Author Topic: SCRUB: Astra – DARPA Challenge launch #1 – Kodiak – March 2, 2020  (Read 50597 times)

Online Steven Pietrobon

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Great view of the launch vehicle with mountains in the background. Looks a lot like Middle Earth from The Lord of the Rings! :-)
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Offline QuantumG

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https://twitter.com/wikkit/status/1234602758155538432

 ;D

Also kinda wondering why this thread wasn't moved to Live Events section.
Human spaceflight is basically just LARPing now.

Offline FlattestEarth

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$2mil scrub would be rough.

Online Steven Pietrobon

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Another update from Mike. Not much to report.
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Online Comga

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Launch window extended to 2:30 Alaska time, 3:30 PM Pacific Standard Time

edit: spelling
edit 2: Still no explanation of the hold.
They have to poll GO at least 15 minutes before the end of the launch window to resume countdown at T-15 minutes.
The pressure must be intense.
« Last Edit: 03/02/2020 09:49 pm by Comga »
What kind of wastrels would dump a perfectly good booster in the ocean after just one use?

Offline daedalus1

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It amazes me how a launcher developed in the fifties can launch through snowstorms yet a small launcher developed in the 21st century by the most technological advanced nation on earth struggles to even fly.
« Last Edit: 03/02/2020 09:51 pm by daedalus1 »

Offline brussell

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It amazes me how a launcher developed in the fifties can launch through snowstorms yet a small launcher developed in the 21st century by the most technological advanced nation on earth struggles to even fly.
Eh. It's the first attempt of this one. Plus look at the size, and how few people it takes to develop. That launcher you are talking about is huge and had armies of people behind.

Offline QuantumG

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$2mil scrub would be rough.

Plus the rest of the prize that they won't have the chance to win.
Human spaceflight is basically just LARPing now.

Offline lrk

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Scrubbed.  :(

Online Steven Pietrobon

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Scrubbing for the day!
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Offline thirtyone

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$2mil scrub would be rough.

Plus the rest of the prize that they won't have the chance to win.

Wasn't there some weather exemption for their deadline? Would seem reasonable, kind of sounds like they didn't exactly have a lot of days of good weather.

Online Comga

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Scrubbing for the day
And the competition
$2mil scrub would be rough.

Plus the rest of the prize that they won't have the chance to win.

Do you think that they could launch this outside of the DARPA Launch Challenge and still go for the other $8M by launching the second flight within a week of that?
What kind of wastrels would dump a perfectly good booster in the ocean after just one use?

Online Steven Pietrobon

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Mike will be having some interviews with Astra about today's events.
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Offline whitelancer64

It amazes me how a launcher developed in the fifties can launch through snowstorms yet a small launcher developed in the 21st century by the most technological advanced nation on earth struggles to even fly.

For the record, Soyuz has similar weather restrictions wrt precipitation and wind as the Shuttle / Falcon 9. They can launch in light rain, Soyuz can launch in light snow. The big difference is in the allowable temperatures.

Baikonur is horrible in terms of temperature extremes, so Soyuz has to withstand a very wide temperature range. Florida is much more temperate, so vehicles launched there can be designed with that in mind. 

Space is hard. Just as true now as it was in the 50s. Rolling the dice on a sensor reading is just as risky now as it was back then.
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Online Steven Pietrobon

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Interview with Astra co-founder and CEO. The problem could have affected the flight so had to scrub.
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Online Steven Pietrobon

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DARPA program manager. A lot of objectives were met, but it was a hard challenge.
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Online Steven Pietrobon

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End of coverage.
« Last Edit: 03/02/2020 10:16 pm by Steven Pietrobon »
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Offline zubenelgenubi

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Interview with Astra co-founder and CEO, [Chris Kemp]. The problem could have affected the flight so had to scrub.

Mention that the manufacture of "2 of 3" and "3 of 3" is well underway.

Particulars not given re: decision to hold countdown/scrub other than to say the data made it clear that it was unsafe to continue the launch.
***

DARPA program manager, [Todd Master]. A lot of objectives were met, but it was a hard challenge.
No more chances to win (this $2,000,000) DARPA Launch Challenge.
***

No mention made of when this launch will be rescheduled.
« Last Edit: 03/02/2020 11:21 pm by zubenelgenubi »
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Online FutureSpaceTourist

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Quote
ROCKET 1 OF 3, LAUNCH ATTEMPT 1
MARCH 2, 2020


Today, Astra began countdown of the first orbital launch as the final remaining competitor in the DARPA launch challenge. Our team decided to hold the launch at T-53 seconds after a sensor reported unexpected data that could have impacted the success of the flight. Out of our commitment to safety, and to increase the probability of overall success of the three-launch campaign, we have decided to prioritize fully investigating the issue over attempting to win the DARPA challenge today.

We are incredibly grateful to our team who have worked many late nights and weekends for the past few months to prepare our launch system for our first launch. We would also like to thank the team at DARPA, the FAA, and the team at Pacific Spaceport Complex for making an orbital launch attempt possible within a few days.

We remain determined to reach orbit and plan to attempt another launch attempt as soon as possible.  Thank you for the continued support as we move forward in our mission to observe, connect and improve life on earth.

https://astra.com/blog/launch-attempt-1/

Online FutureSpaceTourist

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https://twitter.com/johnkrausphotos/status/1234625589799055360

Quote
Astra’s Rocket 3.0 launch vehicle is seen at the Pacific Spaceport Complex — Alaska at sunrise this morning ahead of a scrubbed launch attempt this afternoon.
(Photo: Astra)

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