Author Topic: SpaceX Falcon 9 / Dragon 2 : SpX-DM1 : March 2, 2019 : DISCUSSION  (Read 549121 times)

Offline Brian45

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I keep reading articles related to the crew dragon mission that characterize the DM1 flight as "nearly" flawless. Could anyone please expand on what occurred that was not to plan? (Other than the parachute drapery)
thanks

Offline Vettedrmr

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Honestly, the only thing I heard was that the ambient temp in D2's cabin was 82F, not at the 80F set point.  There was a supposed isopropyl alcohol odor that happened shortly after the hatch was opened, but I think that was attributed to ISS.

If there's anything beyond that I don't know of it.

Have a good one,
Mike
Aviation/space enthusiast, retired control system SW engineer, doesn't know anything!

Offline octavo

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There was a supposed isopropyl alcohol odor that happened shortly after the hatch was opened, but I think that was attributed to ISS.


I do not think it was attributed to ISS. There is some information on the L2 ISS section that is relevant to this. Have not seen anything about it since, despite looking.

Offline JohnLloydJones

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There was a supposed isopropyl alcohol odor that happened shortly after the hatch was opened, but I think that was attributed to ISS.


I do not think it was attributed to ISS. There is some information on the L2 ISS section that is relevant to this. Have not seen anything about it since, despite looking.
Given that they tested the air in Dragon before circulating ISS air, I would suspect that the isopropanol is more likely to have come from the cargo items being unpacked than Dragon itself.

Offline octavo

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There was a supposed isopropyl alcohol odor that happened shortly after the hatch was opened, but I think that was attributed to ISS.


I do not think it was attributed to ISS. There is some information on the L2 ISS section that is relevant to this. Have not seen anything about it since, despite looking.
Given that they tested the air in Dragon before circulating ISS air, I would suspect that the isopropanol is more likely to have come from the cargo items being unpacked than Dragon itself.
I would have thought that too, but if it was cargo doing it, then that cargo wasn't unpacked.

Edit: upon rereading the ISS thread, I now understand why no one is talking much about it. The levels (while much higher than normal iss background) were still well below the maximum allowable for a visiting vehicle. Like, weeeeelll below.
« Last Edit: 03/26/2019 02:51 pm by octavo »

Online Johnnyhinbos

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Wasn’t sure if this qualified as an update, but apparently Little Earth is continuing his mission by helping the NFGs get around their new home.

(When we go on dive expeditions to collect animals for our aquarium the first time staff members are referred to as the NFGs - short for, er, New Falcon Guys)

https://nasa.tumblr.com/post/183818728674/the-international-space-station-through-the-eyes/amp?__twitter_impression=true
John Hanzl. Author, action / adventure www.johnhanzl.com

Offline Rondaz

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NASA’s Commercial Crew Program: Boeing Test Flight Dates and SpaceX Demo-2 Update

Anna Heiney Posted on April 3, 2019

NASA and Boeing are nearing the final stages of development and evaluation for crew systems that will return human spaceflight launches from American soil on missions to the International Space Station as part of the agency’s Commercial Crew Program. To meet NASA’s requirements, the commercial providers must demonstrate that their systems are ready to begin regular flights to the space station.

Boeing now is targeting the company’s uncrewed mission, called Orbital Flight Test, in August 2019, although this is a working target date and to be confirmed. The CST-100 Starliner will launch atop a United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket from Space Launch Complex 41 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida. The decision to adjust the launch date was guided by limited launch opportunities in April and May, as well as a critical U.S. Air Force national security launch – AEHF-5 – atop a United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket from Space Launch Complex 41 in June.

Following the uncrewed flight, Boeing is planning to fly a test mission with crew on board to the space station in late 2019, with the specific date to be confirmed closer to that timeframe. NASA and Boeing have agreed to extend the duration of that flight test to the International Space Station after completing an in-depth technical assessment of the Starliner systems. Boeing also will fly a Pad Abort Test before those two orbital flights to demonstrate the company’s ability to safely carry astronauts away from a launch vehicle emergency, if necessary. Find a full mission and Boeing progress feature here: https://go.nasa.gov/2FM8zcQ.

Following the test flights, NASA will review performance data and resolve any necessary issues to certify the systems for operational missions. NASA and Boeing are actively working to be ready for the operational missions. As with all human spaceflight vehicle development, learning from each test and adjusting as necessary to reduce risk to the crew may override planning dates.

The following planning dates reflect updated schedule inputs for Boeing’s test flights as of March 26, 2019.

Test Flight Planning Dates:
Boeing Pad Abort Test: Summer 2019
Boeing Orbital Flight Test (uncrewed): current target working date August 2019
Boeing Crew Flight Test (crewed): current target working date late 2019

SpaceX Demo-2 Update

NASA also is working with SpaceX to return human spaceflight launches to American soil. The company completed an uncrewed flight test, known as Demo-1, to the space station in March. SpaceX now is processing the same Crew Dragon spacecraft for an in-flight abort test. The company then will fly a flight test with a crew, known as Demo-2, to the station.

NASA’s Commercial Crew Program and SpaceX are expected to reevaluate its target test dates in the next couple weeks.

https://blogs.nasa.gov/commercialcrew/2019/04/03/nasas-commercial-crew-program-boeing-test-flight-dates-and-spacex-demo-2-update/

Offline aviators99

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Have there been any (released) images and/or telemetry data from Ripley, during and/or after reentry?

Offline woods170

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Have there been any (released) images and/or telemetry data from Ripley, during and/or after reentry?

No. Images might appear at some point in time. But telemetry and data won't appear publically because that's SpaceX property.

Offline flyright

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For historical record: SpaceX’s statement in case of Demo-1 Crew Dragon parachute failure


This can be confusing.
Not sure this is needed "for historical record" when the parachutes actually deployed and the mission was successful.

Offline mme

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For historical record: SpaceX’s statement in case of Demo-1 Crew Dragon parachute failure


This can be confusing.
Not sure this is needed "for historical record" when the parachutes actually deployed and the mission was successful.
Agreed. Seems more likely to be useful for people that will warp it to their own ends. I'd be curious where the audio comes from, someone really messed up.

Musk said reentry was the largest risk because of the unique mold line. I imagine that was the driver of this, not the parachutes. Being prepared for failure is not an indictment of SpaceX, it shows they take the risks serious.
Space is not Highlander.  There can, and will, be more than one.

Offline Draggendrop

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« Last Edit: 05/15/2019 03:14 am by gongora »

Offline jee_c2

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Offline jee_c2

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Sorry, missed some pages.. reading on mobile..

Offline gongora

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https://twitter.com/planet4589/status/1417647722564308998
Quote
Crew Dragon's DM-1 test mission was launched in Mar 2019 and left its trunk in a 394 x 401 km orbit. The trunk reentered on Jul 20

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