Author Topic: Delta IV-Heavy - NROL-91 - Vandenberg SLC-6 - 24 September 2022 (22:25 UTC)  (Read 63735 times)

Offline Vahe231991

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The SLC-2W launch site for the Firefly Alpha is far north of the SLC-6 launch site, and the Firefly Alpha is designed to carry out flight trajectories to the west, unlike the Delta IV Heavy being used to launch payloads into polar orbit. Therefore, the Firefly Alpha can't overfly SLC-6.

No, Firefly Alpha is designed for sun synchronous orbits, which are polar and hence SLC-6 is affected by the flight path, just as it was for Delta II launches from SLC-2.
The Firefly Alpha isn't exclusively intended for sun-synchronous polar orbits, it's also designed to carry satellites into near-equatorial orbits on a westward path. The next Firefly Alpha launch won't be intended to reach polar orbit, but the third Alpha launch (now planned for November) will.

Offline Welsh Dragon

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The SLC-2W launch site for the Firefly Alpha is far north of the SLC-6 launch site, and the Firefly Alpha is designed to carry out flight trajectories to the west, unlike the Delta IV Heavy being used to launch payloads into polar orbit. Therefore, the Firefly Alpha can't overfly SLC-6.

No, Firefly Alpha is designed for sun synchronous orbits, which are polar and hence SLC-6 is affected by the flight path, just as it was for Delta II launches from SLC-2.
The Firefly Alpha isn't exclusively intended for sun-synchronous polar orbits, it's also designed to carry satellites into near-equatorial orbits on a westward path. The next Firefly Alpha launch won't be intended to reach polar orbit, but the third Alpha launch (now planned for November) will.
Erm come again? Westward equatorial orbits? Where did you see that? The performance hit for that would be astronomical.

Offline Vahe231991

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The SLC-2W launch site for the Firefly Alpha is far north of the SLC-6 launch site, and the Firefly Alpha is designed to carry out flight trajectories to the west, unlike the Delta IV Heavy being used to launch payloads into polar orbit. Therefore, the Firefly Alpha can't overfly SLC-6.
No, Firefly Alpha is designed for sun synchronous orbits, which are polar and hence SLC-6 is affected by the flight path, just as it was for Delta II launches from SLC-2.
The Firefly Alpha isn't exclusively intended for sun-synchronous polar orbits, it's also designed to carry satellites into near-equatorial orbits on a westward path. The next Firefly Alpha launch won't be intended to reach polar orbit, but the third Alpha launch (now planned for November) will.
Erm come again? Westward equatorial orbits? Where did you see that? The performance hit for that would be astronomical.
I meant to say orbital launches with a westward trajectory, not equatorial orbit, since Vandenberg SFB is north of the equator. But that doesn't change the fact that the next Firefly Alpha launch will launch on a westward trajectory.

Offline Jim

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The SLC-2W launch site for the Firefly Alpha is far north of the SLC-6 launch site, and the Firefly Alpha is designed to carry out flight trajectories to the west, unlike the Delta IV Heavy being used to launch payloads into polar orbit. Therefore, the Firefly Alpha can't overfly SLC-6.

No, Firefly Alpha is designed for sun synchronous orbits, which are polar and hence SLC-6 is affected by the flight path, just as it was for Delta II launches from SLC-2.
The Firefly Alpha isn't exclusively intended for sun-synchronous polar orbits, it's also designed to carry satellites into near-equatorial orbits on a westward path. The next Firefly Alpha launch won't be intended to reach polar orbit, but the third Alpha launch (now planned for November) will.

Jesse.  Just admit you are posting incorrect information (again).  Because Firefly Alpha is designed for sun synchronous orbits, it can fly over SLC-6.   THAT IS THE POINT


Offline gongora

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For its next launch Firefly is going to 137 degrees and shouldn't go anywhere near SLC-6.  I expect that trajectory won't be commonly used after the initial test launch, but the conversation in this thread was about whether the upcoming Firefly and DIVH launches would conflict.

Offline Vahe231991

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For its next launch Firefly is going to 137 degrees and shouldn't go anywhere near SLC-6.  I expect that trajectory won't be commonly used after the initial test launch, but the conversation in this thread was about whether the upcoming Firefly and DIVH launches would conflict.
Maybe in a few days, photos will be released by ULA showing the components for the Delta IV Heavy earmarked for the NROL-91 launch being stacked up ahead of the launch next month.

Offline Jim

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For its next launch Firefly is going to 137 degrees and shouldn't go anywhere near SLC-6.  I expect that trajectory won't be commonly used after the initial test launch, but the conversation in this thread was about whether the upcoming Firefly and DIVH launches would conflict.
Maybe in a few days, photos will be released by ULA showing the components for the Delta IV Heavy earmarked for the NROL-91 launch being stacked up ahead of the launch next month.

It is already stacked

Offline zubenelgenubi

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The NextSpaceFlight page has listed this launch as NET September for some time.

Does anyone know why and can say?
« Last Edit: 07/31/2022 03:33 pm by zubenelgenubi »
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The NextSpaceFlight page has listed this launch as NET September for some time.

Does anyone know why and can say?

I've checked and it's in the DB as such since almost a year ago. I think it's meant to be "NET Q3 2022".
Astronomy & spaceflight geek penguin. In a relationship w/ Space Shuttle Discovery.

Offline Vahe231991

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The NextSpaceFlight page has listed this launch as NET September for some time.

Does anyone know why and can say?

I've checked and it's in the DB as such since almost a year ago. I think it's meant to be "NET Q3 2022".
August is part of Q3. As someone has noted on this thread, NRO at times keeps planned launch dates for upcoming launches confidential until the rocket for NRO missions reaches the launch pad.

Offline zubenelgenubi

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SFN Launch Schedule update, August 15:
NROL-91 launch NET September.
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Offline Vahe231991

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Quote
Attention now moves to the west coast and the Delta IV Heavy rocket, which ULA is readying for a September launch with the NROL-91 mission. This mission for the National Reconnaissance Office will likely see the deployment of a heavy optical imaging satellite.

https://www.nasaspaceflight.com/2022/08/atlas-final-sbirs-geo/
[Aug 4]
« Last Edit: 08/17/2022 02:25 am by zubenelgenubi »

Offline Josh_from_Canada

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Offline FutureSpaceTourist

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ULA photos
« Last Edit: 08/24/2022 11:22 pm by FutureSpaceTourist »

Offline Vahe231991

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ULA photos
Good to see photos of the Delta IV Heavy rocket earmarked for the NROL-91 launch.

Offline Rondaz

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NROL-91s Delta IV Heavy has been delivered and made vertical at Vandenberg! Integration of the fairing and encapsulated payload will follow.

Launch scheduled September 24
The final launch of DIVH from Vandenberg

https://twitter.com/ULaunchA360/status/1562726710373523464

Offline Newton_V

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That was all a couple months ago.  Wonder why it took so long to release these pics.

Offline russianhalo117

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NROL-91s Delta IV Heavy has been delivered and made vertical at Vandenberg! Integration of the fairing and encapsulated payload will follow.

Launch scheduled September 24
The final launch of DIVH from Vandenberg

https://twitter.com/ULaunchA360/status/1562726710373523464
Encapsulation and stacking should have already occurred per the notional timeline.
« Last Edit: 08/26/2022 02:06 am by russianhalo117 »

Offline zubenelgenubi

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September 24th
The ULA website has NROL-91 as the next ULA launch.  To me, that indicates it precedes the SES-20 and SES-21 launch.
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Offline Bubbinski

Iíll be in Lompoc on September 24th!

Is there an estimated launch time yet?
I'll even excitedly look forward to "flags and footprints" and suborbital missions. Just fly...somewhere.

 

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