https://youtu.be/tOGGAl5Wlls
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 10/23/2020 10:06 am
Ganges Delta
23/10/2020

The Copernicus Sentinel-3 mission takes us over the Ganges Delta – the world’s largest river delta.

Covering an area of around 100 000 sq km, the Ganges Delta lies in both Bangladesh and the State of West Bengal in India. The delta is formed mainly by the large, sediment-laden waters of the Ganges and Brahmaputra rivers.

The river bed of the Ganges can be seen in the left of the image, while Brahmaputra can be seen to the right. The snow-covered Himalayas can be seen at the top of the image.

The Ganges river carries fertile soil and nutrients, which it deposits across its vast delta floodplain. The river flows for over 2400 km from the Himalayas before emptying into the Bay of Bengal – the world’s largest bay. It is here where the murky coloured waters mix with the darker coloured waters of the Indian Ocean.

The delta is largely covered with a swamp forest, known as the Sundarbans, and can be seen in dark green near the coast with several rivers snaking through it. The Sundarbans, which translates as 'beautiful forest' in Bengali, are the world’s largest mangrove forest and provide a critical habitat for numerous species, including the Bengal tiger and the Indian python. 

The city of Kolkata (formerly Calcutta) is visible near the Sundarbans in the lower-centre of the image. With over 14 million inhabitants, Kolkata is one of India’s largest cities and is the dominant urban centre of eastern India. Dhaka, the capital of Bangladesh, can be seen in the lower-right of the image, just north of the Buriganga river. Dhaka is Bangladesh’s most populous city and is one of the largest metropolises in South Asia.

With a population of over 100 million people, the delta is one of the most densely populated deltas in the world and is extremely vulnerable to climate change. The residents of this region are particularly at risk from repeated catastrophic floods due to heavy runoff of meltwater from the Himalayas, intense rainfall during the monsoon season and from accelerated sea-level rise exacerbated by land subsidence.

Sea-level rise is a global issue, but regional differences in sea-level rise put some places at risk more than others. In the coming decades, Asia is likely to feel the worst effects because of the number of people living in low-lying coastal regions. Bangladesh, India, China, Vietnam, Indonesia and Thailand are home to the greatest number of people who today live on land that could be threatened by permanent inundation by 2100.

It is vital that the changing height of the sea surface continues to be closely monitored over the coming decades. Set to launch next month, the Copernicus Sentinel-6 mission will be key in undertaking this important role until at least 2030. Renamed in honour of the former director of NASA’s Earth Science Division, the Copernicus Sentinel-6 Michael Freilich satellite is the first ESA-developed satellite to be given a ride into space on the SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket, the world’s first orbital class reusable rocket.

Since the satellite arrived at Vandenberg in California on 24 September, it has been transferred to the SpaceX Payload Processing Facility, unpacked and undergone a series of tests to make sure all will be well during the rigours of liftoff and during its five-plus years in orbit around Earth.

This image, captured on 31 March 2020
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 10/30/2020 08:25 am
Republic of Maldives

30/10/2020

All 1200 islands that make up the Republic of Maldives are featured in this spectacular image captured by the Copernicus Sentinel-3 mission.

The ocean and colour instrument onboard the Copernicus Sentinel-3 mission has a swath width of 1270 km which allows us to enjoy this wide view of the Maldive Islands and its surroundings. A popular tourist destination, the Maldives lie in the Indian Ocean, around 700 km southwest of the southernmost tip of mainland India, visible in the top-right of the image.

The nation consists of a chain of small coral islands that are grouped into clusters of atolls – visible as circular or oval-shaped reef structures in the middle of the image. Scattered across 90 000 sq km of ocean, the Maldives are one of the most geographically dispersed countries in the world. The islands extend more than 820 km from north to south and around 130 km from east to west.

Most atolls of the Maldives consist of a large, ring-shaped coral reef supporting numerous small islands. In this image, captured on 29 March 2020, the Huvadhu Atoll and Addu Atoll are partially covered by clouds (visible in the bottom of the image).

Different cloud formations can be seen dotted around the image, the difference in appearance is most likely due to the different height above the surface. The Maldive archipelago is frequently covered by clouds, making this almost cloud-free image quite rare.

One of the world’s lowest-lying countries, more than 80% of the Maldives’ land is less than one metre above mean sea level, making its population of over 500 000 people extremely vulnerable to sea swells, storm surges and severe weather. The Special Report on the Ocean and Cryosphere in a Changing Climate on sea level rise states that the global mean sea level is likely to rise to around 1m  by the end of this century, which could ultimately cover the majority of the nation.

Scheduled for launch on 10 November from the Vandenberg Air Force Base in California, the Copernicus Sentinel-6 Michael Freilich satellite is the first of two identical satellites to be launched sequentially to provide accurate measurements of sea-level change.

In order to better understand how rising seas will impact humanity, scientists and researchers need long climate records. Copernicus Sentinel-6 will take on the role of radar altimetry reference mission, continuing the long-term record of measurements of sea-surface height started in 1992 by the French-US Topex Poseidon and then the Jason series of satellite missions. By continuing this time series, Sentinel-6 will allow for further climate research and help scientists monitor the effects of climate change.
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 11/06/2020 08:48 am
Crete, Greece
06/11/2020

Greece’s largest and most populous island, Crete, is featured in this image captured by the Copernicus Sentinel-1 mission.

The two identical Copernicus Sentinel-1 satellites carry radar instruments, which can see through clouds and rain, and in the dark, to image Earth’s surface below. The sea surface reflects the radar signal away from the satellite, making water appear dark in the image, while cities on the island are visible in white owing to the strong reflection of the radar signal.

Crete extends for approximately 260 km from west to east, and is approximately 60 km across at its widest point. Crete is known for its rugged terrain and is dominated by a high mountain range crossing from west to east. This includes the Lefká Ori, or ‘White Mountains’ in the west, Mount Ida, Crete’s highest mountain, visible in the centre of the island, and the Díkti Mountains in the east.  Crete’s capital and largest city of the island, Heraklion, is located along the northern coastline.

Several other smaller islands are dotted around the image, including Gavdos, Chrisi and Dia.

Unbeknown to many, the island of Crete plays an important role in the Copernicus satellite altimetry constellation and on an international stage. Satellite altimetry data have to be continuously monitored at the ESA Permanent Facility for Altimetry Calibration (PFAC) where different techniques have pioneered the use of transponders linked to international metrology standards to provide the best measurements to validate satellite altimeters in space soon after launch.

This PFAC network has been operating for around two decades, with a main calibration validation station located on the island of Gavdos and a dedicated transponder site in the Cretan mountains. A transponder receives, amplifies and re-transmits the radar pulse back to the radar altimeter in space where the signal is recorded. The transponder measurements are used to determine the range and datation of the satellite altimeter data in a unique manner – something that is very difficult to achieve on the ground.

Western Crete was identified as a unique location for the inter-comparison of satellite altimeters owing to its unique positioning of the Copernicus Sentinel-3 and Sentinel-6 orbit crossing points.

The sea surrounding the island has minimal tides, and the rugged mountainous landscape means that the transponder signals can be measured from space with little interference, but most importantly, in the sky above it, a number of satellites in orbit converge. This allows each satellite flying above to be cross-calibrated with the next one at one specific meeting point using the same instrumentation.

The Fiducial Reference Measurements for Sentinel-6 is the latest activity designed to bring the full power of the PFAC to check the performance of the upcoming Copernicus Sentinel-6 Michael Freilich satellite – the next radar altimetry reference mission extending the legacy of sea-surface height measurements until at least 2030.

Every 10 days, Sentinel-6 will provide sufficient measurements to map the sea-surface height of the ocean from which sea-level rise can be computed. As part of the ESA contribution to the long-term verification and validation of both Sentinel-3 and Sentinel-6 missions, the PFAC is being extended with a second transponder to be installed on Gavdos Island, southwest of Crete, as seen in the Sentinel-1 radar image.  This gives the ‘big picture’ allowing us to chart the sea level with confidence.
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 11/13/2020 09:50 am
Darmstadt, Germany

13/11/2020

The Copernicus Sentinel-2 mission takes us over Darmstadt – home to ESA’s European Space Operations Centre.

The image pictured here shows the Frankfurt Rhine-Main region in south-central Germany. With a population of almost six million people, the region includes the main cities of Frankfurt, Wiesbaden, Offenbach and Darmstadt.

Frankfurt, Germany’s fifth-largest city, is visible at the top of the image, located on both sides of the Main River. The southern part of the city contains the Frankfurt City Forest, the largest inner-city forest in Germany, visible in dark green. Frankfurt Airport can be easily spotted southwest of the city centre.

The Rhine River can be seen in the left of the image. The river flows for around 1230 km in a northerly direction through Germany and the Netherlands, before emptying into the North Sea. Darmstadt is located between the Rhine and the Odenwald, a forested plain in the bottom-right of the image. Darmstadt is often referred to as a ‘City of Science,’ as it’s a major centre of scientific institutions including ESA’s European Space Operations Centre (ESOC) and the European Organisation for the Exploitation of Meteorological Satellites (Eumetsat).

ESOC is home to the engineering teams that control spacecraft in orbit and across the Solar System. On 21 November, the Copernicus Sentinel-6 Michael Freilich ocean-monitoring satellite will launch on a Space X Falcon 9 rocket from California, US, and once safely in orbit, ESA’s ESOC Operations Centre will take over the reins.

Copernicus Sentinel-6 Michael Freilich will replace the Jason series of satellites currently providing data on Earth’s oceans. Over the subsequent days after launch, the Sentinel-6 mission control team will manoeuvre the satellite into its correct path, which will fly in tandem with the Jason-3 spacecraft it will replace, and then fall into position right behind it.

Once the Sentinel is through the critical early phase and drifts towards its target orbit, Eumetsat will complete the final ‘orbit acquisition’ and take on responsibility for commissioning, routine operations and distribution of the mission’s vital data.

Copernicus Sentinel-6 will join a fleet of Earth’s monitoring spacecraft in the low-Earth orbit – flying at a mean altitude of 1336 km. ESA’s Space Debris Office, also based at ESOC, will be on-hand through the critical early days, monitoring and calculating the risk of collisions with swirling space debris and advising on how to keep the mission safe.

This image, captured on 23 June 2020
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 11/20/2020 08:28 am
Vandenberg Air Force Base, California
20/11/2020

The Vandenberg Air Force Base, in California, US, where the Copernicus Sentinel-6 Michael Freilich satellite will soon launch from, is featured in this image captured by the Copernicus Sentinel-2 mission.

Zoom in to see this image at its full 10 m resolution.

The area pictured here shows the Santa Barbara County in the southern region of the US state of California. Located around 200 km northwest of Los Angeles, the county spans across 7000 sq km and is bordered by the Pacific Ocean to the west and south.

The county includes the coastal city of Santa Barbara, partially visible in the lower right of the image. Santa Barbara lies between the steeply rising Santa Ynez Mountains, visible in dark green directly above, and the Pacific Ocean. The mountains rise dramatically behind the city with several peaks exceeding 1200 m.

Other mountain ranges in the county include the San Rafael Mountains, visible directly above, and the Sierra Madre Mountains. Most of the mountainous area is within the Los Padres National Forest – California’s second largest national forest.

The county’s most populous city is Santa Maria, visible in the top left of the image, surrounded by a patchwork of agricultural plots. Like many other cities in California, Santa Maria experiences a Mediterranean climate.

Below Santa Maria lies the Vandenberg Air Force Base – visible along the coast. It is here, where the Copernicus Sentinel-6 Michael Freilich satellite will launch from. A joint European-US satellite built to monitor  sea levels, the satellite will liftoff atop a Space X Falcon 9 rocket on 21 November  at 18:17 CET (09:17 PST). The satellite, named after Michael Freilich, the former NASA director who advocated for advancing satellite measurements, will extend a nearly 30-year continuous dataset on sea level.

It will be the first ESA-developed satellite to be given a ride into space on the SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket. Famously, Falcon 9 is partially reusable – unlike most rockets which are expendable launch systems. Once in orbit some 1336 km above Earth, the Sentinel-6 Michael Freilich satellite will collect sea level measurements for 95% of Earth’s ice-free oceans. The data will be essential for climate science, policy-making and protecting those in low-lying regions.

Tune in to ESA Web TV at 17:45 CET to watch the launch live.

This image, captured on 14 August 2020
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 11/27/2020 09:15 am
Kiruna, Sweden

27/11/2020

Kiruna, the northernmost town in Sweden, is featured in this snowy image captured by the Copernicus Sentinel-2 mission.

Kiruna, visible in darker tones just left of the centre in the image, is located in the county of Norrbotten and is around 145 km north of the Arctic Circle. The city, with a population of around 22 000 inhabitants, is on the eastern shore of Lake Luossa (Luossajärvi), between the iron-ore Kiruna (Kiirunavaara) and Luossa (Luossavaara) mountains.

Around 20 km east of Kiruna, the small town of Jukkasjärvi is visible, and is best known for its annual ice hotel constructed from snow and ice blocks taken from the nearby Torne River. Thin, dark lines cutting across the image are roads that connect the towns with other parts of Sweden.

At a latitude of almost 68°, around 40 km east of Kiruna, lies ESA’s Kiruna ground station, which in September 2020 celebrated 30 years of space excellence. The station is hard to spot, but is located in the centre-right of the image, just above a dark lake.

Ideally positioned to support polar-orbiting missions, the station is a crucial gateway for much of the data enabling us to study our planet’s oceans, water and atmosphere, forecast weather and understand the rapid advance of climate change.

Kiruna ground station is part of the Agency’s tracking station network – Estrack – a worldwide network linking satellites in orbit and across the Solar System with ESA’s Space Operations Centre, ESOC, in Darmstadt, Germany. The station features two sophisticated terminals with 15 m and 13 m-diameter antennas to communicate with satellites in Earth’s orbit, including CryoSat, Swarm, Copernicus Sentinel-1 and the recently-launched Sentinel-6 Michael Freilich satellite.

While the North Pole Satellite Station in Alaska caught the spacecraft’s first signals from space after separation from the launcher, the Kiruna ground station tracked the satellite’s first days. Eumetsat then completed the final ‘orbit acquisition,’ taking over responsibility for commissioning, routine operations and distribution of the mission’s vital data.

While Sentinel-6 is one of the European Union’s family of Copernicus missions, its implementation is the result of the unique collaboration between ESA, NASA, Eumetsat and NOAA, with contribution from the French space agency CNES.

This image, captured on 27 May 2020
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 11/27/2020 09:17 am
Iceberg A-68A: hit or miss?

26/11/2020

An enormous iceberg, called A-68A, has made headlines over the past weeks as it drifts towards South Georgia in the Southern Ocean. New images, captured by the Copernicus Sentinel-1 mission, show the berg is rotating and potentially drifting westwards.

In July 2017, the lump of ice, more than twice the size of Luxembourg, broke off Antarctica’s Larsen C ice shelf – spawning one of the largest icebergs on record. Now, three years later, the A68A berg is being carried by currents in open waters – thousands of kilometres from its birthplace.

The Copernicus Sentinel-1 mission’s latest acquisition, captured on 25 November, shows the berg’s eastern tip is now just 255 km from South Georgia. If the iceberg were to reach the island’s shores, it could potentially ground in the shallow waters offshore and threaten wildlife, including penguins, seals and krill.

As these animals need access to the sea to feed, the iceberg could easily block their foraging routes – preventing them from feeding their young. It could also disturb the ecosystem below by crushing animal and plant life on the seafloor.

Satellite missions are being used to track the berg on its journey over the past three years. The Sentinel-1 radar mission, with its ability to see through clouds and the dark, has been instrumental in mapping the polar regions in winter.
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 12/04/2020 09:40 am
Banks Peninsula, New Zealand
04/12/2020

The Copernicus Sentinel-2 mission takes us over the Banks Peninsula on the South Island of New Zealand.

Banks Peninsula, visible in the bottom-right of the image, consists of two overlapping extinct volcanoes: the Lyttelton Volcano and the Akaroa Volcano. The peninsula was formed by several volcanic eruptions that took place around eight million years ago. The name of the peninsula comes from Sir Joseph Banks, a British biologist who sailed with Captain Cook.

Breaches in the crater walls led to the formation of two long, thin harbours: Lyttelton in the north and Akaroa in the south. The peninsula also has many other smaller bays and coves, giving it its unusual, cogwheel shape. Christchurch, the largest city on South Island, is visible immediately north of Banks Peninsula.

The jagged coastline heavily contrasts with the adjoining, flat Canterbury Plains. Extending around 80 km inland from the coast to the foothills of the Southern Alps, visible in the top-left of the image, the plains are a rich agricultural region known for wheat and barley, as well as wool and livestock.

The Rangitata, Rakaia and Waimakariri are the principal rivers visible in the image flowing southeast from the Southern Alps. The Rakaia river, visible in the centre of the image, is one of the largest braided rivers in New Zealand. The river travels for around 150 km before entering the Pacific Ocean. The turquoise colours visible in the ocean suggest the presence of sediment being carried into the ocean by river discharge, as well as algal blooms.

Between Rakaia river and the Banks Peninsula, lies Lake Ellesmere (Te Waihora). The lake is actually a shallow, coastal lagoon, with its emerald green colours most likely due to a high concentration of chlorophyll. The long stretch of land, visible in brown south of the lagoon, is the Kaitorete Spit and is a barrier that separates the lagoon from the Pacific Ocean.

Sentinel-2 is a two-satellite mission to supply the coverage and data delivery needed for Europe’s Copernicus programme. The mission’s frequent revisits over the same area and high spatial resolution allow changes in inland water bodies to be closely monitored.

Image captured on 4 January 2019
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 12/11/2020 09:25 am
Kyiv, Ukraine
11/12/2020

The Copernicus Sentinel-2 mission takes us over Kyiv – the capital and most populous city of Ukraine.

Kyiv, also spelled Kiev, is visible just below the centre of the image, along the Dnieper River in north-central Ukraine. The city covers a total area of around 840 sq km and is home to approximately three million people. 

Originally just on the west bank, today the city of Kyiv spreads across both sides of the Dnieper River, which flows southwards through the city. The Dnieper is the fourth-longest river in Europe, after the Volga, Danube and Ural rivers. It rises on the southern slopes of the Valdai Hills of Russia and flows in a southerly direction through western Russia, Belarus and Ukraine to the Black Sea.

Directly above the city of Kyiv is the Kyiv Reservoir – a large water reservoir which is 110 km in length and 12 km in width. The reservoir is mainly used for irrigation, hydroelectricity generation and industrial and public consumption.

The neon green colours in the Kyiv Reservoir indicate a high quantity of algae. Algal blooms are dense layers of microscopic plants that occur on the surface of lakes, or other bodies of water, when there is an overabundance of nutrients on which algae depend. These high levels of nutrients are often caused by human pollution, such as wastewater or fertiliser runoff from agriculture.

Owing to Ukraine’s climate and arable land, agriculture plays a large role in the country’s economy. Large, agricultural plots dominate this week’s image, with corn, wheat and barley being the country’s main crops. With over 40 million hectares of agricultural land covering 70% of the country, agriculture is Ukraine’s largest export industry.

Copernicus Sentinel-2 is a two-satellite mission. Each satellite carries a high-resolution camera that images Earth’s surface in 13 spectral bands. The mission is mostly used to track changes in the way land is being used and to monitor the health of our vegetation.
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 12/18/2020 08:55 am
Rovaniemi, Lapland
18/12/2020

The Copernicus Sentinel-1 mission takes us over Lapland, the largest and northernmost region of Finland, just in time for Christmas.

Located within the Arctic Circle, Lapland, also called Sápmi by the Sami people, stretches across northern Norway, Sweden and Finland, and into the Kola Peninsula of Russia. It is bound by the Norwegian Sea on the west, the Barents Sea on the north, and the White Sea to the east.

Lapland during the winter months means snowfall, temperatures well below zero degrees and the Northern Lights, or the Aurora Borealis, lighting up the dark, night skies. Rovaniemi, the capital of Lapland, lies at the top of the image, and is considered the official hometown of Santa Claus.

In Rovaniemi, the Arctic Circle runs through Santa Claus Village, located eight kilometres north of the city centre. The Arctic Circle marks the southernmost latitude where the sun can stay continuously below or above the horizon for 24 hours – these phenomena are known as the Midnight Sun in the summer and the Polar Night in the winter.

This image combines three radar acquisitions from the Copernicus Sentinel-1 mission to show changes in land conditions over time. The first image from 28 February 2019 is associated with green, the second from 11 March is linked to red, and the third from 04 April depicts changes in blue.

The changes that took place over time in this image are largely seen in the bottom-left of the image, where sea ice in the Gulf of Bothnia has shifted substantially along the coast. The Gulf of Bothnia,  the northernmost arm of the Baltic Sea, is situated between Finland’s west coast and Sweden’s east coast. As it receives the water of so many rivers, including the Torne and Kemijoki rivers visible in the image, its salinity is extremely low, and ice cover is maintained for up to five months during the winter.

There are many small islands, making navigation in the gulf difficult. For this reason, vessels travelling in the gulf receive icebreaker assistance on their journey in the ice-covered waters, and follow the straight lines easing their navigation. Straight lines can be seen coming from the Port of Röyttä and the Port of Ajos.

As an advanced radar mission, Copernicus Sentinel-1 can image the surface of Earth through cloud and rain and regardless of whether it is day or night – making it an ideal mission to monitor areas often shrouded in darkness like the polar regions.
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 01/12/2021 12:39 pm
Madrid snowbound
12/01/2021

Captured by the Copernicus Sentinel-2 mission on 11 January 2021 at 12:14 CET, this image of Madrid in Spain appears to have been taken in black and white. In fact, it is a true-colour image – but the heaviest snowfall in 50 years has blanketed the region, turning the landscape white.

Storm Filomena hit Spain over the weekend, blanketing parts of the country in thick snow and leaving half of the country on red alert. Madrid, one of the worst affected areas, was brought to a standstill with the airport having to be closed, trains cancelled and roads blocked.

Although this satellite image was taken after the storm had passed, it is clear to see that much snow still remains, especially in the outskirts of the city. For example, some runways at the airport, which is visible in the top-right of the image, are still covered by snow. The unusual cold weather on the Iberian Peninsula is expected to last until later this week with temperatures forecasted to plunge to –12°C. The race is on to clear roads so that supplies of essential goods such as food supplies and Covid vaccines can be delivered.

Copernicus Sentinel-2 is a two-satellite mission. Each satellite carries a high-resolution camera that images Earth’s surface in 13 spectral bands. Together they cover all Earth’s land surfaces, large islands, inland and coastal waters every five days at the equator.
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 01/15/2021 10:53 am
Tanezrouft Basin
15/01/2021

The Copernicus Sentinel-2 mission takes us over the Tanezrouft Basin – one of the most desolate parts of the Sahara Desert.

Tanezrouft is a region of the Sahara lying in southern Algeria and northern Mali. The hyperarid area is known for its soaring temperatures and scarce access to water and vegetation, a reason why it’s often referred to as the ‘Land of Terror’. There are no permanent residents that live here, only occasional Tuareg nomads.

The barren plain extends to the west of the Hoggar mountains and southeast of the sandy Erg Chech. The terrain shows evidence of water erosion that occurred many years ago, when the Sahara Desert’s climate was much wetter, as well as wind erosion caused by frequent sandstorms – exposing ancient folds in the Paleozoic rocks.

The region is characterised by dark sandstone hills, steep canyon walls, salt flats (visible in white in the image), stone plateaus and seas of multi-storey sand dunes known as ‘ergs’. Concentric rings of exposed sandstone strata create a stunning pattern predominantly visible in the left of the image.

White lines in the right of the image are roads that lead to In Salah – the capital of the In Salah Province and In Salah District. Just above the centre-left of the image, an airstrip can be seen. An interesting, grid-like pattern can be seen in the bottom of the image and mostly consists of human-made clearings and roads.
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 01/22/2021 11:21 am
Sardinia, Italy
22/01/2021

Sardinia, the second-largest island in the Mediterranean Sea, is featured in this false-colour image captured by the Copernicus Sentinel-2 mission.

Sardinia (also known as Sardegna) is situated between the Mediterranean Sea to the west and south and the Tyrrhenian Sea to the east. The island sits 200 km west of the Italian Peninsula, 200 km north of Tunisia and around 12 km south of the French island of Corsica, partially visible in the top of the image.

This image, which uses data from 11 October to 14 October 2019, has been processed using the shortwave infrared band and the near infrared band to highlight dense vegetation. Crops and vegetation appear in bright green in the image, while bare soil can be seen in various shades of orange and brown.

Grasslands and croplands with a higher moisture content appear more vibrant in the image. As water is a strong absorber of infrared, inland water bodies are delineated and can be easily spotted in black. Much of the Sardinia’s arable land is devoted to cereal cultivation and fruit growing.

Sardinia is a mainly mountainous region, with its highest point Mount La Marmora in the Gennargentu massif visible in the centre-right of the image. With over 1800 km of coastline, Sardinia is internally renowned for its beaches including those along the Emerald Coast, or Costa Smeralda, Alghero and Villasimius. The coasts, particularly in the east, are high and rocky, with long stretches of coastline with bays, inlets and various smaller islands located off the coast.

The archipelago of La Maddalena, including the renowned islands of La Maddalena, Caprera and Santo Stefano, can be seen in the top-right of the image. Its islands are known for their pristine beaches and wild beauty. Cagliari, the island’s capital and largest city, lies on the southern coast of the island.
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 01/29/2021 08:23 am
Lake Titicaca
29/01/2021

Ahead of World Wetlands Day, the Copernicus Sentinel-2 mission takes us over Lake Titicaca – one of the largest lakes in South America.

Covering an area of around 8300 sq km, Lake Titicaca lies on the high Andes plateau and straddles the border between Peru (to the west) and Bolivia (to the east). It is considered the highest major body of navigable water in the world, as it sits at an elevation of 3800 m above sea level.

The lake extends approximately 190 km from northwest to southwest  and is 80 km across at its widest point. Tiquina, a narrow strait, actually separates the lake into two separate bodies of water. The larger subbasin in the northwest is called Lake Chucuito in Bolivia and Lake Grande in Peru, while the smaller in the southeast is referred to as Lake Huiñaymarca in Bolivia and Lake Pequeño in Peru.

Many rivers drain into the lake, including the Ramis, one of the largest, visible in the northwest corner of the lake. The smaller Desaguadero river drains the lake at its southern end, which then flows south through Bolivia. This outlet only accounts for a small percentage of the lake’s excess water, as the rest is lost by evaporation caused by persistent winds and intense sunlight.

Forty-one islands rise from Titicaca’s waters, the largest of which, Titicaca Island, or Isla del Sol in Spanish, can be seen just off the tip of the Copacabana Peninsula in Bolivia. Several green algal blooms can be seen in the lake, including in the lake’s northwest and southeast corners. Snow in the Andes mountain range can be seen in the top-right of the image.

Lake Titicaca is a designated Ramsar Site of International Importance, as the waters of Titicaca are essential to the wellbeing of millions of people who rely on the lake for agriculture, fishing and tourism, as well as water birds and animals that live along and on its shores.

The 2 February marks the anniversary of the signing of the Convention on Wetlands of International Importance, known as the Ramsar Convention, in Ramsar, Iran in 1971. World Wetlands Day aims to raise global awareness about the vital role of wetlands for our planet and population.

From their vantage point of 800 km high, Earth-observing satellites provide data and imagery on wetlands that can be used to monitor and manage these precious resources sustainably. For example, both the Copernicus Sentinel-2 and Sentinel-3 missions have recently been used to monitor the variation of chlorophyll concentrations in the lake and help detect trends and hotspots over time.
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 02/05/2021 12:44 pm
Japan in bloom
05/02/2021

The Copernicus Sentinel-2 mission takes us over the algal blooms swirling around the Pacific Ocean, just off the coast of Japan.

Algae blooms refer to the rapid multiplying of phytoplankton – microscopic marine plants that drift on or near the surface of the sea. Excessive algal growth, or algal blooms, can become visible to the naked eye and collectively tint ocean waters, allowing us to detect these tiny organisms from space.

Although algal blooms are a natural and essential part of life in the sea, human activity is also said to increase the number of annual blooms. Harmful algal blooms can be stimulated by environmental factors, such as light, warmer water temperatures and excessive nutrients.

In the image pictured here, captured on 14 June 2019, high concentrations of algae can be seen around 130 km off Hokkaido Island, the second largest island of Japan. This particular algal bloom measured more than 500 km across and 200 km wide, with the area pictured here showing just a small portion of the bloom, around 100 km from north to south and around 110 km from east to west.

During the spring bloom season, nutrients such as nitrates and phosphates are more abundant in the surface waters. Without direct in situ measurements, it is difficult to distinguish the type of algae that cover the ocean here. Algae is then usually carried by winds and currents closer to the coast of Japan.

It is in this part of the Pacific Ocean, near Hokkaido, where the colder Oyashio Current converges from the north with the warmer Kuroshio Current, which flows from the south. When two currents with different temperatures and densities collide, they often create eddies – swirls of water drifting along the edge of the two water masses. The phytoplankton growing atop the surface waters become concentrated along the boundaries of these eddies and trace out the motions of the water.

Phytoplankton play an important role in the food chain, but they also have an impact on the global carbon cycle by absorbing carbon dioxide on a scale equivalent to that of terrestrial plants. Primary production is often used to describe the synthesis of organic material from carbon dioxide and water through photosynthesis.  Even small variations in primary productivity can affect carbon dioxide concentrations, as well as influencing biodiversity and fisheries.

As ocean surfaces warm in response to increasing atmospheric greenhouse gases, phytoplankton productivity will need to be monitored both consistently and systematically.

Satellite data can not only be used to track the growth and spread of harmful algae blooms in order to alert and mitigate against damaging impacts for tourism and fishing industries, but have also recently proven fundamental to providing a global view of phytoplankton and their role in, and response to, climate change.
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 02/14/2021 10:22 am
Netherlands in white
11/02/2021

As this image captured today, 11 February, by Copernicus Sentinel-3 shows, the Netherlands remains pretty much snow-covered thanks to days of sub-zero temperatures following the country’s first major snowstorm in a decade.

Storm Darcy hit the Netherlands in the evening of Saturday 6 February as it pushed its way through much of northern Europe. Strong winds and bitter cold, which initiated a ‘code red’ weather warning, brought the country to an almost standstill as most public transport was cancelled the following day – by which time most of the country was under around 10 cm of snow. The snowfall also caused disruption to parts of the UK and Germany.

Although the snow stopped falling a day or so later, temperatures have remained below freezing, reawakening the Dutch passion for ice-skating. The Netherlands is home to the century-old ‘Elfstedentocht’, a 200-kilometre race on natural ice through 11 towns and cities in the northern province of Friesland. It was last held in 1997, but the current Covid pandemic restrictions mean that this historic race, which can attract thousands of participants and hundreds of thousands of spectators, is not permitted this year.

Climate change is thought to be having an impact on the chances of conditions being right for an Elfstedentocht – the canal ice has to be at least 15 cm thick. According to the Dutch Meteorological Institute, KNMI, a century ago, there was a 20% chance every year of it being cold enough to organise the race, this has now decreased to an 8% chance.

Copernicus Sentinel-3 is a two-satellite mission to supply the coverage and data delivery needed for Europe’s Copernicus environmental monitoring programme. Each satellite carries the same suite of four sensors. This image, showing snow cover in the Netherlands, northern France, Belgium, Luxembourg, Denmark, part of the UK and part of Germany, was captured by the mission’s ocean and land cover instrument.
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 02/19/2021 08:23 am
Lusaka, Zambia
19/02/2021

The Copernicus Sentinel-2 mission takes us over Lusaka – the capital and largest city of Zambia.

Lusaka, visible at the top of the image, is located on a high plateau in south-central Africa with an elevation of around 1200 m. With a population of over 2 million people, Lusaka is one of the fastest developing cities in southern Africa. Lusaka National Park is easily identifiable as a brown patch of land just southeast of the city. The 6700 hectare park hosts a variety of rare and endangered animals.

Owing to Zambia’s humid sub-tropical climate, agriculture is the country’s main source of income and jobs. The circular shapes in the image, visible mostly southwest of Lusaka in light green, are an example of pivot irrigation, or centre-pivot irrigation systems. This type of irrigation functions where equipment rotates around a central pivot and crops are fed with water from the centre of the arc.

Water from the nearby Kafue River, visible cutting across the image from left to right, is used for irrigation and hydroelectric power. At 1600 km long, the Kafue River is the longest river lying solely within Zambia. The river flows across the flat plain called Kafue Flats (also known as Butwa) and meanders in a maze of swampy channels and lagoons.

The flats, visible in dark brown in the far-left of the image, are a shallow flood plain around 240 km long and about 50 km wide, and are usually flooded to a depth of less than one metre in the rainy season.

From here, the Kafue River continues its journey southeast, flowing through the Kafue Gorge before finally joining the Zambezi River, visible in the bottom-right of the image, near Chirundu, Zimbabwe.

Data from the Copernicus Sentinel-2 mission can help monitor changes in urban expansion, land-cover change and agriculture monitoring. The mission’s frequent revisits over the same area and high spatial resolution also allow changes in inland water bodies to be closely monitored.

This image, which was captured on 29 July 2019
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 02/19/2021 01:01 pm
https://twitter.com/esa/status/1362759642674319360?s=20
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 02/26/2021 09:58 am
Vancouver, Canada
26/02/2021

The Copernicus Sentinel-2 mission takes us over Vancouver – the third largest city in Canada.

Vancouver, visible at the top of the image, lies between Burrard Inlet, an arm of the Strait of Georgia, to the north, and the Fraser River delta to the south. Vancouver has the highest population density in Canada, with over 5400 people per square kilometre, making it the fifth-most densely populated city in North America.

In this image, captured on 29 July 2019, an unusually large quantity of sediment can be seen gushing from the Fraser River into the Strait of Georgia. The Fraser River is the longest river within British Columbia rising at Fraser Pass in the Rocky Mountains and flows for over 1300 km before emptying into the strait. The rivers’ annual discharge at its mouth is estimated to be around 3550 cubic metres per second, and is said to discharge around 20 million tonnes of sediment into the ocean.

Several ships and vessels can be easily spotted at the top of the image, in the Burrard Inlet, which separates the city of Vancouver from the slopes of the North Shore Mountains (not visible).

Vancouver Island dominates the left-side of the image. Covering an area of over 31 000 sq km, it is the largest island on the Pacific coast of North America. The island is heavily wooded and mountainous with several peaks of more than 2100 m.

At the bottom of the image, marine stratocumulus clouds can be seen over the Strait of Juan de Fuca, which also marks the international boundary between Canada and the Unites States. These types of cloud formations could be related to the Puget Sound Convergence Zone – a frequent weather phenomena where northwest winds are split by the Olympic Mountains and then re-converge over Puget Sound, visible in the bottom-right of the image.

Copernicus Sentinel-2 is a two-satellite mission. Each satellite carries a high-resolution camera that images Earth’s surface in 13 spectral bands. The mission is mostly used to track changes in the way land is being used and to monitor the health of our vegetation.
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 03/02/2021 09:07 am
Giant iceberg breaks off Brunt Ice Shelf in Antarctica
02/03/2021

A giant iceberg, approximately 1.5 times the size of Greater Paris, broke off from the northern section of Antarctica’s Brunt Ice Shelf on Friday 26th February. New radar images, captured by the Copernicus Sentinel-1 mission, show the 1270 sq km iceberg breaking free and moving away rapidly from the floating ice shelf.

Glaciologists have been closely monitoring the many cracks and chasms that have formed in the 150 m thick Brunt Ice Shelf over the past years. In late-2019, a new crack was spotted in the portion of the ice shelf north of the McDonald Ice Rumples, heading towards another large crack near the Stancomb-Wills Glacier Tongue.

This latest rift was closely monitored by satellite imagery, as it was seen quickly cutting across the ice shelf. Recent ice surface velocity data derived from Sentinel-1 data indicated the region north of the new crack to be the most unstable – moving around 5 m per day. Then, in the early hours of Friday 26th, the newer crack widened rapidly before finally breaking free from the rest of the floating ice shelf.

ESA’s Mark Drinkwater said, “Although the calving of the new berg was expected and forecasted some weeks ago, watching such remote events unfold is still captivating. Over the following weeks and months, the iceberg could be entrained in the swift south-westerly flowing coastal current, run aground or cause further damage by bumping into the southern Brunt Ice Shelf. So we will be carefully monitoring the situation using data provided by the Copernicus Sentinel-1 mission.”

Although currently unnamed, the iceberg has been informally dubbed ‘A-74’. Antarctic icebergs are named from the Antarctic quadrant in which they were originally sighted, then a sequential number, then, if the iceberg breaks, a sequential letter.

The calving does not pose a threat to the presently unmanned British Antarctic Survey’s Halley VI Research Station, which was re-positioned in 2017 to a more secure location after the ice shelf was deemed unsafe.

Routine monitoring by satellites offer unprecedented views of events happening in remote regions like Antarctica, and how ice shelves manage to retain their structural integrity in response to changes in ice dynamics, air and ocean temperatures. The Copernicus Sentinel-1 mission carries radar, which can return images regardless of day or night and this allows us year-round viewing, which is especially important through the long, dark, austral winter months.
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 03/05/2021 08:48 am
Galápagos Islands
05/03/2021

The Copernicus Sentinel-2 mission takes us over the Galápagos Islands – a volcanic archipelago situated some 1000 km west of Ecuador in the Pacific Ocean.

The archipelago consists of 13 major islands and a handful of smaller islands and islets scattered across approximately 60 000 sq km of ocean. Repeated volcanic eruptions and ongoing seismic activity have helped form the rugged mountain landscape of the islands. In this image, captured on 23 September 2020, several circular volcanic cones can be seen atop the islands.

The largest island of the archipelago, Isabela (Albemarle), is visible in the centre. Around 132 km in length, the island’s seahorse shape is the result of the merging of multiple large volcanoes into a single land mass. The five volcanoes seen on the island are (from north to south): Wolf Volcano, Darwin Volcano, Alcedo Volcano, Sierra Negra Volcano and Cerro Azul Volcano. Two of the island’s volcanoes, Ecuador and Wolf, lie directly on the Equator.

At the southern end of the island, hills covered with forests can be seen in bright green, separating the Sierra Negra, the most active of the Galapagos volcanoes, from the sandy coastline (partially visible here owing to cloud cover). Tortuga Island, named for its distinct shape, can be seen southeast from Isabela. The tiny island is actually a collapsed volcano that is a nesting location for a variety of seabirds.

The second largest island of the archipelago, Santa Cruz, can be seen to the right of Isabela. Its capital, Puerto Ayora (not visible), is the most populated urban centre in the islands.

The Galápagos Islands are best known for their diverse array of plant and animal species, many of which are endemic meaning they are not found anywhere else in the world. These include the giant Galapagos tortoise, the marine iguana, the flightless cormorant and the Galapagos penguin – the only species of penguin that lives north of the equator.

These species were observed by Charles Darwin during the voyage of the HMS Beagle in 1835 and inspired his theory of evolution by natural selection. To preserve the unique wildlife on the islands, the Ecuadorian government made the entire archipelago a national park in 1959.

Copernicus Sentinel-2 is a two-satellite mission. Each satellite carries a high-resolution camera that images Earth’s surface in 13 spectral bands. The mission is mostly used to track changes in the way land is being used and to monitor the health of our vegetation.
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 03/12/2021 08:56 am
Earth from Space: Strait of Gibraltar
12/03/2021

The Strait of Gibraltar is featured in this false-colour image captured by the Copernicus Sentinel-2 mission.


The Strait of Gibraltar connects the Mediterranean Sea with the Atlantic Ocean and separates southernmost Spain from northernmost Africa. The channel is 58 km long and narrows to 13 km in width between Point Marroquí (Spain) and Point Cires (Morocco). Ferries and vessels can be seen travelling across the strait and crossing between the two continents.

This false-colour image, captured on 28 October 2020, was processed in a way that included the near-infrared channel. This type of band combination from Copernicus Sentinel-2 is most commonly used to assess plant density and health, as plants reflect near-infrared and green light, while absorbing red. Since they reflect more near-infrared than green, dense, plant-covered land appears in bright red.

Water bodies, such as the Mediterranean Sea and the Atlantic Ocean, appear in dark blue or black while turbid waters, such as those visible along the Spanish coast in the top-left of the image, appear in cyan or light blue. This is most likely due to sediment-laden waters flowing from rivers into the sea. Inland water bodies, such as the Barbate Reservoir visible at the top of the image, can be spotted in various shades of azure owing to their turbidity.

Several prominent cities can be seen in the image in grey. These include Tangier, the port and principal city of northern Morocco which lies just 27 km from the southern tip of Spain. Tétouan lies along the Martil Valley and can be seen in the bottom-right of the image. Its medina is a designated UNESCO World Heritage site since 1997.

At the southern end of the Iberian Peninsula, the Bay of Gibraltar can be seen. The shoreline is densely populated and the shore is divided, from west to east, between the Spanish municipalities of Algeciras, Los Barrios, San Roque, La Línea de la Concepción and the British Overseas Territory of Gibraltar.

Copernicus Sentinel-2 is a two-satellite mission. Each satellite carries a high-resolution camera that images Earth’s surface in 13 spectral bands. The mission is mostly used to track changes in the way land is being used and to monitor the health of vegetation.
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 03/26/2021 12:50 pm
Gariep Dam, South Africa

26/03/2021

The Gariep Dam, the largest dam in South Africa, is featured in this false-colour image captured by the Copernicus Sentinel-2 mission.

The Gariep Dam, visible in the bottom right of the image, lies along the Orange River, bordering the Free State and Eastern Cape provinces. The dam’s primary purpose is for irrigation, domestic and industrial use as well as power generation. The wall of the Gariep Dam, which is around 88 m high and 900 m long, holds back the Gariep Reservoir and, when full, the reservoir covers an area of around 360 sq km.

This image has been processed in a way that highlights vegetation in shades of green and water bodies in black. The water on the east side of the Gariep Dam appears in royal blue owing to a large quantity of sediments coming from the Orange River, therefore appearing brighter than the water flowing out of the west side of the dam.

The Orange River plays an important role in the South African economy by providing water for irrigation and hydroelectric power. It rises in the Drakensberg mountains in Lesotho, flowing westwards through South Africa to the Atlantic Ocean.

The river is said to be one of the world’s most turbid, and is estimated to deliver around 60 million tonnes of sediment each year to the western margin of South Africa. A significant quantity of this sediment is believed to be from soil erosion, an increasing environmental threat to sustainability in southern Africa.

The bright green circular shapes along the Orange River are an example of centre-pivot irrigation systems, where equipment rotates around a centre pivot and crops are fed with water from the centre of the arc.

The rest of the image is dominated by bare soil and rocky terrain which appear in different shades of pink and red. Straight lines in the image are roads which connect this area to other parts of South Africa.

The true-colour image can be seen in the left below, while the false-colour image can be seen on the right.

On the northern shore of the dam lies the Gariep Dam Nature Reserve, home to the largest number of Springbok in the country as well as other animals such as zebras, black wildebeest and ostrich.

In the left of the image lies the Doornkloof Nature Reserve, at the southern shore of the Vanderkloof Dam (not visible). The reserve is home to kudu, brown hyena and around 170 bird species.

Data from the Copernicus Sentinel-2 mission can help monitor changes in urban expansion, land-cover change and agriculture monitoring. The mission’s frequent revisits over the same area and high spatial resolution also allow changes in inland water bodies to be closely monitored.
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 03/26/2021 02:42 pm
Suez Canal traffic jam seen from space

26/03/2021

The enormous Ever Given container ship, wedged in Egypt’s Suez Canal, is visible in new images captured by the Copernicus Sentinel-1 mission.

The giant container ship ran aground in the canal on 23 March on its journey from China to the Netherlands. The image on the left, captured on 21 March, shows routine maritime traffic in the canal with vessels visible every 2 to 3 km. The image on the right, captured on 25 March, shows the 400 m-ship blocking the canal.

The canal connects Port Said on the Mediterranean Sea to the Indian Ocean via the Egyptian city of Suez on the Red Sea. The blockage has delayed hundreds of tankers and vessels in reaching their destination, and more maritime traffic is still heading to the crucial waterway. Ships can be seen accumulating in the Gulf of Suez.

Tug boats are working hard to dislodge the 200 000 tonne ship, however Egyptian authorities say it is unclear when the route will reopen.

The two identical Copernicus Sentinel-1 satellites carry radar instruments to provide an all-weather, day-and-night supply of imagery of Earth’s surface, making it ideal to monitor ship traffic.

The sea surface reflects the radar signal away from the satellite, and makes water appear dark in the image. This contrasts with metal objects, in this case the ships in the bay, which appear as bright dots in the dark waters.
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 04/02/2021 09:50 am
Earth from Space: Easter egg hunt
02/04/2021

With Easter right around the corner, we take a look at four egg-shaped buildings visible from space as captured by the Copernicus Sentinel-2 mission.

Eggs are an ancient symbol of new life, associated with pagan festivals celebrating spring. Decorating eggs for Easter is a tradition that dates back to the 13th century. One explanation suggests that eggs were formerly a forbidden food during Lent, so people would decorate them to mark the end of penance and fasting, and eat them on Easter as a celebration.

The appetite for eggs is also apparent in modern-day architecture and design. In recent years, several egg-shaped structures have popped up in cities across the world. Here are just a few visible from space.


AT&T Stadium, US

In the top-left image, the AT&T Stadium in Arlington, Dallas, US, is visible. The stadium serves as the home of the Dallas Cowboys of the National Football League (NFL), but it’s also used for a variety of other activities including concerts, basketball and football games. The stadium seats 80 000, making it the fourth largest stadium in the NFL by seating capacity. Once known for its cotton ginning and agriculture, Arlington is primarily an industrial and commercial centre.

Beijing South Train Station, China

In the top-right, the Beijing South Train Station in the Fengtai District, Beijing, can be seen. The station is one of the city’s largest stations, and is one of the largest in Asia. It serves as the terminus for high-speed trains on the Beijing–Tianjin intercity railway and Beijing–Shanghai high-speed Railway which can reach speeds up to 350 km/h.

The station was built from more than 60 000 tonnes of steel and more than 490 000 cubic metres of concrete.  To understand the enormity of the station, the main hall in the centre is big enough to accommodate a Boeing 747 aircraft, and the covered surface area of the roof is about the size of 20 football fields.

Taipei Dome, Taiwan

In the bottom-left, the Taipei Dome, also known as the Farglory Dome, can be seen. The stadium is currently under construction in Xinyi, Taipei, Taiwan. Once completed, the stadium will be used mostly for baseball games, as well as other sporting events and commercial facilities.

Sapporo Dome, Japan

In the bottom-right, the Sapporo Dome stadium in Sapporo, Hokkaido Island, Japan, is visible. Primarily used for baseball and football games, the stadium is the home field of the Hokkaido Nippon-Ham Fighters baseball team and the Hokkaido Consadole Sapporo football club.

The stadium is equipped with a system that switches between two entirely different surfaces depending on which sport is being played. Baseball games are played on an underlying turf field, while football games are held on a grass pitch that slides in and out of the stadium as needed.

The stadium is one of the planned venues for this year’s Summer Olympics and was previously a venue of the 2002 FIFA World Cup.

Copernicus Sentinel-2 is a two-satellite mission. Each satellite carries a high-resolution camera that images Earth’s surface in 13 spectral bands. The mission is mostly used to track changes in the way land is being used and to monitor the health of our vegetation.
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 04/16/2021 11:37 am
Space Coast, Florida
16/04/2021

On 22 April 2021, on Earth Day, Thomas Pesquet is planned to return to the International Space Station for his second mission, Alpha. Ahead of his launch, the Copernicus Sentinel-2 mission takes us over Cape Canaveral, USA, in a region known as the Space Coast.

Zoom in to see this image at its full 10 m resolution or click on the circles to learn more about the features in it.

Cape Canaveral is a cape and city in Brevard County, in east-central Florida. The cape is separated from the mainland by the Banana River, Merritt Island and the Indian River from east to west.

The cape area is part of the region known as the Space Coast, and is home to the Kennedy Space Center – including the space shuttle landing facility, a visitor’s centre, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station and a space vehicle assembly building. Launch Complex 39A, visible along the coast, is where the Saturn V rocket carrying Apollo 11 began its voyage to the moon in 1969, carrying Neil Armstrong, Michael Collins, and Edwin ‘Buzz’ Aldrin.

Before the space programme was launched, Cape Canaveral was a stretch of barren, sandy scrubland. The cape was chosen for rocket launches owing to its close proximity to the equator. As the linear velocity of Earth’s surface is greatest towards the equator, the southerly location of the cape allows for rockets to take advantage of this by launching eastward – in the same direction as Earth’s rotation.

The space centre is included in the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, visible in the top of the image, which occupies more than 550 sq km of estuaries and marshes. It preserves the habitat of around 1000 plant and 500 wildlife species, included several endangered species. The city of Cape Canaveral lies just south of the space centre and around 8 km north of Cocoa Beach (visible in the bottom of the image).

It is from here where French ESA astronaut Thomas Pesquet will be launched on his second mission to the International Space Station. Thomas will be the first ESA astronaut to fly on a SpaceX Crew Dragon launching on a Falcon 9 rocket, together with NASA astronauts Shane Kimbrough and Megan McArthur and JAXA astronaut Akihiko Hoshide. He will be the first European to launch from the US since 2011, when Roberto Vittori, from Italy, flew onboard space shuttle Endeavour to deliver the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer.

During his six-month mission, called Alpha, Thomas will spend much of his time on scientific research and will also be carrying out maintenance tasks as part of the station’s crew. Towards the end of his mission, he will serve as commander of the Station. He will be the fourth European to hold the post of commander, after ESA astronauts Frank De Winne, Alexander Gerst and Luca Parmitano.

This image, captured on 2 February 2021
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 04/23/2021 08:35 am
Laizhou Bay, China
23/04/2021

The Copernicus Sentinel-2 mission takes us over the sediment-stained waters in Laizhou Bay, located on the southern shores of the Bohai Sea, on the east coast of mainland China.

The bay is the smallest of three main bays of the Bohai Sea, and is named after the city of Laizhou, visible to the east. Large quantities of sediment carried by the Yellow River, visible in the left of the image, discolour the waters of the bay and appear turquoise. This sediment can be seen throughout the waters in this image, even far from the coast.

The Yellow River is China’s second longest river, with a length of over 5400 km, and is surpassed only by the Yangtze River. The river rises in the Bayan Har Mountains in Western China and flows through nine provinces before emptying into the Laizhou Bay. Its drainage basin is the third largest in the country, with an area of around 750 000 sq km.

The river is estimated to carry 1.6 billion tonnes of silt annually, carrying the majority to the sea. Owing to this heavy load of silt, the Yellow River deposits soil in stretches, ultimately elevating the river bed. Excessive sediment deposits have raised the river bed several metres above the surrounding ground, sometimes causing damaging floods.

On the southern coast of Laizhou Bay, in the bottom of the image, flooded fields are visible and are most likely artificial fish farms. The city of Dongying, home to the second largest oilfield in China, is visible in the left of the image.

This image was processed in a way that included the near-infrared channel, which makes vegetation appear bright red. The lush vegetation can be distinguished from the brown fields in the image, which are unharvested or not yet fully grown.

Copernicus Sentinel-2 is a two-satellite mission. Each satellite carries a high-resolution camera that images Earth’s surface in 13 spectral bands. The mission is mostly used to track changes in the way land is being used and to monitor the health of vegetation.

This image, acquired on 26 February 2020
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 04/30/2021 08:29 am
Antofagasta, Chile
30/04/2021

Antofagasta, a port city in northern Chile, is featured in this image captured by the Copernicus Sentinel-2 mission.

Located around 1000 km north of Santiago, Antofagasta is the capital of both the Antofagasta Province and Region. The Antofagasta province borders the El Loa and Tocopilla provinces to the north and the Pacific Ocean to the west.

The city stretches approximately 22 km along the coast, snuggled between the ocean and the arid mountains to the east. The largest city in northern Chile, Antofagasta has a population of around 400 000 people. The city’s early growth resulted from the discovery of nitrate deposits in 1866, while today the economy is mainly based on the exploitation of various minerals such as copper and sulphur.

In the right of the image, large, emerald green geometric shapes are visible and are most likely evaporation ponds used in mining operations. These bright colours are in stark contrast with the surrounding desert landscape, which is largely devoid of vegetation, making them easily identifiable from space.

The city of Antofagasta is also a communications centre on the Pan-American Highway, visible as distinctive black lines in the right of the image, and is also linked by rail to the mines, as well as Bolivia and Argentina.

Antofagasta is located within the Atacama Desert which is considered one of the driest places on Earth, as there are some parts of the desert where rainfall has never been recorded. Antofagasta typically has a cold desert climate with abundant sunshine, with January being its warmest month.

This image, captured on 6 January 2021, shows little cloud cover over the city and surrounding area but strong westerly winds have created distinct wave patterns over the ocean – visible all the way from space.

This image was captured by the Copernicus Sentinel-2
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 05/07/2021 10:59 am
Morbihan, France
07/05/2021

The Copernicus Sentinel-2 mission takes us over Morbihan – a French department in the south of Brittany.

Brittany is an important cultural region in the northwest of France and is divided into four departments: Ille-et-Vilaine in the east, Côtes d'Armor in the north, Finistère in the west and Morbihan in the south.

Morbihan takes its name from ‘Mor-Bihan’ which means ‘little sea’ in the Breton language. The Gulf of Morbihan, visible in the centre of the image, is one of the most famous features of the coastline with numerous islands and islets. The gulf is around 20 km long from east to west and around 15 km wide from north to south. It opens onto the Bay of Quiberon by a narrow passage between Locmariaquer and Port-Navalo.

Many ships and vessels can be seen in the bay. Several islands are visible in the image, including the small islands of Houat and Hœdic and the large Belle Île, which is visible in the bottom-left of the image. Belle Île is known for the sharp cliff edges visible on the southwest side, but also for its beaches and renowned opera festival.

The town and sea port of Lorient is visible in the top-left of the image. The town is situated on the right bank of the Scorff River at its confluence with the Blavet on the Bay of Biscay. The island of Groix lies a few kilometres off Lorient. The island has high cliffs on its north coast and sandy beaches in secluded coves on the south coast.

Morbihan is also known for its ‘Alignements de Carnac’ which consists of rows of around 3000 standing stones and megalithic tombs. The stones were said to be erected during the Neolithic period, around 4500 BC. Most of the stones are within the Breton village of Carnac, but some to the east are within La Trinité-sur-Mer.

Fields dominate the French countryside as seen in this image captured on 13 September 2020. Brittany is known for its rich and varied agriculture including meats and dairy products, but also provides a variety of high quality fruit and vegetables including tomatoes, strawberries, peas and green beans.

The Copernicus Sentinel-2 mission is designed to provide images that can be used to distinguish between different crop types as well as data on numerous plant indices, such as leaf area, leaf chlorophyll and leaf water – all essential to monitor plant growth accurately.
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 05/15/2021 09:12 am
Qeshm Island, Iran
14/05/2021

The Copernicus Sentinel-2 mission takes us over Qeshm Island – the largest island in Iran.

Qeshm Island lies in the Strait of Hormuz, parallel to the Iranian coast from which it is separated by the Clarence Strait (Khuran). With an area of around 1200 sq km, the island has an irregular outline and shape often compared to that of an arrow. The island is approximately 135 km long and spans around 40 km at its widest point.

The image shows the largely arid land surfaces on both Qeshm Island and mainland Iran. The island generally has a rocky coastline except for the sandy bays and mud flats that fringe the northwest part of the island.

The Hara Forest Protected Area, a network of shallow waterways and forest, can be seen clearly in the image, between Qeshm Island and the mainland. Hara, which means ‘grey mangrove’ in the local language, is a large mangrove forest and protected area that brings more than 150 species of migrating birds during spring, including the great egret and the western reef heron. The forest also hosts sea turtles and aquatic snakes.

The dome-shaped Namakdan mountain is visible in the southwest part of the island and features the Namakdan Cave – one of the longest salt caves in the world. With a length of six kilometres, the cave is filled with salt sculptures, salt rivers and salt megadomes.

The water south of Qeshm Island appears particularly dark, while lighter, turquoise colours can be seen in the left of the image most likely due to shallow waters and sediment content. Several islands can be seen in the waters including Hengam Island, visible just south of Qeshm, Larak Island and Hormuz Island which is known for its red, edible soil.

Several cloud formations can be seen in the bottom-right of the image, as well as a part of the Musandam Peninsula, the northeastern tip of the Arabian Peninsula. The peninsula’s jagged coastline features fjordlike inlets called ‘khors’ and its waters are home to dolphins and other marine life.

Data from the Copernicus Sentinel-2 mission can help monitor changes in urban expansion, land-cover change and agriculture monitoring. The mission’s frequent revisits over the same area and high spatial resolution also allow changes in inland water bodies to be closely monitored.
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 05/21/2021 08:39 am
Los Cabos, Mexico
21/05/2021

The Copernicus Sentinel-2 mission takes us over Los Cabos – a municipality on the southern tip of Mexico's Baja California Peninsula.

Meaning ‘the capes’ in Spanish, Los Cabos is a region composed of mountains and coastal plains and is largely dry and rocky with over 320 days of sunshine each year. The area encompasses the two cities of Cabo San Lucas (visible in the bottom-left) and San José del Cabo (visible to the right).

The area along the coast between the two cities, often referred to as the Los Cabos Resort Corridor or simply the Corridor, stretches around 30 km along the highway and features a plethora of beaches dotted primarily with hotels, resorts and golf courses.

The peninsula ends with the Arch of Cabo San Lucas, known locally as ‘El Arco’ or ‘Land’s End.’ This distinctive land formation, carved by winds and waves, is where the Pacific Ocean meets the Gulf of California, also known as the Sea of Cortez.

The Arch of Cabo San Lucas is adjacent to Lovers Beach (Playa del Amor) on the Sea of Cortez side and Divorce Beach (Playa del Divorcio) on the rougher Pacific Ocean side. The arch is a popular gathering area for sea lions and is frequented by tourists.

A region of mountains dominate the landscape including the Sierra de la Laguna Mountain Range and the Sierra de San Lázaro, which are both formed of volcanic rock with peaks between 400 and 1000 m.

The main river in the area is the San José River, visible in the right of the image, and flows north to south primarily during the summer rainy season. The river creates an estuary at its southern end, which is one of the largest in Mexico and is home to both native and migratory birds.
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 05/28/2021 09:58 am
Great Lakes
28/05/2021

All five of North America’s Great Lakes are pictured in this spectacular image captured by the Copernicus Sentinel-3 mission: Lake Superior, Michigan, Huron, Erie, and Ontario.

The Great Lakes are a chain of deep freshwater lakes. With a combined area of around 244 000 sq km, the lakes represent the largest surface of freshwater in the world – covering an area exceeding that of the United Kingdom.

Around 100 000 years ago, a major ice sheet formed over most of Canada and part of the US. As it formed, giant glaciers flowed into the land carving out valleys and levelling mountains. As higher temperatures began to melt the ice sheet, meltwater filled the holes left by the glaciers.

Many of these holes today still contain water and formed the thousands of lakes across central USA and Canada. The biggest remnants of this process are the Great Lakes. The lakes drain roughly from west to east and empty into the Atlantic Ocean.

Lake Superior, the northernmost and westernmost lake, is the largest and deepest of the Great Lakes. It drains into Lake Huron via the St. Marys River at an average rate of 2000 cubic metres per second. Lake Michigan lies south of Lake Superior and connects with Lake Huron through the six km-wide channel Straits of Mackinac in the north. Lake Huron is the second largest of the Great Lakes and is bounded by Michigan, US, on the north and by Ontario, Canada, to the east.

Lake Erie is the shallowest and southernmost of the Great Lakes. Green algal blooms are visible on the lake. These toxic blooms have been a problem for the lake in recent years. Caused by heightened levels of phosphorus – found in fertilisers and common household products – finding its way into the water, these blooms have caused harm to the lake’s fish population.

Lake Ontario is the easternmost of the Great Lakes and also the smallest in surface area. It is bounded on the north by Ontario, Canada and on the south by New York, US, whose water boundaries meet in the middle of the lake.

In this image, captured on 15 March 2020, a large quantity of ice and snow coverage is visible north of the lakes, yet the amount of ice cover on the lakes is minimal – extremely unusual for the ice season which typically runs from 1 December through 30 April.

Parts of the Great Lakes typically freeze every winter. As Earth’s climate changes, rising air and water temperatures have led to less ice cover on many lakes in North America, including the Great Lakes. Ice cover on the Great Lakes can fluctuate dramatically from year to year, depending on several patterns of climate variability. Years with lower-than-normal ice cover appear to have become more frequent during the past two decades.

Sentinel-3 is a two-satellite mission to supply the coverage and data delivery needed for Europe’s Copernicus environmental monitoring programme. Each satellite’s instrument package includes an optical sensor to monitor changes in the colour of Earth’s surfaces. It can be used, for example, to monitor ocean biology and water quality.
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 06/18/2021 09:29 am
Tana River, Kenya

The Tana River, Kenya’s longest river, is featured in this false-colour image captured by the Copernicus Sentinel-2 mission.

The Tana River flows for around 1000 km from the Aberdare Mountains, west of Nyeri, running eastwards before veering south around the massif of Mount Kenya, and opening onto a wide valley, pictured here, where it meanders through a floodplain often subject to inundation. The river then continues its journey before entering the Indian Ocean at Formosa Bay, Kipini.

The river is known for its extraordinary biodiversity, as it provides water and life for wild animals, nomads and their livestock, as well as for agricultural purposes.

Some of the Tana’s tributaries as well as several smaller, seasonal rivers, known as lagas, that only flow during the rainy season, are visible flowing in an east-west direction in the image. The river beds support livestock and wildlife during the dry season owing to their ability to retain water.

This false-colour image, captured on 25 February 2020, was processed in a way that included the near-infrared channel. This type of band combination from Copernicus Sentinel-2 is most commonly used to assess plant density and health, as plants reflect near-infrared and green light, while absorbing red. Since they reflect more near-infrared than green, dense, plant-covered land appears in bright red.

It is easy to pick out the narrow band of riparian forest visible along the banks of the river in the image. The riparian forest usually thrives year-round, although its extent is highly dependent on seasonal flooding and ground water recharge by the Tana.

This image was captured during the area’s wet season, where the small tributaries of the Tana are highly visible and a significant amount of vegetation can be seen. If the image had been captured during the dry season (around June-September), the smaller tributaries and the vegetation growing around them would have dried up.

The river flows alongside the town of Garissa, the capital of Garissa County, and is visible as a greyish patch of land on the east side of the river. Around 5 km south of Garissa lies the Bour-Algi Giraffe Sanctuary, home to around 1000 giraffes and endangered wildlife including the Rothschild giraffe and gerenuk – a long-necked antelope found in the region.

Copernicus Sentinel-2 is a two-satellite mission. Each satellite carries a high-resolution camera that images Earth’s surface in 13 spectral bands. The mission is mostly used to track changes in the way land is being used and to monitor the health of vegetation.
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 06/25/2021 12:46 pm
Lake Mar Chiquita, Argentina
25/06/2021

The Copernicus Sentinel-1 mission takes us over Lake Mar Chiquita – an endorheic salt lake in the northeast province of Córdoba, Argentina.

Lake Mar Chiquita, around 70 km long and 24 km wide, is fed primarily by the Primero and Segundo rivers from the southwest and from the Dulce river from the north. While these rivers flow into the lake, there isn’t a natural outflow of water so it only loses water by evaporation, hence Lake Mar Chiquita being described as an endorheic lake. The lake’s surface area, as well as its salinity, varies considerably (ranging between 2000 and 6000 sq km), although it is slowly diminishing in size owing to evaporation.

Several small islands lie in the lake, the most important of which is El Médano. Vast expanses of saline marshes can be seen on the lake’s northern shore. The lake has been designated as a Ramsar Site of International Importance, and is considered one of the most important wetlands in Argentina owing to its rich biodiversity. Over 25 species of fish are known to breed in Lake Mar Chiquita, with fishing and livestock being the principal land uses.

The colours of this week’s image come from the combination of two polarisations from the Sentinel-1 radar mission, which have been converted into a single image.

As radar images provide data in a different way than a normal optical camera, the images are usually black and white when they are received. By using a technology that aligns the radar beams sent and received by the instrument in one orientation – either vertically or horizontally – the resulting data can be processed in a way that produces coloured images such as the one featured here. This technique allows scientists to better analyse Earth’s surface.

Shades of blue in the image show us where the differences between the two polarisations are higher, for example the saline marshes in the lake’s north, whereas the crops and agricultural fields in the surrounding area appear yellow, indicating fewer differences between polarisations. Fields, such as those visible in the bottom-left corner of the image, appear blue most likely because they are wetter. Several villages, including San Francisco and Rafaela, are identifiable in white in the bottom-right of the image.
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 07/01/2021 03:44 pm
Canada–US heatwave
01/07/2021

While heatwaves are quite common during the summer months, the scorching heatwave hitting parts of western Canada and the US has been particularly devastating – with temperature records shattered and hundreds of people falling victim to the extreme heat.

Canada broke its temperature record for a third consecutive day: recording a whopping 49.6°C on 29 June in Lytton, a village northeast of Vancouver, in British Columbia.

Portland, Oregon, also broke its all-time temperature record for three days in a row.

The extent of the heatwave can be seen in this map, which shows the land surface temperature of parts of Canada and the US on 29 June. The data show that surface temperatures in Vancouver reached 43°C, and Calgary and Portland recorded 43°C. The hottest temperatures recorded are in the state of Washington (visible in deep red) with maximum land surface temperatures of around 69°C.

The map has been generated using data from the Copernicus Sentinel-3 mission. While weather forecasts typically use air temperatures, the Sea and Land Surface Temperature Radiometer onboard Sentinel-3 measures the energy radiating from Earth’s surface. Therefore, the map shows the actual temperature of the land’s surface pictured here, which can be significantly hotter or colder than air temperatures.

The light blue in the image represents either snow and ice or cloud coverage. Snow and ice can be seen, for example, in the mountain ranges of Canada and Mount Rainier in the US, while some clouds can be seen on the Pacific Coast and in the bottom right of the map.

The persistent heat over parts of western Canada and parts of the US has been caused by a heat dome stretching from California to the Arctic. Temperatures have been easing in coastal areas, but there has been little respite for the inland regions.
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 07/02/2021 08:26 am
Earth from Space: North Frisian Islands
02/07/2021

Part of the Frisian Islands, a low-lying archipelago just off the coast of northern Europe, is visible in this image captured by the Copernicus Sentinel-2 mission.

The Frisian Islands stretch from the northwest of the Netherlands through Germany to the west of Denmark. Although they are considered a single physical feature, they are divided into West, East and North Frisian Islands – with the North Frisian Islands visible here.

The North Frisian Islands are split between Germany and Denmark. There are four larger islands that make up the archipelago: Sylt, Föhr, Amrum, and Pellworm.

Sylt, the largest of the archipelago, is around 100 sq km and is known for its distinctive shape of its shoreline. Sylt extends in length more than 35 km and, in some places, is only 1 km wide. A sandy beach stretches across the islands’ west coast, however it has begun to erode owing to storm tides. The northernmost island of Germany, it is connected to the mainland by the Hindenburgdamm, an 11 km-long causeway.

The Wadden Sea on the islands’ east side, between Sylt and the mainland, is part of the Schleswig-Holstein Wadden Sea National Park and has been a nature reserve and bird sanctuary since 1935.

The islands of Föhr and Amrum are visible southeast of Sylt. The larger Föhr is called the ‘Green Island’ due to it being sheltered from the storms of the North Sea by its neighbouring islands. The island of Amrum features an extended beach area along its west coast, which faces the open North Sea. The east coast borders to mud flats and tidal creeks of the Wadden Sea.

The three white islands visible below Amrum are the North Frisian Barrier Islands. These sand banks, or shoals, act as a natural breakwater for the smaller islands closer to land. Just east of these lies the island of Pellworm.

North of Sylt lies the Danish islands of Rømø, Mandø, and, lastly, Fanø. In the top-left of the image, a large algal bloom is visible in emerald green. Harmful algal blooms caused by excessive growth of marine algae have occurred in the North Sea in recent years, with satellite data being used to track their growth and spread. These data can then be used to help develop alert systems to mitigate against damaging impacts for tourism and fishing industries.
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 07/09/2021 12:01 pm
Gulf of Martaban, Myanmar
09/07/2021

The Gulf of Martaban, an arm of the Andaman Sea located in southern Myanmar, is featured in this false-colour image captured by the Copernicus Sentinel-2 mission. The image has been processed in a way that included the near-infrared channel – which makes vegetation appear bright red.

The gulf, also known as Gulf of Mottama, is named after the port city of Mottama, formerly known as Martaban. The Gulf of Martaban is considered a unique estuarine mudflat environment that is home to a great variety of flora and fauna. Fed by sediment and nutrients from three major rivers (Sittang, Salween and Yangon), the gulf supports a number of species including marine fish, 150 000 migratory birds as well as supporting the livelihood of tens of thousands of people.

A notable characteristic of the gulf is that it has a tide-dominated coastline, with tidal ranges between six and seven metres. The mouth of the gulf, which is approximately 100 km wide, narrows into a funnel-shaped bay to produce a powerful tidal bore phenomenon that can reach heights of over a metre in the upper estuary. As a result, the tidal mudflats of the gulf are among the largest in the world.

The Sittang River, visible in the right side of the image, originates near Mandalay, Myanmar, and flows southward for around 420 km before emptying into the gulf. Dense vegetation can be seen in bright red, particularly in the left of the image.

The distinct rectangular shape, visible in the upper half of the image, is part of the Moeyungyi Wetland Wildlife Sanctuary, a designated Ramsar Site of International Importance. The site encompasses several artificial lakes and bodies (visible in black). One of the bodies of water appears in light blue most likely owing to eutrophication – the overabundance of algae, phosphorus and other plant nutrients.

The city of Yangon is visible in the bottom-left of the image, at the convergence of the Yangon and Bago Rivers. With over seven million people, Yangon is Myanmar's most populous city and its most important commercial centre. The city served as the country’s capital until 2006.

Sentinel-2 is a two-satellite mission to supply the coverage and data delivery needed for Europe’s Copernicus programme. The mission’s frequent revisits over the same area and high spatial resolution allow changes in water bodies to be closely monitored.
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 07/16/2021 09:05 am
Lima, Peru
16/07/2021

Lima, the capital and largest city of Peru, is featured in this Copernicus Sentinel-2 image.

The commercial and industrial centre of Peru, Lima is located on the mostly flat terrain in the Peruvian coastal plain, within the valleys of the Chillón, Rímac and Lurín rivers. The city is bordered on the east by the foothills of the Andes Mountains and on the west by the Pacific Ocean.

Lima can be seen directly on the south bank of the Rímac River, which flows for around 200 km through the Lima Region, before emptying near Callao – a seaside city and port in the Lima metropolitan area (the largest metropolitan area of Peru).

Lima’s historical centre was declared a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1988 owing to its large number of historical buildings dating from the Spanish colonial era. One of the most notable characteristics of Lima is the barren desert that surrounds the city, with the sand supporting little to no plant life, with the exception of where water has been artificially provided.

Although Lima is located at a tropical latitude, the cool offshore Humboldt Current (also known as the Peru Current) produces a year-round temperate climate. The cooling of the coastal air mass produces thick cloud cover throughout winter and the dense sea mist, known locally as garúa, often rolls in to blanket the city. In this image, captured on 20 April 2020, several cloud formations can be seen dotted along the coast.

Callao is Peru’s main seaport and home to its main airport, Jorge Chávez International Airport. Several small boats and vessels can be seen near the port. Callao has several islands: San Lorenzo Island (currently used as a military base), El Frontón (a former high security prison), the Cavinzas Islands, and the Palomino Islands, where numerous sea lions and sea birds live.

The Copernicus Sentinel-2 mission consists of a pair of twin satellites that orbit Earth once every 100 minutes, together imaging a path on Earth’s surface 580 kilometres wide. The satellites observe in 13 spectral bands – from visible to infrared light – giving various perspectives on land and vegetation. This means that the mission can be used to retrieve a wealth of different information about Earth’s surface.
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: Hobbes-22 on 07/16/2021 09:21 am
Some of these Copernicus images were made into posters (available here: https://shop.spreadshirt.net/real-space-images/wall+prints?q=D22 (https://shop.spreadshirt.net/real-space-images/wall+prints?q=D22)), they look amazing as 60x40 cm prints.
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 07/23/2021 09:04 am
Tarso Toussidé, Chad
23/07/2021

The Tarso Toussidé volcanic massif is featured in this false-colour composite image captured by the Copernicus Sentinel-2 mission.

Tarso Toussidé, capped by the Toussidé (potentially active) stratovolcano, is located in the western end of the Tibesti Mountains, in Chad. With an elevation of 3265 m above sea level, Toussidé is the second highest peak in Tibesti, after Emi Koussi.

Toussidé has undergone a number of eruptions and lava flows, with the lava reaching lengths of 25 km and covering an area of 200 sq km, appearing to have ‘stained’ the ground in the process. The volcano ejected tephra, fragments of rock and volcano glass, lava and ash. In the middle of the field lies Pic Toussidé, a lava dome which can be seen poking out of the caldera.

Toussidé is said to be amongst the youngest volcanoes in Tibesti. A large number of fumaroles (openings in or near a volcano through which gases emerge) are active on its summit, exhaling mostly water vapour at temperatures of 40–60 °C – suggesting it is the only active Tibesti volcano.

Just next to Toussidé, in the far-right of the image, lies the Trou au Natron caldera, which sits at an elevation of around 2450 m. A number of volcanic cones sit on the floor of the caldera, with numerous vents and hot springs on the caldera’s floor emitting hot steam.

Much of the surface of the caldera is lined with a white crust of salts, including sodium carbonite. These crusts are usually formed when mineral-rich steam is emitted from small vents on the crater’s floor, and when this evaporates in the heat, the minerals are left behind.

The caldera has an irregular diameter of around 6-8 km and is up to 1000 m deep, and is said to have been filled by a freshwater lake during the last glacial maximum.

In the left of the image, the red shows sparse vegetation along the ephemeral creeks.

Satellite imagery is a practical way to study remote areas such as the volcanic regions in the Tibesti Mountain Range. The Copernicus Sentinel-2 mission carries a multispectral imager with 13 spectral bands and has a wide swath coverage, delivering data on Earth’s land every five days.
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 07/30/2021 09:19 am
Malé, the Maldives
30/07/2021

The Copernicus Sentinel-2 mission takes us over Malé – the capital and most populous city in the Republic of Maldives.

The Republic of Maldives consist of a chain of around 1200 small coral islands that are grouped into clusters of atolls – scattered across 90 000 sq km of ocean. A number of these little islands can be seen in the image, with the turquoise colours depicting clear, shallow waters dotted by coral reefs which contrasts with the dark colours of the Indian Ocean.

Malé, located at the southern edge of the North Malé Atoll, can be easily spotted in the right of the image. The island is small enough to walk around in approximately one hour, with most sights concentrated on its northern shore. Malé is both a trade and tourist centre, connected with Sri Lanka and India by steamship lines, with several vessels visible in the image.

With a population of more than 200 000 and an area of around eight sq km, Malé is one of the most densely populated cities in the world with the city covering almost the entire island.

With more than 80% of the Maldives’ land standing less than one metre above average sea level, the Maldives has the lowest terrain of any country in the world. This makes the archipelago particularly vulnerable to sea-level rise.

In response to this rising threat, the Maldives is working on enhancing the resilience of the country’s islands, which includes constructing the artificial island of Hulhumale – visible northeast of the airport island of Hulhulé.

The island has been constructed by pumping sand from the seafloor onto a submerged coral platform, that rises around 2 m above sea level. The reclaimed land provides some much-needed space, and will also help meet the industrial and commercial development of the Malé region.

Satellite data have shown that the global ocean has risen, on average, 3 mm a year over the last 25 years. Warming ocean waters, melting glaciers and diminishing ice sheets is making rising sea levels a real threat for low-lying islands such as the Maldives.

Following liftoff in November 2020, the Copernicus Sentinel-6 Michael Freilich satellite, the most advanced mission dedicated to measuring sea-level rise, is now fully operational – meaning that its data are available to climate researchers, ocean-weather forecasts and other data users.
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 08/03/2021 07:13 am
Smoke billows from fires in Turkey
02/08/2021

Captured by the Copernicus Sentinel-3 mission on 30 July 2021, this image shows smoke billowing from several fires along the southern coast of Turkey. Turkey has been battling deadly wildfires since last week. Over the weekend, tourists and local residents had to be evacuated from Bodrum and Marmaris, with some fleeing by boat as the flames crept closer to the shoreline. Southeast Europe is currently experiencing extremely high temperatures. Greece is reported to be expecting an all-time European record today of 47°C. The heatwave, the result of a heat dome, has seen temperatures reach above 40°C in many areas, and meteorologists expect the weather will continue this week, making it the most severe heatwave since the 1980s.

Fires have also been raging in Spain, Italy and Greece, some of which have led to the Copernicus Emergency Mapping Service being triggered. The mapping service uses data from satellites to aid response to disasters such as wildfires and floods.
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 08/13/2021 11:16 am
Wildfires ravage Greek island of Evia
12/08/2021

Parts of the Mediterranean and central Europe have experienced extreme temperatures this summer, with wildfires causing devastation in both Turkey and Greece. The blaze on Evia, Greece’s second-largest island, is one of the worst hit with fires having burned down large forested areas, homes and businesses – forcing thousands to evacuate by sea to save their lives.

This false-colour Copernicus Sentinel-2 image was captured yesterday on 11 August, and has been processed in a way that included the near-infrared channel which is usually used to highlight vegetation (visible in bright red). The image shows the extent of the burned area (visible in shades of brown and green) in the northern part of the island which has suffered the most damage, with an estimated 50 000 hectares lost.

The blaze, fuelled by strong winds, began on 3 August and is still ongoing, with hundreds of firefighters currently tackling the flames.

The heatwave has seen some countries record their highest temperature in decades, with the Italian island of Sicily registering 48.8°C, which may be Europe’s hottest temperature on record. Wildfires have also been raging in other parts of Greece, Italy, Albania and Algeria, prompting activations in the Copernicus Emergency Mapping Service. The mapping service uses data from satellites to aid response to disasters such as wildfires and floods.
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 09/10/2021 08:43 am
Danube Delta
10/09/2021


The Danube Delta is a labyrinth of water and land shared between Romania and Ukraine, made up of countless lakes, channels and islands lying at the end of the 2860 km-long river of the same name. The Danube River rises in the Black Forest mountains in Germany and along its course, passes through 10 countries: Germany, Austria, Slovakia, Hungary, Croatia, Serbia, Bulgaria, Romania, Moldova and Ukraine before emptying into the Black Sea.

The Danube Delta covers an area of some 4300 sq km and is known for its abundance of birdlife, as it hosts more than 300 species of birds as well as 45 species of freshwater fish in its numerous lakes and marshes. In 1991, the Romanian part of the Danube Delta became part of UNESCO’s list of World Heritage Sites.

In this true-colour image, captured in April 2020, the vast reed beds can be seen in shades of brown which is typical during this time of year. The Danube is visible (in the left of the image) before splitting into the various channels and branches that flow through the reeds and grassland before reaching the Black Sea. The distinct light-green colours in the sea are likely due to sediment being carried by the river.

Just south of the Danube Delta lie the lagoons of Razim (Razelm) and Sinoe, visible in emerald green owing to a high concentration of algae. This lagoon complex was formed with the help of the Danube’s alluvial deposits and the gradual eastward movement of the coastal currents caused by the advancement of the delta.

In the top-right of the image lies the Sasyk, or Kunduk, Lagoon in southern Ukraine. The site has been designated as Ramsar Wetland Site as it is important for migrating, breeding and moulting waterbirds.

Data gathered by the Sentinel-2 satellites are used for monitoring land use and changes, land management, agriculture, forestry and natural disasters (floods, forest fires, landslides and erosion). Offering colour vision for the Copernicus programme, Sentinel-2 delivers optical images from the visible to short-wave infrared range of the electromagnetic spectrum.
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 09/16/2021 11:22 am
California continues to burn
15/09/2021

While wildfires are a natural part of California’s landscape, a severe drought, coupled with extreme temperatures, have sustained several major fires for much of August. As of 14 September, more than 7000 wildfires have been recorded, burning over 900 000 hectares across the state.

The Dixie megablaze, the largest wildfire of the 2021 fire season and the second-largest blaze in recorded state history, has burned more than 388 000 hectares of mainly forested land and has destroyed more than 1200 buildings on its path. The fire, named after the road where is started, began on 13 July in the Feather River Canyon, and as of 14 September, is only 75% contained.

With thousands of firefighters continuing to battle the blaze, several were diverted to help harness the nearby Caldor Fire which has burned more than 88 700 hectares, threatening communities near Lake Tahoe before crossing the state’s border over to Nevada.

The map on the left shows wildfire hotspots along the US West Coast in 2021. Further north, a number of Canadian Provinces, including British Columbia, have also been experiencing intense fires since the end of June.

The Copernicus Sentinel-2 mission has been used to image the fires. The Sentinel-2 satellites each carry just one instrument – a high-resolution multispectral imager with 13 spectral bands. Captured on 1 September, the smoke and burn scars of the Caldor and Dixie Fires are visible in this image.

According to the Copernicus Atmosphere Monitoring Service (CAMS), smoke from the fires in North America has been transported across the continent and out over the Atlantic Ocean towards Europe yet is unlikely to affect Europeans as it is high up in the atmosphere. The smoke has, however, impacted air quality across the US and Canada, where it was much closer to the surface.

The Copernicus Sentinel-5P satellite is dedicated to monitoring air pollution by measuring a multitude of trace gases that affect the air we breathe. Images captured on 30 August show the presence of aerosols in the atmosphere caused by the fires. The plumes continued their journey eastwards, across the US even reaching Europe.

Claus Zehner, ESA’s Copernicus Sentinel-5P mission manager, says, “Copernicus satellites like Sentinel-2, Sentinel-3 and Sentinel-5P allow on one hand the point source detection of fires, and on the other hand, to monitor the movement of the emitted air pollutants over different states in the US and even to another continent like Europe.”

As the fires continue to burn, hot and dry conditions and forecasted thunderstorms have prompted officials to issue warnings through part of the state’s northwest coast.

Climate change is considered a key driver of this trend. In a recent report from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), scientists concluded that that there is an unequivocal link between human activity and global warming. The report pointed to observations showing increases in drought and fires in the western United States, expecting this trend to continue in the future.

https://www.esa.int/Applications/Observing_the_Earth/Copernicus/California_continues_to_burn
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: eeergo on 09/22/2021 08:42 am
Not an official "image of the week", but thought this might fit in here, given the recent developments in La Palma (one of the main Canary Islands in Spain, where the Roque de los Muchachos astronomy field on top of the extinct volcano is located, although that area is not foreseen to be affected):

https://twitter.com/CopernicusEMS/status/1440574519555465218
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: RoadWithoutEnd on 09/22/2021 09:21 am
I will never not be sad about how many images from space are not representative of the human eye.

Almost none of these are what a person would see out a window in space.

Until that view is mundane, we should stop pretending that anything else is a valid substitute.
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: eeergo on 09/22/2021 09:31 am
I will never not be sad about how many images from space are not representative of the human eye.

Almost none of these are what a person would see out a window in space.

Until that view is mundane, we should stop pretending that anything else is a valid substitute.

Actually, many published ones are quite faithful to visible light scenes. Check the many handheld camera pictures from ISS astronauts on Twitter (most of them are linked in the ISS Expedition threads) and you can see they don't differ much from some in this thread.

On the other hand, for the enhanced/false color ones: instead of suffering from missing the "true" human eye perspective, marvel at the fact that we're nowadays easily able to extend our very limited biological EM field perception into much broader (and sensitive) reaches and we're able to garner both information, understanding and even artistic sense, out of those representations.
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 09/24/2021 08:30 am
Calabria, Italy
24/09/2021

Calabria, often referred to as the ‘boot’ of Italy, is featured in this image captured by the Copernicus Sentinel-2 mission.

Calabria is a region in southern Italy, famous for its irregular shape that stretches from north to south for around 250 km – separating the Tyrrhenian Sea to the west and the Ionian Sea to the east. The region covers an area of around 15 000 sq km (with over 740 km of coastline) of which agricultural land covers 49%.

Most of the region is mountainous or hilly with three mountain ranges present: Pollino (not visible), La Sila and Aspromonte.

La Sila is a vast mountainous plateau around 1200 m above sea level, stretching for nearly 2000 sq km along the central area of Calabria. The highest point is Botte Donato, which reaches around 1928 m. The Aspromonte massif forms the southernmost tip of the Italian peninsula bordered by the sea on three sides. The highest peak is Montalto at 1955 m.

Calabria is separated from Sicily by the Strait of Messina, visible in the bottom-left, where the narrowest point between Capo Peloro in Sicily and Punta Pezzo in Calabria is only around 3.2 km.

Almost 2 million people reside in Calabria, with Reggio Calabria being the most populous city in the region (with an estimated population of around 200 000 people). The city lies on the ‘toe’ of the Italian Peninsula, on the slopes of the Aspromonte mountain range.

Calabria is known for its tourism, with its main attractions being the rugged cliffs and sandy beaches. Some of these main destinations include Tropea, Scilla, Lamezia Terme and Praia a Mare.

As well as providing detailed information about Earth’s vegetation, the Copernicus Sentinel-2 mission is designed to play a key role in mapping differences in land cover to understand the landscape, map how it is used and monitor changes over time.
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: eeergo on 10/06/2021 10:42 am
Some updates from Planet of the current volcanic eruption in the La Palma island, once its flow has reached the sea:

https://twitter.com/planet/status/1445510755277697035
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: abba888 on 10/06/2021 11:24 am
beautiful shot, and nice resolution
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 10/15/2021 08:19 am
New Delhi, the capital and second-largest city of India, is featured in this image captured by the Copernicus Sentinel-2 mission.

New Delhi is situated in the north-central part of the country and lies within the massive metropolitan area of Delhi, India’s capital territory. To the east, Delhi is bounded by the state of Uttar Pradesh, and to the north, west and south it is bounded by the state of Haryana.

Delhi’s urban area consists of the historical city of Old Delhi in the north, New Delhi in the south and now also includes the nearby cities of Ghaziabad, Faridabad, Gurugram and Noida. From space, these cityscapes together appear light grey in tone.

New Delhi sits, primarily, on the west bank of the Yamuna River, visible in black in the right of the image. One of the country’s most sacred rivers, the Yamuna is a tributary of the Ganges River, located around 160 km south of the Himalayas.

New Delhi, the government, commercial and financial centre of India, is considered one of the fastest growing cities in the country and in the world. The straight and diagonal pattern of the broad, tree-lined avenues in New Delhi, which features extensive green spaces, makes it appear as a darker-toned region and contrasts with the narrower, winding streets of Old Delhi.

The city is dotted with numerous museums, monuments, botanical gardens, places of worship and cultural buildings including the Hindu Akshardham Temple.

Other notable features in the image include Indira Gandhi International Airport visible in the left, and Hindon Airport to the right. Some perfectly squared plots of land can be seen in the image, particularly in the west side of the city.

As well as providing detailed information about Earth’s vegetation, Copernicus Sentinel-2 is designed to play a key role in mapping differences in land cover to understand the landscape, map how it is used and monitor changes over time. As cities continue to expand, Sentinel-2 can also be used to track urban expansion and assist urban planners.
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 12/03/2021 10:01 am
White Nile, Sudan
03/12/2021

A part of the White Nile state in Sudan is featured in this false-colour image captured by the Copernicus Sentinel-2 mission.

White Nile is one of the 18 states of Sudan. Covering an area of around 40 000 sq km, the state is divided into four districts: Ad Douiem, Al Gutaina, Kosti and Al Jabalian. The area pictured here is located just north of Kosti, also spelled Kūstī, which lies on the west bank of the White Nile River (not visible).

This false-colour image, captured on 25 August 2021, was processed in a way that also includes information from the near-infrared channel and shows vegetation in tones of red. This band combination is routinely used to monitor vegetation health. Although the area lies within an arid climatic region, low vegetation covering the valley floors between the sand dunes can be seen in bright shades of red.

Many agricultural plots can also be seen in red, particularly in the far-right and far-bottom of the image. Agriculture plays an important role in Sudan’s economy. The country’s main crops include cotton, peanuts, sesame and sugarcane, while the main subsistence crops include wheat, corn, sorghum and millet. Several small villages can also be spotted in the image, with many of them visible near artificial water reservoirs (easily spotted with their rectangular shape) and are most likely utilised during the dry season.

Owing to seasonal rainfall, many ephemeral bodies of water can be spotted in shades of turquoise and blue in the image.

Flooding is common in Sudan in August and September. During these months each year, monsoon rains pour into the Ethiopian Highlands and flow down to the Blue and White Nile and can often lead to floodwaters swamping nearby communities. Starting in August 2021, a series of torrential downpours overwhelmed streams and rivers and unleashed floods in the area, with the White Nile being one of the hardest hit areas.

Copernicus Sentinel-2  has two satellites, each carrying a high-resolution camera that images Earth’s surface in 13 spectral bands. The type of band combination from Copernicus Sentinel-2 used to process this image is commonly utilised to assess plant density and health, as plants reflect near-infrared and green light, while absorbing red. Since they reflect more near-infrared than green, dense, plant-covered land appears in bright red.
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 12/10/2021 12:09 pm
Fairbanks, Alaska
10/12/2021

The city of Fairbanks, the largest city in the Interior region of Alaska, and its surroundings, are featured in this Copernicus Sentinel-2 image.

Visible in the top-left corner of the image, Fairbanks is located in the central Tanana Valley, straddling the Chena River near its confluence with the Tanana River – a 940 km tributary of the Yukon River. Dominating this week’s image, the Tanana River’s name is an Athabascan word meaning ‘river trail’. Many low streams and rivers flow into the Tanana River.

The river flows in a northwest direction along the base of the Alaska Range (visible in the bottom of the image) before joining the Yukon River near the village of Tanana. The river drains the north slopes of the high Alaska Range and is fed by several glaciers. The sediment-laden Tanana is rich in minerals, which gives it its milky colour.

South of the Tanana River lies the Tanana Flats, an area of marsh and bog that stretches for more than 160 km until it rises into the Alaska Range. One of the components of the Alaskan mountains, the Alaska Range extends for around 650 km in a generally east-west arc from the Aleutian Range to the boundary of Yukon. The mountain range can sometimes be seen from Fairbanks on clear days. The highest mountain in North America, the Denali, lies in the Alaska Range and reaches an elevation of over 6000 m (not visible).

Around 20 km from Fairbanks lies the city of North Pole. Despite its name, the city is around 2700 km south of Earth’s geographic North Pole and around 200 km south of the Arctic Circle.

Light green colours in the image indicate deciduous forest, while dark green represents evergreen forests.

Sentinel-2 is a two-satellite mission to supply the coverage and data delivery needed for Europe’s Copernicus programme. The mission’s frequent revisits over the same area and high spatial resolution allow changes in both land and water bodies to be closely monitored.

Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 12/17/2021 08:38 am
Kourou, French Guiana
17/12/2021

Ahead of the upcoming Ariane 5 launch of the James Webb Space Telescope, the Copernicus Sentinel-2 mission takes us over Kourou – home to Europe’s Spaceport in French Guiana, an overseas department of France.

Located around 60 km northwest of the French Guianese capital Cayenne, Kourou is a coastal town in the north-central part of the country and is visible in the lower right of the image. The town lies at the estuary of the Kourou River which, after its journey of 144 km, empties into the Atlantic Ocean. Its muddy waters appear brown most likely due to sediments picked up from the surrounding forest.

Long, white sandy beaches line the town’s ocean coast, while the riverbank and inland area consists mostly of mangrove and dense tropical rainforest. The surrounding area’s economy is largely agricultural, with coffee, cacao and tropical fruits being grown.

Just northwest of Kourou lies Europe’s Spaceport – chosen as a base from which to launch satellites in 1964 by the French Government, and currently home to ESA-developed rocket families Ariane and Vega.

As Kourou lies just 500 km north of the equator, it makes it ideally placed for launches into orbit as the rockets gain extra performance thanks to a ‘slingshot effect’ from the speed of Earth’s rotation. In addition, there is no risk of cyclones or earthquakes. This launch base and the jungle that surrounds it covers 690 sq km and protects an abundance of wildlife and plants.

From here, the largest and most powerful telescope ever launched into space – the James Webb Space Telescope – is scheduled for launch. After liftoff, it will embark on a month-long journey to its destination, around one and a half million kilometres from Earth.

Following the footsteps of the Hubble Space Telescope, Webb is designed to answer questions about the Universe and to make breakthrough discoveries in all fields of astronomy. The telescope will be able to detect infrared light generated by galaxies as they formed more than 13.5 billion years ago, in the aftermath of the Big Bang. Webb will see farther into our origins – from the Universe's first galaxies, to the birth of stars and planets, to exoplanets.

In the first month after launch, Webb will unfold its sunshield, which is around the size of a tennis court, and deploy its 6.5-metre primary mirror. This will be used to detect the faint light of distant stars and galaxies with a sensitivity of a hundred times greater than that of Hubble.
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 01/28/2022 08:20 am
Lesotho
28/01/2022

The Copernicus Sentinel-2 mission takes us over northwest Lesotho – a small, land-locked country surrounded entirely by South Africa.

Known for its tall mountains and narrow valleys, Lesotho is the only nation in the world that lies completely above 1000 m in elevation. Lesotho has an area of just 30 000 sq km, around the same size as Belgium, and has a population of around two million.

Around 80% of the country’s population lives in rural areas and more than three quarters of these people are engaged in agriculture – mostly traditional, rainfed cereal production and extensive animal grazing. The country’s agricultural system faces a growing number of issues, including a small portion of the land deemed arable, as well as other climate-related vulnerabilities such as drought, floods and extreme temperatures occurring more frequently.

This composite image was created by combining three separate images from the near-infrared channel from the Copernicus Sentinel-2 mission over a period of nine months.

The first image, captured on 27 November 2020, is assigned to the red channel and represents the onset of the wet summer season; the second from 12 March 2021, represents green, and was captured towards the end of the wet season; and the third from 19 August 2021 covers the blue part of the spectrum, captured during the short, dry season.

All other colours visible in the image are different mixtures of red, green and blue, and vary according to the stage of vegetation growth. A distinct pattern emerges due to topographical differences in this mountainous landscape, such as altitude and slope, which influence local water availability.

Maseru, the capital and largest urban centre of Lesotho, lies directly on the Lesotho— South Africa border. The city is located on the left bank of the Caledon River, also known as the Mohokare River, visible in black.

The Copernicus Sentinel-2 mission is designed to provide images that can be used to distinguish between different crop types as well as data on numerous plant indices, such as leaf area, leaf chlorophyll and leaf water. The mission’s revisit time of just five days, along with the mission’s range of spectral bands, mean that changes in plant health and growth can be more easily monitored.
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 02/04/2022 09:24 am
Batura Glacier, Pakistan

04/02/2022

The Copernicus Sentinel-2 mission takes us over Batura Glacier – one of the largest and longest glaciers in the world, outside of the polar regions.

Located in the upper Hunza Valley, in the Gilgit-Baltistan region of Pakistan, the Batura Glacier is visible in the centre of the image and is approximately 57 km long. It flows from west to east and feeds the Hunza River in north Pakistan, then joins the Gilgit and Naltar Rivers before it flows into the Indus River.

The lower portions of the Batura Glacier feature a grey sea of rocks and gravelly moraine (an accumulation of rocks and sediment carried down by the glacier often caused by avalanches). The glacier has a mean ice thickness of around 150 m, with the lower parts of the glacier holding most of its mass.

This false-colour composite image uses the near-infrared channel of the Copernicus Sentinel-2 mission to highlight vegetation, which appears in red. Batura is bordered by several villages and pastures with herds of sheep, goats and cows where roses and juniper trees are quite common. In the upper-right of the image, pockets of cultivated vegetation alongside the Gilgit and Hunza rivers can be spotted.

Batura Glacier is located just north of the Batura Muztagh, a sub-range of the Karakoram mountain range, which includes the massifs of the Batura Sar, the 25th highest mountain on Earth standing at 7795 m, and Passu Sar at 7478 m.

Glacier shrinkage is a prominent sign of ongoing climate change. However, unlike many glaciers around the world, the glaciers residing in the mountain ranges in Karakoram are not responding to global warming. Their retreating is less than the global average, and in some cases, are either stable or growing. This anomalous behaviour of the region’s glaciers has been coined the ‘Karakoram Anomaly’.

Scientists typically measure the motions of glaciers with ground-based measurements. Because of the rugged terrain and challenges involved in field studies, long-term ground observational data on Karakoram is sparse. Satellites can help monitor changes in glacier mass, extents, trace area and length of glacier changes through time and derive surface velocity. Learn more about how Copernicus Sentinel-2 can help enhance glacier monitoring.
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 02/11/2022 12:04 pm
Hereford, Texas
11/02/2022

Hereford, and its surrounding colourful patchwork of agricultural fields, is featured in this Copernicus Sentinel-2 image.

Hereford, which is the county seat of Deaf Smith County in Texas, is widely known for its agriculture industry. Known as the beef capital of the world owing to its large number of cattle fed, Hereford can be spotted in the centre-bottom of the image. The area is known for its semiarid climate, with heavy farming and ranching sustained by irrigation from the Ogallala Aquifer – a massive underground reservoir spanning eight landlocked states.

A variety of crops are grown in the area including corn, wheat, maize, soybeans and onions. Circular shapes in the image are an example of centre-pivot irrigation systems, where equipment rotates around a central pivot and crops are watered with sprinklers. This type of irrigation helps farmers manage their watering demands as well as help conserve their precious water sources.

This composite image over the High Plains in Texas was created by combining three separate Normalised Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) images from the Copernicus Sentinel-2 mission spanning from 17 March to 21 April 2019.

Shades of red, yellow and green depict changes in vegetation growth at the beginning of the season. Black patches of land indicate very low vegetation for the season, while white signifies a high level of vegetation during these dates. The Normalised Difference Vegetation Index is widely used in remote sensing as it gives scientists an accurate measure of health and status of plant growth.

The US Route 60 can be seen cutting across the bottom-right of the image. The motorway is a major east-west US route, which runs over 4200 km from southwest Arizona to the Atlantic Ocean coast in Virginia.
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 02/25/2022 09:51 am
Washington, US
25/02/2022

To celebrate the recent data release from Landsat 9, this week we take a closer look at a part of Washington state – the northwesternmost state of the US – through the lens of Landsat 9.

Data from Landsat 9, which was launched in September 2021, is now publicly available for users and researchers across the world. The satellite will continue the programme’s critical role in monitoring, understanding and managing the land resources needed to sustain human life.

A partnership between NASA and the US Geological Survey, the satellite carries two science instruments, the Operational Land Imager 2 (OLI-2) and the Thermal Infrared Sensor 2 (TIRS-2). The OLI–2 captures observations of the Earth’s surface in visible, near-infrared, and shortwave-infrared bands, and TIRS-2 measures thermal infrared radiation, or heat, emitted from Earth’s surface.

This false-colour image, captured on 12 February 2022 by Landsat 9, has been processed using the satellite’s near-infrared channel. This channel is frequently used to highlight vegetation, which is particularly evident in the lower half of the image. Fields that are currently cultivated can be seen in bright red, while unvegetated areas appear in green and brown. Circular shapes, predominantly in the bottom-left, are centre-pivot irrigation fields – where equipment rotates around a central pivot and crops are watered with sprinklers. Washington is a leading agricultural state, with the top crops being apples, milk, potatoes and wheat.

Columbia River, the largest river in the Pacific Northwest, is visible in the top of the image in black. The river rises in the Rocky Mountains of British Columbia, Canada, flows through Washington and Oregon, before emptying into the Pacific Ocean. The river is one of the world’s greatest sources of hydroelectric power and, with its tributaries, represents a third of the potential hydropower of the United States.

As water absorbs a fair amount of radiation, water bodies, such as the Columbia River, appear black in the image. However certain icy water bodies dotted in the left of the image can be seen in turquoise as ice reflects less in the near-infrared channel than in the visible part of the spectrum.

The Landsat series is part of ESA’s Third-Party Missions programme which consists of almost 50 satellite missions, and also forms part of ESA’s Heritage Space programme.
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 03/04/2022 08:55 am
Snowy Pyrenees
04/03/2022

The Copernicus Sentinel-2 mission takes us over the Pyrenees Mountains in southwest Europe. The mountain range forms a natural border between France and Spain with the small, landlocked country of Andorra sandwiched in between.

Stretching from the shores of the Mediterranean Sea on the east to the Bay of Biscay (Atlantic Ocean) on the west, this international mountain range is 430 km long. The area pictured in this image, captured on 30 January 2022, spans around 120 km from the village of Escallare in the east to Panticosa to the west.

Located in the Spanish province of Huesca in the Posets-Maladeta Natural Park lies Pico de Aneto, the highest mountain peak in the Pyrenees. It rises to an elevation of 3404 m and is also the third-highest mountain in Spain. Click on the circle in the image to take a closer look at Pico de Aneto.

Geological studies have revealed that the Pyrenees Mountains have been around for longer than the Alps, with their sediments first deposited in coastal basins during the Paleozoic and Mesozoic eras. The entire mountain range formed due to the upwelling of large sedimentary rocks by the collision of the Iberian and the Eurasian plate around 100 to 150 million years ago, followed by intense erosion from ice and water.

Snow covers many of the peaks year-round, especially those in the centre-section of the chain. The western Pyrenees typically receive greater precipitation than the eastern Pyrenees owing to moisture blowing in from the Atlantic Ocean. The mountain range is also home to several small glaciers, as well as many mountain lakes and some of the highest waterfalls in Europe including Gavarnie Falls which, at 422 m, is France’s highest waterfall.

Few people live at the Pyrenees’ highest elevations; however, Andorra is nestled among peaks near the eastern end of the chain (not visible in the image). With an area of around 468 sq km, Andorra is the sixth smallest country in Europe.

The Copernicus Sentinel-2 mission is designed to play a key role in mapping differences in land cover to understand the landscape, map how it is used and monitor changes over time. As well as providing detailed information about Earth’s vegetation, it can also systematically map different classes of cover such as forest, grassland, water surfaces and artificial cover like roads and buildings.
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 04/01/2022 10:58 am
Barranquilla, Colombia
01/04/2022

Barranquilla, the capital of the Atlántico department in northwest Colombia, is featured in this image taken by the Copernicus Sentinel-2 mission.

Barranquilla, visible in grey at the top of the image, covers an area of around 155 sq km and is the fourth-most populous city in Colombia after Bogotá, Medellín and Cali. The city of Barranquilla serves as a major trade centre for Colombia, housing the largest port along the Caribbean Sea. Thanks to this famous port, Barranquilla earned itself the nickname ‘Colombia's Golden Gate’ (or La Puerta de Oro de Colombia in Spanish).

The city lies strategically next to the delta of the Magdalena River, one of the main rivers in Colombia, flowing northwards for around 1500 km through the west half of the country before emptying into the Caribbean Sea.

Owing to large quantities of sediment, as seen by the extensive sediment plume at its mouth and the brownish colour of its waters, the Magdalena requires frequent dredging of its main channel to allow access to Barranquilla’s port for oceangoing vessels. This image, captured in March 2021, was taken just before the onset of the rainy season, which starts in April.

The urban area of Barranquilla, with airport runways visible south of the city, contrasts with the Ciénaga Grande de Santa Marta swampy marshes to the east visible in dark green. Selected as a Ramsar Site of International Importance, the site is important for its mangrove ecosystem, which is the largest on the Caribbean coast of Colombia. It also serves as habitat and winter breeding ground for several bird species.

Other notable features in the image include the El Guajaro Reservoir, around 50 km southwest of Barranquilla. The reservoir was created by the union of seven smaller swamps in the area to supply water for agricultural irrigation. In addition to sewage discharges, the reservoir receives agricultural runoff, particularly during the rainy season, which leads to states of eutrophication in the water that are accompanied by blooms of harmful microorganisms, otherwise known as cyanobacteria.

These types of algae, which are commonly present in freshwater and saline ecosystems, are most likely why the lake appears in emerald green in today’s image. Satellite data from the Copernicus Sentinel-2 mission can track the growth and spread of harmful algae blooms in order to alert and mitigate against damaging impacts for tourism and fishing industries.
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 04/15/2022 11:04 am
Scandinavian Peninsula
15/04/2022

The Copernicus Sentinel-3 mission captured this impressive shot of the almost cloud-free Scandinavian Peninsula on 20 March 2022.

The Scandinavian Peninsula, which comprises Sweden and Norway, is approximately 1850 km long. It extends southward from the Barents Sea in the north, the Norwegian sea to the west and the Gulf of Bothnia and the Baltic Sea to the east. Denmark, Finland, Latvia and Lithuania are also visible in this week’s image.

Along the left side of the peninsula, the jagged fjords lining Norway’s coast can be spotted from space. Many of these fjords were carved out by the thick glaciers that formed during the last ice age. The largest and deepest fjord on Norway’s coast, called Sognefjord, lies in southwest Norway and is 1308 m deep.

Sweden’s topography consists mainly of flat, rolling lowlands dotted with lakes. Lake Vänern and Lake Vättern, the largest lakes of Sweden, are clearly visible at the bottom of the peninsula. The lakes do not freeze completely during the winter months. To the northeast of the peninsula lies Finland with more than 55 000 lakes – most of which were also created by glacial deposits.

During March, much of northern Europe and Scandinavia had been affected by a strong high-pressure weather system, which also allowed for this almost cloud-free acquisition. On 19 March in Tirstrup, Denmark, the atmospheric pressure reached 1051.6 hPa, the highest value ever recorded in March.

Carrying a suite of cutting-edge instruments, Copernicus Sentinel-3 measures Earth’s oceans, land, ice and atmosphere to monitor and understand large-scale global dynamics. It provides essential information in near-real time for ocean and weather forecasting.

With a focus towards our oceans, Sentinel-3 measures the temperature, colour and height of the sea surface as well as the thickness of sea ice, while, over land, the mission maps the way land is used, provides indices of vegetation state and measures the height of rivers and lakes.

A technical note: the image is a mosaic of 2 descending orbits with a difference of around 60 minutes between them, hence the observable striping at the top of the image.
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 04/22/2022 08:39 am
Earth
22/04/2022

This spectacular image of Earth was captured by the Meteosat Second Generation series of missions on 23 March 2022.

Satellites provide essential information for everyday applications, improving agricultural practices, to help when disasters strike, and thanks to the Meteosat series, provide crucial data for weather forecasting.

Given that extreme weather and severe storms pose significant and increasing hazards to society, the Meteosat satellites provide detailed, full disc imagery over Europe and Africa every 15 minutes and rapid scan imagery over Europe every five minutes.

This imagery is crucial for nowcasting, which is about detecting rapidly high impact weather and predicting its evolution a few hours ahead, in support of the safety of life and property. These observations are also used for weather forecasting and climate monitoring.

The Meteosat missions have guaranteed the continuous flow of data for weather forecasting since 1977, and later this year, we will soon begin a new era in weather and climate monitoring with Meteosat Third Generation (MTG).

The third generation will not only guarantee the continuity of data for weather forecasting, but offer significant enhancement of the current imager capabilities, an all-new infrared sounding capability and real-time lightning imaging for early detection of severe storms as they develop.

For the overall MTG mission two types of satellite are being developed; the Imaging satellite (MTG-I) and the Sounding Satellite (MTG-S). MTG-I1 is currently at Thales Alenia Space’s facilities in Cannes, France, undergoing an extensive testing campaign to ensure that the satellite will survive the rigours of the launch and the hostile environment of space.
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 04/27/2022 06:29 pm
https://twitter.com/CopernicusEU/status/1519210931250733056?t=KLmOkQ7xBVT1bOFaTKjO_g&s=19
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: Hog on 04/28/2022 04:23 pm
https://twitter.com/CopernicusEU/status/1519210931250733056?t=KLmOkQ7xBVT1bOFaTKjO_g&s=19
Happy "Holland Day" Jacqmans! We Canadians have always been treated very kindly in your country.
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 04/29/2022 01:00 pm
Mount Aso, Japan
29/04/2022

Mount Aso, the largest active volcano in Japan, is featured in this image captured on 1 January 2022 by the Copernicus Sentinel-2 mission.

Located in the Kumamoto Prefecture on the nation’s southernmost major island of Kyushu, Mount Aso rises to an elevation of 1592 m. The Aso Caldera is one of the largest calderas in the world, measuring around 120 km in circumference, 25 km from north to south and 18 km from east to west.

The caldera was formed during four major explosive eruptions from approximately 90 000 to 270 000 years ago. These produced voluminous pyroclastic flows and volcanic ash that covered much of Kyushu region and even extended to the nearby Yamaguchi Prefecture.

The caldera is surrounded by five peaks known collectively as Aso Gogaku: Nekodake, Takadake, Nakadake, Eboshidake, Kishimadake. Nakadake is the only active volcano at the centre of Mount Aso and is the main attraction in the region. The volcano goes through cycles of activity. At its calmest, the crater fills with a lime green lake which gently steams, but as activity increases, the lake boils off and disappears. The volcano has been erupting sporadically for decades, most recently in 2021, which has led to the number of visitors drop in recent years.

Not far from the crater lies Kusasenri: a vast grassland inside the mega crater of Eboshidake. Active just over 20 000 years ago, the crater has been filled with volcanic pumice from other eruptions, with magma still brewing a few kilometres below. Rainwater often accumulates on the plain forming temporary lakes. The pastures are used for cattle raising, dairy farming and horse riding.

One of the nearest populated cities is Aso, visible around 8 km north from the volcano, and has a population of around 26 000 people.

There are 110 active volcanoes in Japan, of which 47 are monitored closely as they have erupted recently or shown worrying signs including seismic activity, ground deformation or emissions of large amounts of smoke.

Satellite data can be used to detect the slight signs of change that may foretell an eruption. Once an eruption begins, optical and radar instruments can capture the various phenomena associated with it, including lava flows, mudslides, ground fissures and earthquakes. Atmospheric sensors on satellites can also identify the gases and aerosols released by the eruption, as well as quantify their wider environmental impact.
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 05/13/2022 10:04 am
Arc de Triomphe, Paris
13/05/2022

This striking, high-resolution image of the Arc de Triomphe, in Paris, was captured by Planet SkySat – a fleet of satellites that have just joined ESA’s Third Party Mission Programme in April 2022.

The Arc de Triomphe, or in full Arc de Triomphe de l’Étoile, is an iconic symbol of France and one of the world’s best-known commemorative monuments. The triumphal arch was commissioned by Napoleon I in 1806 to celebrate the military achievements of the French armies. Construction of the arch began the following year, on 15 August (Napoleon’s birthday).

The arch stands at the centre of the Place Charles de Gaulle, the meeting point of 12 grand avenues which form a star (or étoile), which is why it is also referred to as the Arch of Triumph of the Star. The arch is 50 m high and 45 m wide.

The names of all French victories and generals are inscribed on the arch’s inner and outer surfaces, while the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier from World War I lies beneath its vault. The tomb’s flame is rekindled every evening as a symbol of the enduring nature of the commemoration and respect shown to those who have fallen in the name of France.

The Arc de Triomphe’s location at the Place Charles de Gaulle places it at the heart of the capital and the western terminus of the Avenue des Champs-Élysées (visible in the bottom-right of the image). Often referred to as the ‘most beautiful avenue in the world’, the Champs-Élysées is known for its theatres, cafés and luxury shops, as the finish of the Tour de France cycling race, as well as for its annual Bastille Day military parade.

This image, captured on 9 April 2022, was provided by Planet SkySat – a fleet of 21 very high-resolution satellites capable of collecting images multiple times during the day. SkySat’s satellite imagery, with 50 cm spatial resolution, is high enough to focus on areas of great interest, identifying objects such as vehicles and shipping containers.

SkySat data, along with PlanetScope (both owned and operated by Planet Labs), serve numerous commercial and governmental applications. These data are now available through ESA’s Third Party Mission programme – enabling researchers, scientists and companies from around the world the ability to access Planet’s high-frequency, high-resolution satellite data for non-commercial use.

Within this programme, Planet joins more than 50 other missions to add near-daily PlanetScope imagery, 50 cm SkySat imagery, and RapidEye archive data to this global network.

Peggy Fischer, Mission Manager for ESA’s Third Party Missions, commented, “We are very pleased to welcome PlanetScope and SkySat to ESA’s Third Party Missions portfolio and to begin the distribution of the Planet data through the ESA Earthnet Programme.

“The high-resolution and high-frequency imagery from these satellite constellations will provide an invaluable resource for the European R&D and applications community, greatly benefiting research and business opportunities across a wide range of sectors.”
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 06/17/2022 12:18 pm
Glacier Bay, Alaska
17/06/2022

Part of the Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve, which lies along the coast of southeast Alaska, is featured in this image captured by the Copernicus Sentinel-2 mission.

Covering over 13 000 sq km of rugged, snow-capped mountains, freshwater lakes, glaciers and deep fjords, Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve is one of the highlights of Alaska’s Inside Passage. As marine waters make up almost one-fifth of the park, Glacier Bay is rich with marine life, including humpback whales, orcas and sea otters. It’s also home to a large population of bears, moose, wolves and mountain goats.

The bay contains some of the world’s most impressive glaciers that descend from the ice-covered St. Elias Range in the east and the Fairweather Range in the west, with a few notable tidewater glaciers extending all the way to the sea.

John Hopkins Glacier, visible in the far left of the image, is the largest tidewater glacier in the region. Muir Glacier, formerly the most famous of the tidewater glaciers, once rose around 80 m above water and was nearly 3 km wide but has now shrunk and receded and no longer reaches the sea.

Glacier Bay is just one of the many areas suffering from the effects of global warming. The bay is expected to become warmer and drier over the next century, with widespread effects including the further shrinking glaciers, reduced sea ice and shoreline erosion.

Monitoring glaciers is often a challenge considering their sheer size, remoteness and rugged terrain they occupy. Satellites, including ESA’s CryoSat mission, with its elite spaceborne sensor – the radar altimeter – allows for the mapping of glaciers in fine detail. In a study published last year in the Cryosphere, scientists utilised data from the CryoSat mission to show how much ice had been lost from mountain glaciers in the Gulf of Alaska.

Today marks the opening of the ‘Earth’s Memory - glaciers witnesses to the climate crisis’ exhibition, that follows the scientific and photographic journey of glaciers around the world, premiering the results of the ‘On the trail of the glaciers’ project directed by Italian photographer Fabiano Ventura. The exhibition, which is being held in the Forte di Bard Museum, Aosta Valley, Italy, offers its visitors the opportunity to witness the effects of global warming through the power of both photography and ESA satellite imagery.

The exhibition focuses on the world’s largest mountain glaciers with 90 photographic comparisons displayed alongside scientific data collected during the team’s expedition to the world’s largest mountain glaciers. It runs until 18 November 2022 and includes images such as the one featured on this week’s Earth from Space programme. More information on the exhibition, which is part of a scientific collaboration between ESA and is sponsored by UNESCO, can be found here.
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 06/24/2022 11:29 am
Lake Balkhash, Kazakhastan
24/06/2022

Lake Balkhash, the largest lake in Central Asia, is featured in this false-colour image captured by the Copernicus Sentinel-2 mission.

The lake, which is situated in east-central Kazakhastan, is around 605 km in length from east to west, with a maximum depth of around 25 m. The lake’s size varies depending on water balance, with its area fluctuating from around 15 000 sq km to 19 000 sq km.

Jutting out into the lake is the Sarymsek Peninsula which divides Balkhash into two separate hydraulic parts. The west part is wide and shallow with its water on this side particularly fresh and suitable for drinking. The east part, on the other hand, is narrow and relatively deep, with its waters on this side of the basin brackish and salty. The two parts of the lake are united by a narrow strait, the Uzynaral visible in the centre of the image, with a depth of around 6 m.

The sediment plume passing through the Uzynaral Strait is most likely due to waves stirring up sediments from the bottom of the lake. This has led to a higher reflection and thus a brighter water colour in this part of the lake.

The north banks of Lake Balkhash are high and rocky while the south banks are low and sandy, with wide belts covered with thickets of reeds and numerous small lakes. These low-lying banks are periodically flooded by the waters of the lake.

A high presence of sea ice can be seen in bright blue-greenish colours especially near the southern shoreline. This colour is due to ice having a higher reflectance in the visible parts of the spectrum than in the near-infrared. Balkhash usually remains frozen from the end of November to the beginning of April, with this image captured on 29 November 2021.

South of Balkhash lies the Saryesik-Atyrau Desert, which stretches for around 400 km in east Kazakhastan. There are a great number of small lakes, ponds and wetlands in the desert (visible in brown), as well as occasional grasslands, that support a varied animal and bird population.

Sentinel-2 is a two-satellite mission to supply the coverage and data delivery needed for Europe’s Copernicus programme. The mission’s frequent revisits over the same area and high spatial resolution allow changes in water bodies to be closely monitored.
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 07/01/2022 08:24 am
Patagonia
01/07/2022

The Copernicus Sentinel-3 mission captured this impressive, wide-angled view of Patagonia at the southern end of South America, as well as the Falkland Islands.

Covering an area of around 673 000 sq km, Patagonia is split by Argentina and Chile. The region comprises the southern section of the Andes Mountains, with lakes, fjords, rainforests and glaciers in the west and deserts and tablelands to the east.

The island archipelago of Tierra del Fuego, located at the southern tip of Patagonia (the southernmost tip of the image), is shared by Argentina and Chile, with the eastern part of the main island belonging to Argentina and the southern point of the archipelago, which forms Cape Horn, belonging to Chile. The Strait of Magellan, named after the discoverer, lies between Tierra del Fuego and mainland Argentina.

Part of the Alberto de Agostini National Park can be seen in the bottom of the image. The park features a highly irregular coastline, which is deeply indented by fjords. Deemed a designated UNESCO Biosphere Reserve, the park has several tidewater glaciers and comprises the Gordon, Cook and Londonderry islands.

The Falkland Islands can be seen in the far-right of the image. The islands lie in the South Atlantic Ocean, around 600 km east of Patagonia. The Falklands comprise two main islands, West Falkland and East Falkland, which are separated by the Falkland Sound – a channel that averages around 20 km in width.

The swirling green and blue coloured areas are densely concentrated phytoplankton blooms. These microscopic organisms thrive in the cool, nutrient-rich waters between the coast of southern Argentina and the Falkland Islands. Nutrients carried by rivers promote phytoplankton growth, which may explain the plankton hugging the South American coastline in the image, as well as dust carried from Patagonia offshore which is then diffused on the ocean surface by strong westerly winds.

In spring and summer, populations of algae in the South Atlantic often explode into enormous blooms – which float with the meandering ocean currents. Carrying a suite of cutting-edge instruments, Copernicus Sentinel-3 measures systematically Earth’s oceans, land, ice and atmosphere to monitor and understand large-scale global dynamics.

Sentinel-3 measures the temperature, colour and height of the sea surface as well as the thickness of sea ice, while over land maps land, provides indices of vegetation state and measures the height of rivers and lakes.
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 07/08/2022 09:42 am
Fuerteventura and Lanzarote
08/07/2022

Fuerteventura and Lanzarote, part of the Canary Islands lying in the North Atlantic Ocean, are featured in this false-colour image captured by the Copernicus Sentinel-2 mission.

The Canary Islands are a group of ocean island volcanoes that were formed by volcanic activity millions of years ago. The Spanish region and archipelago is located around 100 km off the north coast of Africa and 1000 km from the Iberian Peninsula. The eight main islands are (in order of largest to smallest in area) Tenerife, Fuerteventura, Gran Canaria, Lanzarote, La Palma, La Gomera, El Hierro and La Graciosa. The archipelago also includes many smaller islands and islets.

Lanzarote, the easternmost of the Canary Islands, is visible in the top-right of the image. With over 150 000 inhabitants, it is the third most populous Canary Island, after Tenerife and Gran Canaria. It covers an area of 845 sq km, making it the fourth-largest of the islands in the archipelago.

Lanzarote has a long history of eruptions and is often referred to as the ‘Island of the 1000 volcanoes’, yet it is actually the least mountainous Canarian Island. The highest mountain is the volcano Peñas del Chache near Haría in the northern part of the island, which is 670 m above sea level. The Timanfaya National Park can be seen in the southwest part of the island and is entirely made up of volcanic soil.

Fuerteventura Island, the second largest of the Canaries, lies southwest of Lanzarote, across the Bocaina Strait. Its total area is 1731 sq km and the island is around 110 km long and no more than 30 km wide. Fuerteventura is the oldest island in the Canary Archipelago, having risen between 12 and 20 million years ago owing largely to volcanic activity.

The island is fairly flat and has a desert landscape of sand and stones as well as long beaches. The centre of the island is made up of a wide, elongated valley and, from north to south, is dissected by a series of extinct, eroded volcanoes. The west coast is dotted with rugged cliffs and small bays.

To the northeast of Fuerteventura, separated by the 15 m deep strait El Río, lies the island of Isla de Lobos. The only six sq km island is home to a 127 m high extinct volcano.
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 08/17/2022 01:53 pm
Rhine river runs dry
17/08/2022

Water levels on the Rhine River, Europe’s second-largest river, have continued to drop owing to soaring temperatures and lack of rainfall, preventing many vessels from navigating through the waters at full capacity. The Copernicus Sentinel-2 mission captured part of the Rhine River near Cologne – showing the stark difference between August 2021 and August 2022.

Flowing from the Swiss Alps to the North Sea, the Rhine River is an important shipping route for many products from grains to chemicals to coal. When water levels drop, cargo vessels need to sail with reduced load, so they don’t run aground.

Water levels at the chokepoint of Kaub, near Frankfurt, fell to 32 cm in depth on Monday, down from 42 cm last week. Ships, however, need around 1.5 m to be able to sail fully loaded making it difficult for larger ships to navigate through the waters. Freight ships continue to sail, but only with around 25% to 35% of the ship’s capacity.

The low water levels are emerging earlier than usual, with the lowest water levels typically recorded in September or October. However, reduced temperatures and predicted rainfall forecasted for this week may offer relief to the Rhine.

The phenomenon facing the Rhine is common across much of Europe after an unusually hot and dry summer – causing wildfires and water shortages.

The Copernicus Sentinel-2 satellites capture high-resolution imagery that provide information about the conditions on Earth, such as plant life, soil and coastal areas. The mission consists of two satellites both of which carry an innovative multispectral imager – a camera that captures optical images over a range of wavelengths beyond visible light.
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 09/16/2022 11:36 am
UK heatwave
16/09/2022

This summer, heatwaves struck Europe, North Africa, the US and Asia with temperatures reaching over 40°C in places – breaking many long-standing records. Images from the Copernicus Sentinel-3 mission show the scale of Britain’s heatwave as it baked in extreme temperatures in August.

The image, captured on 12 August 2022, shows the United Kingdom’s previously green land appear brown (particularly in the southeast) amid the scorching conditions. The heatwave comes after months of extreme temperatures and low rainfall left the landscape parched. The dry conditions are also visible in parts of France, Belgium and the Netherlands.

The severe heatwaves experienced across Europe this summer are a harsh reminder of what is in store for our future.  Extreme weather events will happen more frequently and intensely according to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). This trend is set to worsen unless the rise in atmospheric greenhouse gas emissions caused by human activities is addressed.

Satellites orbiting our planet play an important role in delivering data to understand and monitor how our world is changing. Their observations and data are critical for improving model predictions of our future climate, mitigation strategies and policymaking.

The Copernicus Sentinel-3 mission not only provides two-day global coverage optical data, but it also carries a Sea and Land Surface Temperature Radiometer instrument that measures Earth’s land surface temperature (how hot the actual surface would feel to touch). During August 2022, the Sentinel-3 mission recorded extreme land surface temperatures of more than 45°C in the United Kingdom, 50°C in France and 60°C in Spain.

Sentinel-3 data has also been merged with archived satellite observations to form a recently released 25-year record of global land surface temperatures (from 1995 to 2020) developed by ESA’s Climate Change Initiative along with Europe’s leading climate scientists. This data record shows a stable increase in global land surface temperature of 0.2°C per decade, with strong regional variability.

Monitoring land-surface temperatures is useful for scientists because the warmth rising from Earth’s surface influences weather and climate patterns. These measurements are particularly important for farmers evaluating how much water their crops need and for urban planners looking to improve heat-mitigating strategies.
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 09/23/2022 09:22 am
Lake Trasimeno, Italy
23/09/2022

Lake Trasimeno, the fourth largest lake in Italy

Lake Trasimeno is located in central Italy, around 20 km west of Perugia, and has an area of around 128 sq km. It is shallow, with its maximum depth of approximately 6 m, although the lake’s water level varies depending on meteorological and climatic conditions.

In this Copernicus Sentinel-2 image, captured on 6 August 2022, the lake’s emerald green colour is likely due to the presence of phytoplankton. Streaks in the water, particularly visible in the west, indicate the presence of soil and sediments which have been stirred up by winds. Dark coloured waters in the southern part of the lake indicate a presence of submerged and floating macrophytes (aquatic plants) as well as algae.

Surrounded by hills on three sides, Trasimeno is subject to heavy storms created by winds, especially from the north and west. There are three islets in the lake: Maggiore, Minore and Polvese (the largest). The lake’s shores are sparsely inhabited with only two popular villages: Castiglione del Lago and Passignano sul Trasimeno.

Italy is experiencing its worst drought in 70 years which has affected drinking water supplies, hydroelectric power and agricultural production. High temperatures, hot winds and lack of rainfall are the main causes of drought in the Umbrian region which saw Lake Trasimeno’s drop 1.3 m, reaching the limit of the hydrometric zero in July 2022.

Lake Trasimeno wasn’t the only Italian water body affected by drought this summer, with the Po River hitting record-lows. The Copernicus Sentinel-2 satellites capture high-resolution imagery that provides information about the conditions on Earth, such as water quality, plant life and coastal areas.

The mountainous terrain of the Umbrian Apennine Mountains surrounds Lake Trasimeno with many agricultural fields dotted around the area. Several other smaller lakes including Lake Montepulciano, Lake Chiusi and Lake Pietrafitta, can be seen south of Lake Trasimeno. Perugia, capital of the Umbria region, is a well-known cultural and artistic centre in Italy known for its chocolate and jazz festivals.
Title: Re: Earth from space: image of the week
Post by: jacqmans on 09/30/2022 08:42 am
Melt ponds in West Greenland
30/09/2022

During spring and summer, as the air warms up and the sun beats down on the Greenland Ice Sheet, melt ponds pop up. Melt ponds are vast pools of open water that form on both sea ice and ice sheets and are visible as turquoise-blue pools of water in this Copernicus Sentinel-2 image.

When snow and ice melts atop glaciers, water flows in channels and streams and collects in depressions on the surface. These melt ponds can speed up the melting of the surrounding ice since they greatly reduce the ice’s ability to reflect sunlight. This can create a positive feedback where an increasing number of melt ponds absorb more heat which causes ice cover to melt even faster. In this image, captured on 29 August 2022, melt ponds in the province of Avannaata can be easily spotted from space as they are usually much darker than the surrounding ice. In some ponds, chunks of ice float atop the pond’s waters.

The bay visible here is Sugar Loaf Bay (an indentation of the northeast Baffin Bay) in the Upernavik Archipelago. The archipelago extends from the northwest coast of Sigguup Nunaa peninsula to the southern end of Melville Bay.

The Greenland Ice Sheet is the largest ice mass in the northern hemisphere. It extends 2220 km north-south with an average thickness of around 1500 m and spans 1100 km at its widest point.

As most of the northern hemisphere baked under a prolonged heatwave this summer, Greenland has been hit with an unusual late-season heatwave and melt event in early September – the kind of melt that usually occurs in the middle of summer.

The first day of September typically marks the end of the Greenland melt season, as the sun moves lower in the sky with temperatures usually cooling. However, at the beginning of September 2022, temperatures began to rise again when a strong air pressure region parked at the southeast edge of Greenland and drew warmer air northwards across Baffin Bay and the west coast of Greenland.

This led to meltwater runoff, the amount of surface water entering the ocean, to increase with its extensive melting contributing to global sea level rise – which impacts the millions of people living in coastal communities.

In a recent paper published in Nature Climate Change, scientists found that major sea-level rise from the melting of the Greenland ice cap is now ‘inevitable’ even if the burning of fossil fuels were to halt overnight. Using satellite observations of Greenland ice loss and ice cap from 2000 to 2019, the team found the losses will lead to a minimum rise of 27 cm regardless of climate change.

Earth observation satellites are key to monitoring ice as they carry instruments that measure changes in the thickness of the ice sheets, fluctuations in the speed of the outlet glaciers and even small changes in Earth’s gravity field caused by melting ice as well as sea-level rise.