Author Topic: ABL Space Systems (smallsat launchers)  (Read 89140 times)

Offline soyuzu

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Re: ABL Space Systems (smallsat launchers)
« Reply #240 on: 06/20/2022 05:28 am »
Just incase anyone missed it, ABL updated their site with some more info in RS-1 as well as a payload user guide.

https://ablspacesystems.com/rs1/

How does 9 x 11000 lbf engine produce 133118 lbf of thrust? :o

Also from the launch manual it seems to have a lift-off TWR of ~1.25

Online Welsh Dragon

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Re: ABL Space Systems (smallsat launchers)
« Reply #241 on: 06/20/2022 07:52 am »
Presumably they think they can be a viable business targeting only US customers? Since they don't even bother to provide measurements suitable for the rest of the world? Bold choice.

Online Daniels30

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Re: ABL Space Systems (smallsat launchers)
« Reply #242 on: 06/20/2022 09:38 am »
Got some great new images on the updated website!
 
1) E2 Vacuum extension
2) 3 E2 Sea Level engines
3) Base of Stage 1 and associated plumbing.
« Last Edit: 06/20/2022 09:40 am by Daniels30 »
“There are a thousand things that can happen when you go to light a rocket engine, and only one of them is good.” -
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Offline TrevorMonty

Re: ABL Space Systems (smallsat launchers)
« Reply #243 on: 06/20/2022 10:28 am »
Presumably they think they can be a viable business targeting only US customers? Since they don't even bother to provide measurements suitable for the rest of the world? Bold choice.
LM has booked quite few launches with them.
« Last Edit: 06/23/2022 11:31 pm by zubenelgenubi »

Online ZachS09

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Re: ABL Space Systems (smallsat launchers)
« Reply #244 on: 06/20/2022 06:46 pm »
Just incase anyone missed it, ABL updated their site with some more info in RS-1 as well as a payload user guide.

https://ablspacesystems.com/rs1/

How does 9 x 11000 lbf engine produce 133118 lbf of thrust? :o

Also from the launch manual it seems to have a lift-off TWR of ~1.25

It’s probably 133,118 lbf (~14,790 lbf each) in vacuum.
Liftoff for St. Jude's! Go Dragon, Go Falcon, Godspeed Inspiration4!

Offline trimeta

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Re: ABL Space Systems (smallsat launchers)
« Reply #245 on: 06/21/2022 05:23 am »
Just incase anyone missed it, ABL updated their site with some more info in RS-1 as well as a payload user guide.

https://ablspacesystems.com/rs1/

Odd that they call this "version 1" of their Payload User's Guide, since I have a document from them dated 3 August 2020 which they were already calling "version 2" of their guide (with "version 1" said to have released on 31 January 2018).

Skimming through, the newer version has slightly lower performance to higher altitudes, but slightly higher first-stage thrust. The payload fairing has grown a bit (even the smaller of the new options is bigger than the old one), which helps since it was always a bit on the small side, but they did do away with the dedicated Cubesat bay below the main payload area. I invite others to explore the two documents to find any other salient differences.

Online Daniels30

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Re: ABL Space Systems (smallsat launchers)
« Reply #246 on: 07/11/2022 05:42 pm »
This weekend we wrapped up a big push towards Flight 1, with the completion of Stage 1 staticfire. The operation verified our startup sequence and stage level engine performance. It was also a key demonstration of our GS0 Launch Stool, which packs into a container and enables launch from a flat pad. A testament to our team’s intense preparation, we completed the test on the first attempt.
 
In parallel, Stage 2 completed a battery of key pre-flight checkouts. First, we went outside to perform telemetry tests. We transmitted data from Stage 2 to a ground station and integrated the telemetry to our mission control systems. We also completed an end-to-end checkout of the flight termination system, verifying RS1 can receive safety commands from the ground and act accordingly. We went back in the hangar to complete polarity checkouts, which ensure that all steering systems operate properly based on vehicle sensor data. Finally, we initiated vehicle-in-the-loop (VITL) testing on Stage 2. An extension of our hardware-in-the-loop (HITL) test regime, in VITL we run our flight algorithms directly on the hardware that will fly.
 
At this point, each stage has individually completed all major pre-flight tests. Next, we’ll prepare for stage mate to perform final checkouts on the fully stacked vehicle and perform a wet dress rehearsal. Following that, launch!




Harry O'Hanley: https://www.linkedin.com/feed/update/urn:li:activity:6952302750210686976/
“There are a thousand things that can happen when you go to light a rocket engine, and only one of them is good.” -
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Offline Steven Pietrobon

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Re: ABL Space Systems (smallsat launchers)
« Reply #247 on: 07/12/2022 06:43 am »
That's an unusual engine configuration! Nine engines in a circle. I wonder if they'll add a centre engine to allow the vehicle to be recovered.
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Offline Zed_Noir

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Re: ABL Space Systems (smallsat launchers)
« Reply #248 on: 07/12/2022 04:55 pm »
That's an unusual engine configuration! Nine engines in a circle. I wonder if they'll add a centre engine to allow the vehicle to be recovered.
My speculation. Presuming they can relit the engines.
 
Think a triplet of engines moving in synchronization could work for vehicle control. While the remaining engines with converging exhaust plumes should be enough for reentry thermal protection. For landing doing a hover slam with a triplet of engines firing in a cosine manner might work. (Triplet as in 3 engines in equal distance from each other)

The current 9 engines in a ring configuration simplified the plumbing for the propellants and booster assembly.

Offline edzieba

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Re: ABL Space Systems (smallsat launchers)
« Reply #249 on: 07/12/2022 04:55 pm »
It does sidestep the need for most of the thrust structure or a high strength aft dome: closer you can mount the engines to the tank wall, the less structural mass you need to transfer the thrust load to the tank wall.
Super Heavy takes it to the extreme and flares the base to accommodate engines mounted almost directly under the tank wall, but an alternative (if you accept a lower TWR at liftoff) would be to use the TVC to 'tuck' the bells in under the tank body at liftoff to clear the launch mount, eat the cosine loss for the first couple of metres of ascent, then straighten them out again once clear.

Offline Steven Pietrobon

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Re: ABL Space Systems (smallsat launchers)
« Reply #250 on: 07/13/2022 05:58 am »
For landing doing a hover slam with a triplet of engines firing in a cosine manner might work. (Triplet as in 3 engines in equal distance from each other)

The Falcon 9 barely does a hover slam with one engine! Doing it with three might be a step too far. Perhaps the solution is to come down using one of the outer engines with the stage titled so as to balance the thrust force. The leg on that side of the thrusting engine touches down first with the rocket then slamming down on the other side! :-)
« Last Edit: 07/13/2022 05:59 am by Steven Pietrobon »
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Offline jdon759

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Re: ABL Space Systems (smallsat launchers)
« Reply #251 on: 07/13/2022 07:41 am »
That's an unusual engine configuration! Nine engines in a circle. I wonder if they'll add a centre engine to allow the vehicle to be recovered.

Given the size of their rocket, I think it is vastly more likely that they follow the parachute method Rocket Lab is pioneering if they decide to recover their first stage. 
I don't follow ABL very thoroughly, have they even indicated an intention to recover their boosters?

Offline PM3

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Re: ABL Space Systems (smallsat launchers)
« Reply #252 on: 07/13/2022 07:43 am »
There are no plans for a reusable RS1. ABL is optimizing for most simple and cheap design, not for innovation. Churn out and expend low-cost rockets.

Actually noone is developing a reusable booster in the 1-ton-class.
« Last Edit: 07/13/2022 07:52 am by PM3 »
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Offline TrevorMonty

Re: ABL Space Systems (smallsat launchers)
« Reply #253 on: 07/13/2022 11:57 am »

There are no plans for a reusable RS1. ABL is optimizing for most simple and cheap design, not for innovation. Churn out and expend low-cost rockets.

Actually noone is developing a reusable booster in the 1-ton-class.

Both Relativity and Firefly have larger RLVs in pipeline so not likely to waste resources on making their 1t LVs reuseable. For ABL on the other hand it maybe worth it especially given number of missions on their books.

The 1t class boosters should be light enough for MAR, but can they reenter without reentry burn.
« Last Edit: 07/13/2022 08:25 pm by zubenelgenubi »

Offline zubenelgenubi

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Re: ABL Space Systems (smallsat launchers)
« Reply #254 on: 08/11/2022 09:39 pm »
Cross-post:
https://twitter.com/jeff_foust/status/1557754907901304834
Quote
Jeff Foust @jeff_foust
A couple other notes from the launch session at #smallsat:

- Moog says its SL-OMV tug is on track for launch in 1st quarter of 2023 on ABL’s RS1 from SaxaVord on the UK Pathfinder launch. [Aug 11]
« Last Edit: 08/11/2022 09:39 pm by zubenelgenubi »
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Offline Conexion Espacial

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Re: ABL Space Systems (smallsat launchers)
« Reply #255 on: 08/18/2022 07:56 pm »

The company's CEO commented on his Linkedin profile that they are already working on the second and third launches of the RS1 rocket, according to the current manifest, these rockets will launch the first two missions of Amazon's Kuiper constellation.
https://www.linkedin.com/posts/harry-o-hanley-27087382_while-were-running-through-final-preparations-activity-6956272419309309952-aYnl
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Offline Ronsmytheiii

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Online gongora

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Re: ABL Space Systems (smallsat launchers)
« Reply #257 on: 09/21/2022 09:33 pm »
1616-EX-ST-2022
Quote
The purpose of ABL Space System’s DEMO-2 mission is a second flight to demonstrate the RS1 launch vehicle is ready to support launches from the United States. The DEMO-2 mission will be launched from Pacific Spaceport Complex – Alaska (PSCA) Pad 3 (57.430684 N, 152.353028 W). The target launch date is Q4 2022. The vehicle will reach a 200 km x 350 km orbit inclined at 87° at which point two (2) 6U payloads will be deployed. After payload deployment, if propellant residuals permit, the second stage engine will relight and perform an orbit raising maneuver to circularize the orbit to 350 km x 350 km inclined at 87°. Telemetry transmission from the vehicle will downlink using 2211 MHz and 2287.5 MHz through the duration of the flight. Ground stations for the mission are located in Alaska (57.455257N, 152.373381W), Hawaii (21.6705 N, 158.035 W) , and South Africa (25.885503 S, 27.706942 E).

NET November
« Last Edit: 09/21/2022 09:34 pm by gongora »

Offline Foximus

Re: ABL Space Systems (smallsat launchers)
« Reply #258 on: 09/21/2022 10:19 pm »
1616-EX-ST-2022
Quote
The purpose of ABL Space System’s DEMO-2 mission is a second flight to demonstrate the RS1 launch vehicle is ready to support launches from the United States. The DEMO-2 mission will be launched from Pacific Spaceport Complex – Alaska (PSCA) Pad 3 (57.430684 N, 152.353028 W). The target launch date is Q4 2022. The vehicle will reach a 200 km x 350 km orbit inclined at 87° at which point two (2) 6U payloads will be deployed. After payload deployment, if propellant residuals permit, the second stage engine will relight and perform an orbit raising maneuver to circularize the orbit to 350 km x 350 km inclined at 87°. Telemetry transmission from the vehicle will downlink using 2211 MHz and 2287.5 MHz through the duration of the flight. Ground stations for the mission are located in Alaska (57.455257N, 152.373381W), Hawaii (21.6705 N, 158.035 W) , and South Africa (25.885503 S, 27.706942 E).

so this makes it sound like back to back missions.  Interesting, as I thought they were headed to the Cape after Kodiak and before the UK.

NET November

Offline brickmack

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Re: ABL Space Systems (smallsat launchers)
« Reply #259 on: 09/24/2022 05:03 pm »
That's an unusual engine configuration! Nine engines in a circle. I wonder if they'll add a centre engine to allow the vehicle to be recovered.

Seems they intend to evolve to an aerospike, at least for a tech demo, so that area needs to remain open https://aviationweek.com/defense-space/aircraft-propulsion/afrl-responsive-space-aerospike-flight-tests-track-2023 (paywalled, but has an image of interest)

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