Author Topic: SpaceX F9 : Project Kuiper Flight 1 : Florida? : NET mid-2025  (Read 2313 times)

Online Galactic Penguin SST

Well well well well...imagine the face of the CEO who needs to sign this...

https://www.aboutamazon.com/news/innovation-at-amazon/amazon-project-kuiper-spacex-launch

Amazon secures 3 launches with SpaceX to support Project Kuiper deployment

Additional capacity will supplement existing launch contracts to support Project Kuiperís satellite deployment schedule.

Amazon has signed a contract with SpaceX for three Falcon 9 launches to support deployment plans for Project Kuiper, Amazonís low Earth orbit (LEO) satellite broadband network. Project Kuiper satellites were designed from the start to accommodate multiple launch providers and vehicles, allowing us to reduce schedule risk and move faster in our mission to connect unserved and underserved communities around the world. Our earlier procurement of 77 heavy-lift rockets from Arianespace, Blue Origin, and United Launch Alliance (ULA) provides enough capacity to launch the majority of our satellite constellation, and the additional launches with SpaceX offer even more capacity to support our deployment schedule.

SpaceXís Falcon 9 is a reusable, two-stage launch vehicle designed for the reliable and safe transport of people and payloads into Earth orbit and beyond, and it has completed more than 270 successful launches to date. Project Kuiper has contracted three Falcon 9 launches, and these missions are targeted to lift off beginning in mid-2025.

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« Last Edit: 12/01/2023 07:02 pm by Galactic Penguin SST »
Astronomy & spaceflight geek penguin. In a relationship w/ Space Shuttle Discovery. Current Priority: Chasing the Chinese Spaceflight Wonder Egg & A Certain Chinese Mars Rover

Offline FutureSpaceTourist

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https://twitter.com/elonmusk/status/1730680623625392540

Quote
SpaceX launches competitor satellite systems without favor to its own satellites. Fair and square.

Online ZachS09

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And I thought it was unlikely for Falcon 9 to be an option when Amazon opted for Kuiper to launch on Atlas V, Vulcan, and New Glenn, to name a few.
Liftoff for St. Jude's! Go Dragon, Go Falcon, Godspeed Inspiration4!

Offline acsawdey

And I thought it was unlikely for Falcon 9 to be an option when Amazon opted for Kuiper to launch on Atlas V, Vulcan, and New Glenn, to name a few.

The problem of course, is that Atlas V is the only one of those 3 (and all the others contracted previously) that is flying and reliable. My question is, why bother with only 3 Falcon 9 launches? Or is that just to get the foot in the door, and they'll just do more if some of the other launchers don't show up and time gets short?

Offline wannamoonbase

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And I thought it was unlikely for Falcon 9 to be an option when Amazon opted for Kuiper to launch on Atlas V, Vulcan, and New Glenn, to name a few.

The problem of course, is that Atlas V is the only one of those 3 (and all the others contracted previously) that is flying and reliable. My question is, why bother with only 3 Falcon 9 launches? Or is that just to get the foot in the door, and they'll just do more if some of the other launchers don't show up and time gets short?

Exactly, Atlas V, with a limited number of RD-180's remaining is the only operaitonal vehicle.

If those vehicles lag in their operational ramp up, then maybe we see F9 get more launches before even the first flight takes place.

If Space is flying 144 times a year by 2025, there will be plenty of flights to be had.

F9 and FH wll be flying for years to come, a true revenue generator for SpaceX.
Wildly optimistic prediction, Superheavy recovery on IFT-4 or IFT-5

Offline marsbase

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And I thought it was unlikely for Falcon 9 to be an option when Amazon opted for Kuiper to launch on Atlas V, Vulcan, and New Glenn, to name a few.
It does sound a bit like Tesla offering to build GM cars in the Tesla factory.  But it may be that Elon expects and wants to become the monopoly heavy lift provider for the US.  And that will not be possible under anti-trust law if he leverages his rocket monopoly to gain share in the satellite business.

Offline mlindner

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And I thought it was unlikely for Falcon 9 to be an option when Amazon opted for Kuiper to launch on Atlas V, Vulcan, and New Glenn, to name a few.

My personal guess is that this "consolation prize" purchase of only a few launches likely has to do with the ongoing shareholder lawsuit directed at Amazon over the previous purchase of launches from several companies that hadn't yet launched their rockets while ignoring SpaceX. This purchase will probably be part of some future agreed-upon settlement with Amazon.
« Last Edit: 12/01/2023 09:04 pm by mlindner »
LEO is the ocean, not an island (let alone a continent). We create cruise liners to ride the oceans, not artificial islands in the middle of them. We need a physical place, which has physical resources, to make our future out there.

Offline mlindner

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And I thought it was unlikely for Falcon 9 to be an option when Amazon opted for Kuiper to launch on Atlas V, Vulcan, and New Glenn, to name a few.
It does sound a bit like Tesla offering to build GM cars in the Tesla factory.  But it may be that Elon expects and wants to become the monopoly heavy lift provider for the US.  And that will not be possible under anti-trust law if he leverages his rocket monopoly to gain share in the satellite business.

Elon's expressed multiple times, even as recently as just the other day in the very good video interview (a highly recommended watch!) with New York Times Deal Book that he wants Blue Origin to succeed and would prefer to have competitors to SpaceX and Tesla.
« Last Edit: 12/01/2023 09:14 pm by mlindner »
LEO is the ocean, not an island (let alone a continent). We create cruise liners to ride the oceans, not artificial islands in the middle of them. We need a physical place, which has physical resources, to make our future out there.

Online Zed_Noir

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<snip>
It does sound a bit like Tesla offering to build GM cars in the Tesla factory.  But it may be that Elon expects and wants to become the monopoly heavy lift provider for the US.  And that will not be possible under anti-trust law if he leverages his rocket monopoly to gain share in the satellite business.
Me think Elon and SpaceX is looking for more payloads for their upcoming excessive payload capacity. They will not turn down any payloads that is not on sanction lists.

Online DanClemmensen

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And I thought it was unlikely for Falcon 9 to be an option when Amazon opted for Kuiper to launch on Atlas V, Vulcan, and New Glenn, to name a few.
It does sound a bit like Tesla offering to build GM cars in the Tesla factory.  But it may be that Elon expects and wants to become the monopoly heavy lift provider for the US.  And that will not be possible under anti-trust law if he leverages his rocket monopoly to gain share in the satellite business.
No need for a deep strategic explanation. SpaceX is currently the heavy lift and medium-lift monopoly provider, and not because it was their plan. Their plan was to build rockets and sell launches at a profit, and they succeeded. Other companies planned the same, and have not yet succeeded. ULA has no LVs to sell. They already sold Kuiper their entire inventory:  the eight remaining un-allocated Atlas Vs. Kuiper needed to buy the launches so SpaceX sold them the launches. End of story.

SpaceX also currently has a de facto monopoly in the consumer satellite comms business. Suppressing the competition by nefarious means is attractive in the abstract, but I doubt it would make business sense even in the absence of governmental anti-monopoly intervention. Their rollout is currently constrained by manufacturing and distribution of terminals, infrastructure, and still to some extent by launches. They are not demand-limited, and this will not change for many years. Their main focus must then shift to competing with terrestrial connections.
« Last Edit: 12/01/2023 09:33 pm by DanClemmensen »

Offline abaddon

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What is that, like 60-100 or so Kuiper satellites?  Doesnít seem like much, so it does seem likely thereís more here than meets the eye.

Also, hell just froze over.  Not that itís really a surprise.

Offline alugobi

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