Author Topic: Triana (GoreSat) DSCO (DSCOVR) Discussion Thread  (Read 66678 times)

Offline MP99

Re: Triana (GoreSat) DSCO (DSCOVR) Discussion Thread
« Reply #160 on: 01/09/2013 06:32 pm »
Since someone linked to this thread...

http://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=30543.0

cheers, Martin

Online gwiz

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Re: Triana (GoreSat) DSCO (DSCOVR) Discussion Thread
« Reply #161 on: 01/10/2013 09:30 am »
Wow, is that a record for a cold storage spacecraft to actually be launched?
RCA had a bunch of Transit satellites in storage from the late 1960s.  Last was launched in 1988.

Offline kevin-rf

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Re: Triana (GoreSat) DSCO (DSCOVR) Discussion Thread
« Reply #162 on: 01/10/2013 12:42 pm »
Sounds like we need a thread, satellites that where stored a very long time before launch. Where not DSP's also built in batches, then launched at a later date?
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Offline Jim

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Re: Triana (GoreSat) DSCO (DSCOVR) Discussion Thread
« Reply #163 on: 01/10/2013 01:55 pm »
Sounds like we need a thread, satellites that where stored a very long time before launch. Where not DSP's also built in batches, then launched at a later date?

Same goes for DSCS, A3 flew after B1-B14.  Same goes for GPS.  It happens any time there is a multi vehicle buy
« Last Edit: 01/10/2013 01:56 pm by Jim »

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Re: Triana (GoreSat) DSCO (DSCOVR) Discussion Thread
« Reply #164 on: 04/26/2013 03:08 am »
Sounds like we need a thread, satellites that where stored a very long time before launch. Where not DSP's also built in batches, then launched at a later date?

There were a couple of DSPs that were stored for a long time, modernized, then launched. I think they were Flights 11-12, but you can look it up.

I believe that the same thing happened with SDS 1, which was an engineering test article that later got refurbished and flown as Flight 7. I'd have to check my notes.

Offline Chris Bergin

Re: Triana (GoreSat) DSCO (DSCOVR) Discussion Thread
« Reply #165 on: 04/30/2013 10:03 pm »
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Offline kevin-rf

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Re: Triana (GoreSat) DSCO (DSCOVR) Discussion Thread
« Reply #166 on: 05/01/2013 12:11 am »
:)
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Offline Danderman

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Re: Triana (GoreSat) DSCO (DSCOVR) Discussion Thread
« Reply #167 on: 12/27/2013 06:55 pm »
DSCOVR Mission Moves Forward to 2015 Launch

http://www.nasa.gov/content/goddard/dscovr-mission-moves-forward-to-2015-launch/#.Ur3bEPvy3pc

The development of NOAA's upcoming Deep Space Climate Observatory known as DSCOVR, a satellite designed to monitor and warn of harmful solar activity that could impact Earth, last week cleared a major review and is on track to launch by early fiscal 2015.

The Key Decision Point C Review was conducted by the joint NASA-NOAA Program Management Council reviewed the complete budget and development plans for DSCOVR through launch to its end of life. Passing the review allows the NASA DSCOVR project at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md. to proceed with the implementation phase and continue the development of the spacecraft and its ground segment.

DSCOVR will orbit at the L1 libration point -- where the sun’s and Earth’s gravitational pull cancels – approximately one million miles away from Earth towards the sun. At that location, the satellite will measure solar storms before they reach the planet.

The DSCOVR mission is a partnership between NOAA, NASA and the U.S. Air Force.

NOAA will operate the DSCOVR mission, giving advanced warning of approaching solar storms with the potential to cripple electrical grids, communications, GPS navigation, air travel, satellite operations and human spaceflight. Experts estimate damages from these types of severe solar storms could range between $1- $2 trillion.

NASA, using NOAA funds, refurbished the DSCOVR satellite and instruments, which had been in storage for several years. NASA is also developing the ground system to be used to operate the DSCOVR satellite. The U.S. Air Force is providing the SpaceX Falcon 9 launch vehicle for DSCOVR mission.

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