Author Topic: LIVE: SpaceX Falcon 9/Dragon CRS-1 (SpX-1) LAUNCH UPDATES  (Read 163653 times)

Offline John44

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Offline jacqmans

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SPACEX LAUNCHES FIRST OFFICIAL CARGO RESUPPLY MISSION TO SPACE STATION

 

Cape Canaveral, FL — Space Exploration Technologies (SpaceX) today successfully launched its Dragon spacecraft aboard a Falcon 9 rocket on the first official cargo resupply mission to the International Space Station. The launch went off on schedule at 8:35 p.m. ET from Launch Complex 40 in Cape Canaveral, Florida.

The SpaceX CRS-1 mission marks the first of at least 12 SpaceX missions to the space station under the company’s cargo resupply contract with NASA. On board the Dragon spacecraft are materials to support investigations planned for the station’s Expedition 33 crew, as well as crew supplies and space station hardware.

Dragon – the only space station cargo craft capable of returning a significant amount of supplies back to Earth -- will return with scientific materials and space station hardware.

The Falcon 9 rocket, powered by nine Merlin engines, performed nominally today during every phase of its approach to orbit, including two stage separations, solar array deployment, and the final push of Dragon into its intended orbit. Dragon will now chase the space station before beginning a series of burns that will bring it into close proximity to the station. If all goes well, Dragon will attach to the complex on October 10 and spend over two weeks there before an expected return to Earth on October 28.

“We are right where we need to be at this stage in the mission,” said Elon Musk, CEO and Chief Technical Officer, SpaceX. “We still have a lot of work to do, of course, as we guide Dragon’s approach to the space station. But the launch was an unqualified success.”

The CRS-1 mission follows a historic demonstration flight last May when SpaceX’s Dragon became the first commercial spacecraft to attach to the space station, exchange cargo, and return safely to Earth. The flight signaled restoration of American capability to resupply the space station, not possible since the retirement of the space shuttle in 2011.

About SpaceX

SpaceX designs, manufactures, and launches the world's most advanced rockets and spacecraft. The company was founded in 2002 by Elon Musk to revolutionize space transportation, with the ultimate goal of enabling people to live on other planets. Today, SpaceX is advancing the boundaries of space technology through its Falcon launch vehicles and Dragon spacecraft. SpaceX is a private company owned by management and employees, with minority investments from Founders Fund, Draper Fisher Jurvetson, and Valor Equity Partners. The company has more than 1,800 employees in California, Texas, Washington, D.C., and Florida. For more information, visit SpaceX.com.

Offline hektor

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Could the extra performance required from the second stage to reach orbit after first stage problem have depleted the second stage in such a way that it wasn't able to perform the Orbcomm part of the mission ?

Offline jacqmans

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Liftoff of Falcon 9 and Dragon from Launch Complex 40 in Cape Canaveral, Fl. October 7, 2012. Credit: SpaceX
« Last Edit: 10/08/2012 07:21 am by jacqmans »

Offline Liss

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Wow, as Mrs. Clinton used to say. Hats off to Musk -- a good vehicle he made!
Is it the first time when first stage engine anomaly did not lead to loss of mission? On Saturn 5, we've had upper stage anomalies...
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Offline pericynthion

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Could the extra performance required from the second stage to reach orbit after first stage problem have depleted the second stage in such a way that it wasn't able to perform the Orbcomm part of the mission ?

Gravity loss from one engine out in first stage for 90 seconds is probably < 50 m/s, whereas the injection burn for Orbcomm was supposed to be around 100 m/s and you'd think they'd have SOME performance margin, paricularly with such a lightly-loaded Dragon.

Offline Galactic Penguin SST

Could the extra performance required from the second stage to reach orbit after first stage problem have depleted the second stage in such a way that it wasn't able to perform the Orbcomm part of the mission ?

Gravity loss from one engine out in first stage for 90 seconds is probably < 50 m/s, whereas the injection burn for Orbcomm was supposed to be around 100 m/s and you'd think they'd have SOME performance margin, paricularly with such a lightly-loaded Dragon.

As quoted somewhere earlier in this thread, apparently the Orbcomm satellite would be deployed into the Dragon separation orbit if several health checks failed before the second burn. Maybe the shutdown of a first stage engine and the resulted "late arrival" into orbit means that the extra burn was aborted?

Note that apparently this Orbcomm satellite will be used for testing, so deployment into the operational orbit may not be necessary.
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Offline Ben the Space Brit

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Right now, most of this is speculation.  We can only say for certain that one core engine shut down after the transit through max-q and that, consequently, the core stage burn was much longer than normal.

Has there been any official statement from SpaceX about any effects from the early core engine #1 shut-down (and apparent explosive failure)? Has ORBCOMM said whether their prototype has reached the expected orbit or had to be aborted to LEO?

And Chris, I'm assuming that we'll see the opening of an SpX Mission Updates thread soon?  ;)
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Online Skyrocket

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There were satellites other than the ORBCOMM onboard.

Is this your assumption or do you have information to support this?

Offline pericynthion

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Has ORBCOMM said whether their prototype has reached the expected orbit or had to be aborted to LEO?

They haven't said anything yet but Space-Track is showing 6 objects in the Dragon insertion orbit and none in the planned Orbcomm orbit.

Note that apparently this Orbcomm satellite will be used for testing, so deployment into the operational orbit may not be necessary.

Extremely low orbits can be a pain for smaller satellites due to aerodynamic disturbance torques - if the attitude control system was designed for a higher orbit it might not be able to cope with the disturbances in a lower one.  Orbcomm's testbed satellite is only "kinda small" rather than "really small" so hopefully it will be ok, just with a reduced operational lifespan.  My guess is they will use some of their stationkeeping propellant to raise the orbit some.

Offline QuantumG

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There were satellites other than the ORBCOMM onboard.

Is this your assumption or do you have information to support this?

Gwynne said so in the preflight briefing.
Human spaceflight is basically just LARPing now.

Online Chris Bergin

Thanks for keeping the coverage going guys. I'll be back off the day job later on and we'll see what extra we can get on the engine etc, along with events coming up pre-berth.
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Online Chris Bergin


And Chris, I'm assuming that we'll see the opening of an SpX Mission Updates thread soon?  ;)

Yes sir :)

I'm "assuming" good GNC door, but it'll be nice to see that confirmed. Let me go through the L2 ISS guys when they are on, as they'll know.
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Online Skyrocket

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There were satellites other than the ORBCOMM onboard.

Is this your assumption or do you have information to support this?

Gwynne said so in the preflight briefing.


Any info, which other satellites these are?

Offline QuantumG

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There were satellites other than the ORBCOMM onboard.

Is this your assumption or do you have information to support this?

Gwynne said so in the preflight briefing.


Any info, which other satellites these are?

Nope. The word used was "smaller", but I expect they're cubesats.
Human spaceflight is basically just LARPing now.

Online Chris Bergin

Hmmm, picosats etc? Can't be the ones via the deal with Spaceflight as that's not until next year:

http://www.nasaspaceflight.com/2012/06/spacex-deal-falcon-9s-secondary-payload-manifest/

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Offline hektor

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For the time being Gunter lists Dragon C3 and Orbcomm FM44

Offline Ronsmytheiii

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Video overview for Orbcomm


Offline ohlongjohnson

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I can't find a time for the next press conference (I read something like Monday evening).
Is the time already set?

Offline Tcommon

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Could the extra performance required from the second stage to reach orbit after first stage problem have depleted the second stage in such a way that it wasn't able to perform the Orbcomm part of the mission ?

Gravity loss from one engine out in first stage for 90 seconds is probably < 50 m/s, ...

hopefully a little less, given the explosion and debris shedding ;)
« Last Edit: 10/08/2012 01:18 pm by Tcommon »

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