Author Topic: Mating Payload and Launch Vehicle Assistance  (Read 8352 times)

Offline navetmaintech

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Mating Payload and Launch Vehicle Assistance
« on: 08/26/2006 10:17 pm »
I just want to say that, 1.  This is my first post and 2)  I love this site!
  OK, I'm trying to do a research paper on the Safety Related Issues Associated with mating Payloads to their Lift Vehicles.  I think I'm asking the wrong people or they're thinking I'm after classified information.  Can anyone point me in the direction on either and engineer with the time for a few questions, or a common-sense technican?
Navy guy makes good!

Offline Chris Bergin

RE: Mating Payload and Launch Vehicle Assistance
« Reply #1 on: 08/26/2006 10:43 pm »
Quote
navetmaintech - 26/8/2006  11:04 PM

I just want to say that, 1.  This is my first post and 2)  I love this site!
  OK, I'm trying to do a research paper on the Safety Related Issues Associated with mating Payloads to their Lift Vehicles.  I think I'm asking the wrong people or they're thinking I'm after classified information.  Can anyone point me in the direction on either and engineer with the time for a few questions, or a common-sense technican?

Welcome to the site, sir....and we have a lot of engineers, techs, managers etc. here who I'm sure will be able to help.
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Offline Jim

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Re: Mating Payload and Launch Vehicle Assistance
« Reply #2 on: 08/27/2006 12:53 am »
Lookup EWR 127-1  Or AFSPCMAN 90-20 ( I have to go to work to verify the last one)

Need to also find an LV MSPSP or an actual mate procedure, but I think there would ITAR issues

What are you trying to research speicifically?  The safety issues are well documented.

Offline navetmaintech

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Re: Mating Payload and Launch Vehicle Assistance
« Reply #3 on: 08/28/2006 03:07 pm »
Thanks for the help, Jim.  The title of my Term Paper is, "Safety-Related Issues in Mating Orbital Payloads with their Launch Vehicles".  Basically,
     - what does GE have to take into consideration prior to delivering a satellite to Boeing for launch on a Delta IV
     - what generic hurdles do the technicians need to take in mounting the satellite to it's base (unless GE already did it)
     - what generic processes need to be done in mounting the satellite in the shroud, and then to the Delta IV

In all of this, I'm thinking about issues related to technican qualifications, hazmat, weather, etc.  Anything safety related.  If I can't get enough information to build my thesis, I'll probably broaden the subject to include delivering the payload to it's orbit, so I can include flight planning.

     Thanks for the direction.  I'll be looking up EWR 127-1 and AFSPCMAN 90-20 today.

     A lot of this is my Dad's fault.  He was on staff with NASA through RCA and Bendix Corp for 21 years, and boy did he have a lot of stories to tell.  I guess that's why I chose this subject.
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Offline Jim

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Re: Mating Payload and Launch Vehicle Assistance
« Reply #4 on: 08/28/2006 03:31 pm »
Just some points:

GE no longer makes spacecraft, that division was bought out by Martin.
technican qualifications - is up to the individual companies (aside from local safety requirements)   Need to look at Astrotech's documents (on spacehab website) since most commercial spacecraft are processed there vs KSC or CCAFS
What a company does to prep its spacecraft is up to the company policies and spacecraft owner wrt to amount of testing and assembly.

You are going to have to asking the LV manufacturers directly and I think you have some issue, since this gets into propiety info and ITAR restrictions.  I can't provide you the Delta and Atlas Familarizational Guides for those reasons.  Same with spacecraft manufacturers.  You can get some of the LV users guide from each of the manfacturer's websites


This is the right document AFSPCMAN 91-710 ("Range Safety Users' Manual," issued 30 JUN 2004).

Offline aero313

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Re: Mating Payload and Launch Vehicle Assistance
« Reply #5 on: 08/28/2006 10:48 pm »
Jim's right.  All the LV manufacturers have user's guides on their websites that include information on the mission integration process.  All LVs that operate from the traditional US ranges use AFSPCMAN 91-710 as the safety bible.  91-710 replaced EWR 127-1.  I can't speak to how SeaLaunch works safety.

Without giving away any trade or ITAR secrets, I can tell you that the whole process of getting the satellite mated to the launch vehicle is a big part of the job of space launch and is frequently overlooked or underestimated by startup launch vehicle companies.  Most LV providers will designate a mission manager who has the responsibility to work with the satellite customer, understand all the requirements, and work with the LV personnel to accommodate those requirements.  A lot of documentation gets generated, including interface control documents (ICDs), interface verification plans, payload hazard analyses, and launch site procedures.  There are also things like coupled loads analysis, thermal analysis, launch window analysis, EMI/EMC analysis, etc that have to be done by the LV provider using information provided by the satellite customer.  These joint documents and analyses are reviewed and approved by all involved parties (mainly as a CYA function), which takes some time.  Any changes or discrepancies similarly go through a vetting process and are approved.  Once all the analyses and design is completed and the hardware is built, there are a series of safety tests of the interfaces (ie, no stray voltages, proper pin assignments on the interface connectors, fit checks of the mechanical interfaces) before the satellite and LV are physically mated.  There are also a series of functional tests after each step of the mating process.

It's interesting to note that after many years of talk (and talk, and talk) about responive launch vehicles and responsive satellites, Air Force Research Lab has finally seen the light and is starting to work on streamlining this mission integration process.  Some of us have been pushing this for years, but few people understand how much this effort contributes to the cost of space launch.

Offline navetmaintech

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Re: Mating Payload and Launch Vehicle Assistance
« Reply #6 on: 09/13/2006 03:57 pm »
Fellas,
    Thanks for the words.  I really appreciate it.  I appologize for posting then not getting back with you, but I was on orders and away from electronic access.
Aero313,  You're right on the nose with those safety tests.  I plan on that being a large part of my research, but again the proprietary nature may turn this into a paragraph!  Ugh.  Thank you all for the assistance, and talk to you later.
Alex
Navy guy makes good!

Offline navetmaintech

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Re: Mating Payload and Launch Vehicle Assistance
« Reply #7 on: 09/15/2006 01:48 am »
Jim / Aero313,
  I'm really starting to get my teeth into this subject.  I've been reviewing the Mission Planners Guide (public domain) that Boeing puts out.  I can really see where a streamlined integration process would make a huge impact.  I'm still curious about FAA-AST inspectors and the role they play in this series of evolutions.  Are they observing or reviewing the reports from a desk?  I'm getting mixed feedback on that.

   Anyone know someone at Orbital I could chat with regarding their air-launched system?

   Interesting developement, with Boeing's payload servicing contract getting extended.  Maybe I can pry open a door over there...

Alex
Navy guy makes good!

Offline astrobrian

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Offline Jim

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Re: Mating Payload and Launch Vehicle Assistance
« Reply #9 on: 09/15/2006 02:28 am »
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navetmaintech - 14/9/2006  9:35 PM

 1.  I'm still curious about FAA-AST inspectors and the role they play in this series of evolutions.

 
 2.  Interesting developement, with Boeing's payload servicing contract getting extended.  Maybe I can pry open a door over there...

1.  They are not involved with day to day work.  Only flight path issues.  OSHA and USAF/NASA safety still cover day to day ops.  

2.  This is only for station work and facility maintance.  They don't  process the ELV payloads, the spacecraft  and LV supplier do the work

Offline BFRC

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Re: Mating Payload and Launch Vehicle Assistance
« Reply #10 on: 10/20/2006 04:49 am »
EWR 127-1 has been replaced by AFSPCMAN 91-710. Take a look at chapt 3 and 6 from 127-1 or Volume 3 and 6 from 91-710

Offline BFRC

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Re: Mating Payload and Launch Vehicle Assistance
« Reply #11 on: 10/21/2006 02:44 am »
I have to add to my previous comment. While the ranges do use the 91-710 and EWR 127-1 they point you in the first chapters to a far more important standard. MIL STD 882. This details how a System Safety program should be run and how risk can be identified and controlled throughout the life of the system. Jim is right on target that there are many control documents that drive interfaces which are very invaluable. But the types of analyses that will root out true system level hazards (bent pin, fault tree (top-down), FMECA (bottoms-up)) are born out of a good system safety program and none define it better than MILSTD 882.

Offline Jim

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Re: Mating Payload and Launch Vehicle Assistance
« Reply #12 on: 10/21/2006 04:42 am »
However, MILSTD 882 is not applicable to commercial or NASA spacecraft.  I need the find the document # of the NASA payload safety "guide"

Offline BFRC

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Re: Mating Payload and Launch Vehicle Assistance
« Reply #13 on: 10/21/2006 05:41 am »
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Jim - 20/10/2006  9:25 PM

However, MILSTD 882 is not applicable to commercial or NASA spacecraft.  I need the find the document # of the NASA payload safety "guide"


True. But it certainly warrants a look for the purposes of a research paper on the topic. 127-1 and 91-710  (both applicable to commercial and NASA programs while at VAFB and CCAFS) were built with 882 as a backbone.

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