Author Topic: Space Shuttle Launch Pad 39A with Challenger STS-6 (1:144)  (Read 902180 times)

Offline roma847

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2280
  • Be part of it
  • Germany
  • Liked: 2069
  • Likes Given: 54
Re: Space Shuttle Launch Pad 39A with Challenger STS-6 (1:144)
« Reply #2340 on: 02/09/2023 10:22 pm »
Hello everybody,

as advertised, here is the brief overview of gluing the vertical struts to the three remained frames with 1 mm overhang at the top of the frames as I had described for the first frame.









The gluing of the Screw Jacks I'll do tomorrow in daylight.

« Last Edit: 02/09/2023 10:24 pm by roma847 »
***************
Regards from Germany

Manfred

Under construction:
1:144 Launch Pad 39A with Challenger STS-6

Offline roma847

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2280
  • Be part of it
  • Germany
  • Liked: 2069
  • Likes Given: 54
Re: Space Shuttle Launch Pad 39A with Challenger STS-6 (1:144)
« Reply #2341 on: 02/10/2023 11:05 pm »
Hello everybody,

and thus to the trickiest part of the exercise, gluing the Screw Jacks onto the fragile frames, where everything can still go wrong, but must not go wrong!

That's why I thought back and forth beforehand as to how the frames could be fixed best and as gently as possible in order to be able to glue the Screw Jacks as centrally and precisely as possible to the front edge.

Finally, I've fixed the frame with narrow tape strips on a steel ruler, the lower struts with 2 mm tape, and the upper short ends with 1 mm tape, which resulted in a sufficiently tight fit.

To try it on, I've clamped the ruler in a small vice and carefully laid down a spindle on it, which was quite a balancing act, but has held up.



In order to be able to handle better when gluing the parts, I first held the ruler in my hand and dabbed the front ends of the struts lightly with Revell adhesive and put the ruler down for a moment. Then I grabbed the protective tube with the flat tweezers, picked up the ruler with the other hand and carefully placed the spindle with the tiny Angle holders on the adhesive points of the struts, which worked well, so that I could breathe a sigh of relief.

Then I inspected the vertical seat of the spindle from all sides and corrected it slightly,



and let all dry for a while.



After I carefully removed the tape strips, I was glad that everything worked out and that my plan had worked again perfectly.



Gluing the remaining three Screw Jacks will become a bit easier already, I hope so.

« Last Edit: 02/10/2023 11:06 pm by roma847 »
***************
Regards from Germany

Manfred

Under construction:
1:144 Launch Pad 39A with Challenger STS-6

Offline roma847

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2280
  • Be part of it
  • Germany
  • Liked: 2069
  • Likes Given: 54
Re: Space Shuttle Launch Pad 39A with Challenger STS-6 (1:144)
« Reply #2342 on: 02/13/2023 10:00 pm »
Hello everybody,

and with that go right to the next Screw Jack, which was indeed easier to do, since the method of gluing has now proven itself.



After the tape strips were carefully removed, the seat of the spindle was slightly adjusted,



and finally found as perfect,



which already half of the Screw Jacks was done.



And so it was worth going for a test on the Port Side of the Payload Canister.





This was followed immediately by the third Screw Jack,



and finally still the fourth one too.



And I think they look pretty much alike, right?



And together with the two Door Actuator Pneumatic Drives, another small but very laborious and tricky milestone has been reached,





what more than only satisfies me.

« Last Edit: 02/13/2023 10:10 pm by roma847 »
***************
Regards from Germany

Manfred

Under construction:
1:144 Launch Pad 39A with Challenger STS-6

Offline goretexguy

  • Member
  • Posts: 86
  • Liked: 105
  • Likes Given: 24
Re: Space Shuttle Launch Pad 39A with Challenger STS-6 (1:144)
« Reply #2343 on: 02/15/2023 03:43 pm »
I'd love to see some pictures of the current state of everything you've put together so far. This has been an amazing project to follow.

Offline roma847

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2280
  • Be part of it
  • Germany
  • Liked: 2069
  • Likes Given: 54
Re: Space Shuttle Launch Pad 39A with Challenger STS-6 (1:144)
« Reply #2344 on: 02/15/2023 04:15 pm »
Thanks for your compliment, my friend.

I can understand you, but that is and remains a pious wish, which unfortunately I cannot fulfill.

This would require me to stop my current work on the Payload Canister and go through my entire report and clear out my closets, which I don't have time for, which you'll understand, especially since the project has become far too complex by now.
Then you have already to scroll through all the 118 pages yourself to get an overview.

« Last Edit: 02/15/2023 04:19 pm by roma847 »
***************
Regards from Germany

Manfred

Under construction:
1:144 Launch Pad 39A with Challenger STS-6

Offline roma847

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2280
  • Be part of it
  • Germany
  • Liked: 2069
  • Likes Given: 54
Re: Space Shuttle Launch Pad 39A with Challenger STS-6 (1:144)
« Reply #2345 on: 02/16/2023 05:55 pm »
Hello everybody,

but in addition to the Screw Jacks and Door Actuator Drives there are a few more details on the side walls that should not be missing.

And those are the Ladders right next to the Access Platforms and these Outriggers (folded) at the front end of the canister.


Source: NASA (STS-135)

The outriggers can be folded or folded out as needed for the transfer of the canister to the Payload Changeout Room (PCR) of the RSS. In the extended position, the rotatably mounted PCR Guide Shoes slide in vertical guides on both sides of the RSS Payload Bay when the canister is hoisted and thus to keep the shuttle's payload as stable as possible.


Source: NASA (STS-129)

Here the guide shoes dip into the guide rails.


Source: NASA (STS-129)

On this image I determined the dimensions of the ladders.


Source: NASA (STS-132)

For these ladders, I got already these PE Ladders from ABER (1:200-05) a long time ago,



which are offered there as Ships Ladders (wide) in three different widths, of which the middle width (3,5 mm) is well suited for my scale (1:160).

The Plastruct Styrene Ladders would have the required width, but they are 'rough wrought-iron work' that one can safely forget.

After cutting out from the PE circuit board, the narrow side bars still have to be bent by 90,





for which a special Hold and Fold tool is needed.





And this ladder size fits well into the mould,



which I can also use for the ladders on the Forward Bulkhead of the canister.


Source: forum.nasaspaceflight.com (STS-9, Ares67)

And as one can see, there are still also some Railings there that can be folded or folded out as well.

« Last Edit: 02/16/2023 05:58 pm by roma847 »
***************
Regards from Germany

Manfred

Under construction:
1:144 Launch Pad 39A with Challenger STS-6

Offline roma847

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2280
  • Be part of it
  • Germany
  • Liked: 2069
  • Likes Given: 54
Re: Space Shuttle Launch Pad 39A with Challenger STS-6 (1:144)
« Reply #2346 on: 02/20/2023 08:12 am »
Hello everybody,

but I want to start with the Outriggers, which, similar to the Door Actuators on the canister doors, consist of foldable linkages, at the end of them the PCR Guide Shoes are mounted, which can be seen in the folded state in these two images.

Then I've also marked the two Lifting Trunnions for hoisting the canister, which are also still to do.


Source: NASA (STS-135)

For hoisting the canister into the RSS Payload bay , the outrigger is folded out by locking the lower Support strut into the upper bracket marked here,


Source: NASA (STS-135)

which can also be seen in these drawings.


Source: Library of Congress, HAER FL-8-11-I


Source: Library of Congress, HAER FL-8-11-I

But before assembling the linkages, I've looked for NASA photos, on which one can see the structure of the outrigger better, and actually have made a find at STS-135, which is extensively photo-documented as the last Shuttle mission.


Source: NASA (STS-135)

On it one can see the structure of the triangular support frame, which is rotatably mounted at the base in brackets on the side wall and connected to the guide shoe at the other end. The swiveling support strut is rotatably mounted on the shoe's holder, which can be locked in the folded state or, as shown here, in the unfolded state, as required.


Source: NASA (STS-135)

And to this size the outrigger must now be shrunk.



For the PCR Guide Shoe I used an Evergreen Strip (0,5 mm x 1,5 mm), which was sanded down to a width 1,3 mm.



For the struts I will use an Evergreen rod ( 0,4 mm), I have provisionally laid out them here.


 
So much for today.

***************
Regards from Germany

Manfred

Under construction:
1:144 Launch Pad 39A with Challenger STS-6

Offline roma847

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2280
  • Be part of it
  • Germany
  • Liked: 2069
  • Likes Given: 54
Re: Space Shuttle Launch Pad 39A with Challenger STS-6 (1:144)
« Reply #2347 on: 02/24/2023 06:30 pm »
Hello everybody,

after the provisional fitting of the Outrigger, the parts were now glued together, first the two diagonal struts with the holding plate, which later is glued with the Guide shoe.



To do this, the two diagonal struts were fixed with tape, after what the upper cross strut and to it the lateral hinge plates could be glued,



which are articulated in the holders on the side wall for folding and unfolding the outrigger.

And here at the latest, compared to the drawing, I noticed that the Guide shoes (8 mm) were a bit too long, which was confirmed by subsequent measurements using photos, what had also to be corrected, similar like the holding plate, which was also a bit too big.



The strips for the holdings (0,13 mm x 0,5 mm x 1 mm) have a small overhang so that they can still be held with tweezers when gluing them to both sides of the hinge strips.



Here first the gluing of the inner parts of the holders, the overhang parts of which were carefully separated with a razor blade.



And here the gluing of the outer strips,



whose overhangs were also separated.



Then the strut linkage was glued to the shortened guide shoe.



The length of the slanting support strut was determined using this small template to 7,5 mm.



As one can see on this image, all mountings sit on small base plates (0,13 mm x 1 mm x 1,5 mm), which should not be missing either,


Source: NASA (STS-135)

but had to be fixed again for gluing.





The slanting support strut is also locked in both positions in a holder that I glued together with the base plate at the foot of the strut.





And then I've tried the outrigger on the canister only without the support strut,



which looks pretty well.

All of these fragile structures are only glued onto the canister at the end so that they cannot be damaged beforehand.

***************
Regards from Germany

Manfred

Under construction:
1:144 Launch Pad 39A with Challenger STS-6

Offline roma847

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2280
  • Be part of it
  • Germany
  • Liked: 2069
  • Likes Given: 54
Re: Space Shuttle Launch Pad 39A with Challenger STS-6 (1:144)
« Reply #2348 on: 02/26/2023 04:48 pm »
Hello everybody,

today I took on the Lifting Trunnions for lifting and transporting the canister, which are located at different heights on both sides at its bulkheads.


Source: NASA (STS-135)

As one can see in this image, the Lifting trunnions consist of three parts, a cylindrical base on which the trunnion with a slightly smaller diameter sits, and an outer cover plate,


Source: NASA (STS-125)

which is probably screwed to the trunnion to secure it after the crane's Lifting plate has been attached.


Source: NASA (STS-135)

And these are the prepared parts, the white base ( 1,2 mm x 0,5 mm), the gray trunnion ( 1 mm x 0,5 mm) and the black cover plate ( 1,2 mm x 0,25 mm) that I made with my Punch & Die Set.



The tiny parts were glued with UHU CA in the tried and tested locking mechanism between the rulers.









This was followed by the gluing of the lifting trunnions, first on the Port Side of the canister,





and then on the Starboard Side.









In the meantime, the vertical support strut has also been glued at the Outrigger,



and here the complete outrigger has been positioned on the Port side for a test, which looks quite neat.





Now all that's missing is the outrigger for the Starboard Side, which will now follow.

***************
Regards from Germany

Manfred

Under construction:
1:144 Launch Pad 39A with Challenger STS-6

Offline mike robel

  • Extreme Veteran
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2277
  • Merritt Island, FL
  • Liked: 349
  • Likes Given: 203
Re: Space Shuttle Launch Pad 39A with Challenger STS-6 (1:144)
« Reply #2349 on: 03/01/2023 01:08 am »
Magnificent.  Your thread is what keeps me coming back to the site.  it even almost gets me motivated to build/rebuild some of my kits/damaged models, but not yet...sigh.
« Last Edit: 03/01/2023 01:09 am by mike robel »

Offline roma847

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2280
  • Be part of it
  • Germany
  • Liked: 2069
  • Likes Given: 54
Re: Space Shuttle Launch Pad 39A with Challenger STS-6 (1:144)
« Reply #2350 on: 03/01/2023 07:12 am »
Thanks Mike for your nice compliment, which makes me very happy, especially waking you up from your hibernation.

I'm excited to see what you'll choose, let's go!

***************
Regards from Germany

Manfred

Under construction:
1:144 Launch Pad 39A with Challenger STS-6

Offline roma847

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2280
  • Be part of it
  • Germany
  • Liked: 2069
  • Likes Given: 54
Re: Space Shuttle Launch Pad 39A with Challenger STS-6 (1:144)
« Reply #2351 on: 03/02/2023 05:43 pm »
Hello everybody,

for the sake of completeness, here is the lower Support strut bracket of the Outrigger required when folded,



and here its later position on the Port Side of the canister.



Although my size comparison using the Eurocent is always very impressive, the comparison of the outrigger with a Can Crew worker shows the actual relation in the model scale 1:160, which is otherwise difficult to imagine. 



Even more impressive are original photos like this one, on which workers dismantle the Guide Shoe on an Outrigger. On it one can even see the handle for locking the support strut in the various positions, which I do without because with 0,1 mm x 0,5 mm x 1 mm it would really be too tiny.


Source: NASA (Jim Grossmann)

But then I still have to correct my assumption from the last post about the screwing of the Cover disk on the Lifting trunnion.

I came across this because I remembered a picture my friend James MacLaren took of the Payload Canister just before it was attached to the lifting block of the 90-ton Payload Hoist with its Spreader beam, contained in his documentation Space Shuttle Launch Complex 39-B Construction Photos - Page 9 wherefore I've asked him regarding the red-lettered parts.

In addition to the parts that are already known, you can see the Spreader beam with the lifting plates and on the left in the image one of the two Guide Rails for guiding the Guide Shoes when lifting the canister up to the Payload Changeout Room (PCR).


Source: James MacLaren

And if anyone is familiar with these things, then it's him who worked 5 years during building the Launch Pad 39-B and knows the RSS inside out. He also has a large pool of detailed NASA drawings, which he is linking to in his documentation and explains down to the last detail.

Thereupon he has sent me this drawing, on which he highlighted the Lifting Plate, which has a slotted hole with two different-sized openings, which is a simple but ingenious solution for accommodating the Lifting trunnion.


Source: James MacLaren

This holds the spreader-beam in such a position to allow the lifting plates hanging from the lifting cables to be passed through the larger opening over the lifting trunnions and the beam then can carefully be lifted, fixing the trunnions in the smaller opening of the plates.

This special lifting plate I had also noticed in a photo sent by my friend Richard Chamberlain, who was a member of a Can Crew, cause I still haven't tinkered with these details more closely that time.



The Canister hoisting system and its entire handling is so complex and demanding, but at the same time very interesting, so I can commend all interested guys highly the Page 52: A Lighter Moment in a Heavy Place, and a Deep Dive into the Canister Hoisting System in James MacLaren's documentation The Construction of Space Shuttle Launch Complex 39-B.

With that you always have to keep in mind that the canister is approx. 20 m long and with its weight of approx. 64 t represents an enormous free hanging load, and hoisting it to the PCR is a high sensitive matter that is not harmless and must therefore be secured by various vertical and horizontal Tag Lines.

« Last Edit: 03/02/2023 05:50 pm by roma847 »
***************
Regards from Germany

Manfred

Under construction:
1:144 Launch Pad 39A with Challenger STS-6

Offline roma847

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2280
  • Be part of it
  • Germany
  • Liked: 2069
  • Likes Given: 54
Re: Space Shuttle Launch Pad 39A with Challenger STS-6 (1:144)
« Reply #2352 on: 03/06/2023 10:58 pm »
Hello together,

the second Outrigger is waiting for me, let's go.

The twin should at least look similar to its brother.





Only the Vertical Support Strut has to point to the other side, which I took into account in good time.



The way they both are standing there now, I think I've done quite well with them.



And here is the test fitting on the Starboard Side.





Next I'll probably turn to these Railings on the Forward Bulkhead of the canister,


Source: forum.nasaspaceflight.com (STS-9, Ares67)

which can also be folded in or out.

***************
Regards from Germany

Manfred

Under construction:
1:144 Launch Pad 39A with Challenger STS-6

Offline roma847

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2280
  • Be part of it
  • Germany
  • Liked: 2069
  • Likes Given: 54
Re: Space Shuttle Launch Pad 39A with Challenger STS-6 (1:144)
« Reply #2353 on: 03/08/2023 12:32 pm »
Hello everybody,

first of all, I determined the dimensions of the eight railings (1:160) from the photo, which again was tiresome measuring and converting measures.

In this the opposite Railings G-1 to G-4 have identical dimensions, which makes the work a little easier.


Source: forum.nasaspaceflight.com (STS-9, Ares67)

Using this I've copied appropriately scaled rectangles into this NASA drawing (1:160),



which I've printed out and can use as a template for scratching the railings.



Now I'm going to look for the appropriate round rods ( 0,45 mm), and then I can start with the stressful cutting of the railing rods.

***************
Regards from Germany

Manfred

Under construction:
1:144 Launch Pad 39A with Challenger STS-6

Offline roma847

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2280
  • Be part of it
  • Germany
  • Liked: 2069
  • Likes Given: 54
Re: Space Shuttle Launch Pad 39A with Challenger STS-6 (1:144)
« Reply #2354 on: 03/09/2023 06:33 pm »
Hello everybody,

first of all, here is a photo from the early years of the Shuttle Program (1980), on which the erected Railings can be seen, so that nothing could happen to the Can Crew guys when installing the Payload into the Payload Changeout Room (PCR).


Source: Library of Congress, HAER FL-8-11-I

And with this to the two lower Railings G-1, whose six individual parts I've cut out of round rods ( 0,45 mm). First of all, I thought about how best to assemble the railing and in which order I should glue the individual struts together.

Doing it I then came to the division in the true-to-scale sketch with the corresponding lengths of the rods and decided on the variant with three Vertical struts (2, 3, 4) decided, which ensures a better stability than the variant with two Cross struts (1)

Since the vertical struts have the same length (5,5 mm) on all railings, I have cut 18 sticks for all eight railings using the Cutter chisel at the ruler stop.



This was followed by the gradual gluing of the struts building the railing, for which I again used my tried and tested Clamping technique with the steel angle and the rulers. Due to the minimal contact surfaces between the struts, the adhesive application must be dosed carefully in order to avoid unsightly bonding with the base. 



In order to get halfway to the same distances between the struts, I have prepared suitable spacers, which have proven to be very helpful. 



And this is what the first finished railing looks like,



which fits perfectly on the template



and also goes well with the canister.



I wanted to take advantage of the fresh routine and immediately scratched the second Railing (G-1),



which has worked just as well.



However, all railings still need on their feet similar Holders as those on the Outriggers so that they can be erected and swung in as required.

***************
Regards from Germany

Manfred

Under construction:
1:144 Launch Pad 39A with Challenger STS-6

Offline roma847

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2280
  • Be part of it
  • Germany
  • Liked: 2069
  • Likes Given: 54
Re: Space Shuttle Launch Pad 39A with Challenger STS-6 (1:144)
« Reply #2355 on: 03/09/2023 10:27 pm »
Hello everybody,

but since I want to stay in the exercise, I'll scratch the remaining Railings first. Then it's the turn of the holder brackets.

Since the side struts are already cut off, these are the prepared struts for the two Railings G-2,



which were glued in the same manner.





And now the remaining Railings G-3 and G-4 can follow.



Once you know how to do it and the dimensions are known, it's nearly child's play.

***************
Regards from Germany

Manfred

Under construction:
1:144 Launch Pad 39A with Challenger STS-6

Offline roma847

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2280
  • Be part of it
  • Germany
  • Liked: 2069
  • Likes Given: 54
Re: Space Shuttle Launch Pad 39A with Challenger STS-6 (1:144)
« Reply #2356 on: 03/12/2023 10:41 pm »
Hello everybody,

and thus for gluing the remaining two Handrail pairs, again using the proven method,

here first Handrails G-3,





and here Handrails G-4.







And here is the obligatory test fitting atop the template that I like.



As already mentioned, however, all Handrails on the feet also need similar mounts like the Outriggers, so that they can be erected or folded up as required.

And these are 18 pieces, which should become similarly tiny.

« Last Edit: 03/12/2023 10:50 pm by roma847 »
***************
Regards from Germany

Manfred

Under construction:
1:144 Launch Pad 39A with Challenger STS-6

Offline roma847

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2280
  • Be part of it
  • Germany
  • Liked: 2069
  • Likes Given: 54
Re: Space Shuttle Launch Pad 39A with Challenger STS-6 (1:144)
« Reply #2357 on: 03/13/2023 05:47 pm »
Hello everybody,

well, the smaller the details to be scratched, the closer you have to look to see their shape and being able to determine the needed dimensions.

As you can see in this image section, the Holder sockets are in the form of small U-profiles in which the handrails are articulated.


Source: forum.nasaspaceflight.com (STS-9, Ares67)

Since this photo shows the canister used during STS-9 (11/1983), it can be assumed that these Handrails and Ladders already existed at the time of STS-6 (04/1983), but unfortunately I don't have any direct photos of it.

On the following photos of the Launch pad during STS-6 it looks like this,


Source: retrospaceimages.com (STS-6)

because you can see the holder sockets at least with high magnification, like here atop of the canister hanging in the RSS-Payload Bay,



and here during the exit from the Vertical Processing Facility (VPF).


Source: retrospaceimages.com (STS-6)



In this drawing I've finally determined the dimensions of the holders.


Source: James MacLaren, Page 52

And as you can plainly see, they are indeed tiny and, according to my previous idea, should each consist of four parts, which is why for 18 holders only 72 snippets would be needed.
Well that can still be going funny.

« Last Edit: 03/13/2023 05:48 pm by roma847 »
***************
Regards from Germany

Manfred

Under construction:
1:144 Launch Pad 39A with Challenger STS-6

Offline roma847

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2280
  • Be part of it
  • Germany
  • Liked: 2069
  • Likes Given: 54
Re: Space Shuttle Launch Pad 39A with Challenger STS-6 (1:144)
« Reply #2358 on: 03/17/2023 06:23 pm »
Hello everybody,

originally I had immediately thought of my narrowest Evergreen profiles, but both the H profiles and the U profiles are 1,5 mm wide, which would not match to the filigree handrails.

Then I've compared a Channel profile (1,3 mm) with my planned four-part variant (right), which, when using strips (0,2 mm x 0,75 mm) for the sides, is approx. 0,9 mm wide, which looks more pleasing in combination with the round rod ( 0,45 mm) of the handrail struts.



And if I would cut a Styrene strip (0,13mm x 0,75mm) for the sides, it should look even better and even closer to the size specified in the NASA drawing get there, what would mean a bit more effort.

So I've tried to scratch such a Prototype. But it's already not easy to cut a 0,75 mm wide strip, but which I managed to do. 

I then placed this strip upright on the ruler angle, clamped the Base strip (0,25 mm x 0,5 mm) in front of it and then both strips were carefully glued by using MEK at their connecting line. Then I glued a small strip onto the other side,



and let it dry.



Then I've carefully cut off a 1 mm long part from this U-profile with a razor blade,



which actually succeeded with the precautionary placed Jump away-Protection tape (left).



Now only the small end piece had to be glued and trimmed,



whereupon the test fitting of the first Mount on the handrail could take place.



Although the feasibility of the Prototype could be shown in principle, I have in mind a smarter solution for scratching of the remaining 17 mounts, by what the effort should let be reduce.

***************
Regards from Germany

Manfred

Under construction:
1:144 Launch Pad 39A with Challenger STS-6

Offline roma847

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2280
  • Be part of it
  • Germany
  • Liked: 2069
  • Likes Given: 54
Re: Space Shuttle Launch Pad 39A with Challenger STS-6 (1:144)
« Reply #2359 on: 03/18/2023 08:40 am »
Hello everybody, is there anybody in there?
And thus to this new variant for the production of the Handrail brackets that I have been thinking about.

The idea behind it is actually simple and based on the production of such a U profile with a greater length, from which I then carefully cut off small 1 mm long pieces and close on one side.

Thought and done, gluing the side strips (0,13 mm x 0,75 mm) to the base strip (0,25 mm x 0,5 mm) took place again in the proven manner by fixing between the rulers.



Such a Steel ruler is also ideal for aligning the U profile, which happens to be 0,5 mm thick as on commission.



Then the U profile was glued to the end strip (0,13 mm x 0,8 mm), which I deliberately left a little longer and fixed flat.



However, since my steel angle for the vertical alignment of the U profile offers much more support, I then chose this arrangement, which made the gluing much easier.



For final fixation while the Revell glue was drying, the deck ruler was moved to the stop,



whereby the U profile was glued perfectly.



For the separation of the end strip I've thought about this special fixation on a small steel block,



after which the razor blade was used.



To complete the bracket, only the end piece (1 mm) had to be separated from the U profile,



for what I needed five rulers for fixation, which I arranged in such a way that I could now use the razor blade to score at least the upper edge of the two side strips on the 1 mm line, which only has a minimal overhang (0,25 mm)



wherefore I had to take a close look myself with the headset magnifying glass over my glasses, assuming a steady hand.



For the final separation of the mount I only had to be able to recognize these fine incisions,



which is perhaps just visible here on this macro shot at an enlargement of 3553x2665,



therefore here again somewhat larger with marking.



When making a cut with a razor blade, the Jump away Protection tape is important in addition to a steady hand, which again has proven itself!



The advantage of this variant is that I can now use the remaining U profile to make another nine mounts in the same way,



wherewith the half would be done already.

« Last Edit: 03/18/2023 08:41 am by roma847 »
***************
Regards from Germany

Manfred

Under construction:
1:144 Launch Pad 39A with Challenger STS-6

Tags:
 

Advertisement NovaTech
Advertisement SkyTale Software GmbH
Advertisement Northrop Grumman
Advertisement
Advertisement Brady Kenniston
Advertisement NextSpaceflight
Advertisement Nathan Barker Photography
0