Author Topic: ULA Atlas V 551 - SILENTBARKER - Cape Canaveral SLC-41 - 2023  (Read 9224 times)

Offline woods170

  • IRAS fan
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 11483
  • IRAS fan
  • The Netherlands
  • Liked: 15616
  • Likes Given: 9804
Discussion thread for the Silent Barker mission

NSF Threads for Silent Barker : Discussion
NSF Articles for Silent Barker :

November 2023 on Atlas V from SLC-41

https://spacenews.com/air-force-awards-739-million-in-launch-contracts-to-ula-and-spacex/
Quote from: Sandra Erwin
The U.S. Air Force has divided $739 million in launch contracts between United Launch Alliance and SpaceX for six national security missions slated for 2021-2022. The contracts, awarded under the Evolved Expendable Launch Vehicle (EELV) program, were announced Tuesday evening by Air Force Space and Missile Systems Center.
ULA will receive $441.76 million under a fixed-price contract to launch SBIRS GEO-5, SBIRS GEO-6 and Silent Barker, a classified space situational awareness mission.

Earlier discussion on the contract in EELV Phase 1A-6 Thread
« Last Edit: 11/09/2022 04:30 pm by zubenelgenubi »

Offline vaporcobra

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2457
  • Tacoma, WA
  • Liked: 7642
  • Likes Given: 8748
Specific orbital requirements from the RFP (attachment 5).

Offline Newton_V

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 757
  • United States
  • Liked: 671
  • Likes Given: 118
Specific orbital requirements from the RFP (attachment 5).
Hopefully the dreadful -0.1 deg inclination can be avoided!

Offline zubenelgenubi

  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 8855
  • Arc to Arcturus, then Spike to Spica
  • Sometimes it feels like Trantor in the time of Hari Seldon
  • Liked: 5341
  • Likes Given: 47981
Very belated post re: make and model of LV; it's the Atlas V 551.
From SpaceX, ULA win military contracts, Air Force renames EELV program, dated March 7, 2019
Quote
The Air force has launched several small space situational awareness satellites in recent years to detect, track and inspect other spacecraft in geostationary orbit, where most large communications satellites are located. Gen. John Raymond, commander of Air Force Space Command, told lawmakers in 2017 the joint Silent Barker program is “designed to meet the DoD and intelligence community needs to enable space protection.”
Support your local planetarium! (COVID-panic and forward: Now more than ever.)
My current avatar is saying "i wants to go uppies!"

Offline zubenelgenubi

  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 8855
  • Arc to Arcturus, then Spike to Spica
  • Sometimes it feels like Trantor in the time of Hari Seldon
  • Liked: 5341
  • Likes Given: 47981
The NLT launch month, March 2022, derives from the contract award in February 2019.  Do we have any more recent information?

Edit Nov 26: Apparently, there is no more recent information.



Very belated cross-posts regarding the contract award; my bold:
United Launch Services, Centennial, Colorado, has been awarded a $441,761,778 firm-fixed-price contract, for launch services to deliver the SILENTBARKER, SBIRS GEO-5, and SBIRS GEO-6 missions to their intended orbits.  This launch service contract will include launch vehicle production, mission integration, mission launch operations/spaceflight worthiness, and mission unique activities for SILENTBARKER and SBIRS GEO-5, with an option for an additional SBIRS GEO-6 launch service.  The locations of performance are Centennial, Colorado; and Cape Canaveral, Florida. SILENTBARKER is expected to be completed by March 2022, SBIRS GEO-5 is expected to be completed by March 2021. This award is the result of a competitive acquisition and two offers were received. Fiscal 2018 and 2019 space procurement funds in the amount of $308,550,970 will be obligated at the time of award. The Contracting Division, Launch Systems Enterprise Directorate, Space and Missile Systems Center, Los Angeles Air Force Base, El Segundo, California, is the contracting activity (FA8811-19-C-0005).

Space Exploration Technologies Corp., Hawthorne, California, has been awarded a $297,000,000 firm-fixed-price contract, for launch services to deliver the NROL-87, NROL-85, and AFSPC-44 missions to their intended orbits.  This launch service contract will include launch vehicle production, mission integration, mission launch operations/spaceflight worthiness and mission unique activities for each mission. The locations of performance are Hawthorne, California; Cape Canaveral Air Force Space Station, Florida; and Vandenberg Air Force Base, California. NROL-85 and NROL-87 are expected to be completed by December 2021 and AFSPC-44 is expected to be completed by February 2021. This award is the result of a competitive acquisition and two offers were received. Fiscal 2018 and 2019 space procurement funds in the amount of $285,223,097 will be obligated at the time of award. The Contracting Division, Launch Systems Enterprise Directorate, Space and Missile Systems Center, Los Angeles Air Force Base, El Segundo, California, is the contracting activity (FA8811-19-C-0004).

SpaceX:
NROL-85 (LEO 63 Degree, by Dec 2021)
NROL-87 (SSO, by Dec 2021)
AFSPC-44 (Inclined GEO, by Feb 2021)

So that's 2 Falcon 9's from Vandenberg and a Falcon Heavy from KSC?

ULA:
SILENTBARKER (NROL-107) (GEO, March 2022)
SBIRS GEO-5 (GTO, March 2021)

http://spaceref.com/news/viewpr.html?pid=53706

Air Force awards $739 million launch service contracts
Press Release From: Los Angeles Air Force Base
Posted: Tuesday, February 19, 2019

The United States Air Force’s Space and Missile Systems Center (SMC), in partnership with the National Reconnaissance Office (NRO), awarded two Evolved Expendable Launch Vehicle (EELV) launch service contracts today.

 Space Exploration Technologies Corporation (SpaceX) has been awarded a $297 million firm-fixed-price contract, for launch services to deliver AFSPC-44, NROL-85, and NROL-87 to the intended orbit. United Launch Alliance (ULA) has been awarded a $441.76 million firm-fixed-price contract, for launch services to deliver SBIRS GEO-5, SBIRS GEO-6, and SILENTBARKER to the intended orbit.

 Both contracts provide the U.S. Government with a total launch solution for these missions, which includes launch vehicle production, mission integration, launch operations, and spaceflight certification. 

“The competitive award of these EELV launch service contracts directly supports SMC’s mission of delivering resilient and affordable space capabilities to our Nation while maintaining assured access to space” said Lt. Gen. John Thompson, SMC Commander, and Program Executive Officer for Space. “Phase 1A continues to enable the space enterprise to respond to the rapidly evolving operating environment.” 

This is the sixth competition under the current Phase 1A procurement strategy. These launch service contract awards strike a balance between meeting operational needs and lowering launch costs through reintroducing competition for National Security Space missions.

§  NROL-85 will launch in FY2021 from the Eastern Range.
§  NROL-87 will launch in FY2021 from the Western Range
§  SILENTBARKER will launch in FY2022 from the Eastern Range
§  SBIRS GEO-5 will launch in FY2021 from the Eastern Range
§  SBIRS GEO-6 is an option on the ULA contract with a possible launch in FY2022 from the Eastern Range
§  AFSPC-44 will launch in FY2021 from the Eastern Range

The Space and Missile Systems Center, located at Los Angeles Air Force Base in El Segundo, California, is Air Force Space Command's center of excellence for acquiring and developing military space systems. Its portfolio includes the Global Positioning System, military satellite communications, defense meteorological satellites, space launch and range systems, satellite control networks, space-based infrared systems, and space situational awareness capabilities.

ULA has confirmed that all three will launch on Atlas.

https://www.ulalaunch.com/about/news/2019/02/20/united-launch-alliance-wins-competitive-contract-award-to-launch-three-national-security-space-missions-for-the-department-of-defense

Quote
United Launch Alliance Wins Competitive Contract Award to Launch Three National Security Space Missions for the Department of Defense

Centennial, Colo., Feb. 19, 2019 – The United States Air Force announced today that United Launch Alliance (ULA) was awarded a firm, fixed-price contract to launch three missions on the company’s Atlas V rocket. This contract resulted from a competitive award under the Air Force’s Phase 1A procurement strategy.

“ULA is honored to be selected to launch three missions in this procurement block buy,” said Tory Bruno, ULA’s president and CEO. “ULA’s commercially developed Atlas V rocket has been a workhorse for national security, science and commercial missions since 2002, launching 79 missions with 100 percent mission success and builds on the heritage of more than 600 Atlas program launches.” 

The three missions include SILENTBARKER, Space-Based Infrared System Geosynchronous Earth Orbit (SBIRS GEO)-5 and SBIRS GEO-6. All will launch from Space Launch Complex-41 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida. SBIRS GEO-5 is expected to be the first mission to launch in March 2021.

“The Atlas V has delivered sensitive and essential missions including classified defense systems, planetary exploration spacecraft and key commercial assets with precise orbital accuracy,” said Bruno. “We draw on that experience as we transition to our next-generation Vulcan Centaur launch vehicle, designed to meet or exceed the needs of our Air Force customer so we can continue to provide reliable, on-time, assured access to space well into the future.”

With more than a century of combined heritage, United Launch Alliance is the world's most experienced and reliable launch service provider. ULA has successfully delivered 132 missions to orbit that provide Earth observation capabilities, enable global communications, unlock the mysteries of our solar system and support life-saving technology.
« Last Edit: 11/27/2021 12:02 am by zubenelgenubi »
Support your local planetarium! (COVID-panic and forward: Now more than ever.)
My current avatar is saying "i wants to go uppies!"

Offline zubenelgenubi

  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 8855
  • Arc to Arcturus, then Spike to Spica
  • Sometimes it feels like Trantor in the time of Hari Seldon
  • Liked: 5341
  • Likes Given: 47981
There is circumstantial evidence that SILENTBARKER is not launching in March 2022, or in the months immediately following.

December 14 update, SFN Launch Schedule, does not list this launch.  It does list a launch date or launch month for USSF-8, GOES-T, USSF-12, and Starliner OFT-2. That occupies SLC-41 through May, plus whatever Vulcan testing that may also be scheduled.

(Also, that would make the launch of SBIRS GEO-6 in H1 2022 be NET June 2022.)

I have edited the thread title launch time to TBD.
« Last Edit: 12/16/2021 03:59 am by zubenelgenubi »
Support your local planetarium! (COVID-panic and forward: Now more than ever.)
My current avatar is saying "i wants to go uppies!"

Offline Yiosie

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 435
  • Liked: 591
  • Likes Given: 72
The last paragraph in NSF's article on NROL-85 states that the next NRO launch will be for SILENTBARKER:

Falcon 9 launches NROL-85 mission for National Reconnaissance Office [dated Apr. 17]

Quote
Sunday’s mission was the second of four launches currently planned this year for the National Reconnaissance Office. The agency’s next two launches are planned for July and August: an Atlas V from Cape Canaveral with the NROL-107 SILENTBARKER mission and a Delta IV Heavy from Vandenberg with NROL-91.

Offline zubenelgenubi

  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 8855
  • Arc to Arcturus, then Spike to Spica
  • Sometimes it feels like Trantor in the time of Hari Seldon
  • Liked: 5341
  • Likes Given: 47981
Launch TBD 2022, NET late September?

Atlas V Eastern Range [SLC-41]:
June 29                          USSF-12
July 31                            SBIRS-GEO 6
(NET late) August         SES-20 & 21
(NET late) September  SILENTBARKER
« Last Edit: 06/14/2022 11:19 pm by zubenelgenubi »
Support your local planetarium! (COVID-panic and forward: Now more than ever.)
My current avatar is saying "i wants to go uppies!"

Offline zubenelgenubi

  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 8855
  • Arc to Arcturus, then Spike to Spica
  • Sometimes it feels like Trantor in the time of Hari Seldon
  • Liked: 5341
  • Likes Given: 47981
Atlas V / Vulcan Eastern Range [SLC-41]:
early? August      SBIRS GEO-6
Sept 15 to Oct 7  SES-20 & 21
SILENTBARKER?
December 8         CFT
December            Peregrine
Q4                         USSF-51
« Last Edit: 07/15/2022 08:35 pm by zubenelgenubi »
Support your local planetarium! (COVID-panic and forward: Now more than ever.)
My current avatar is saying "i wants to go uppies!"

Online Vahe231991

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 789
  • 11 Canyon Terrace
  • Liked: 195
  • Likes Given: 73
Given that the Delta IV Heavy is scheduled to loft the NROL-91 in early August, the question is whether there is sufficient time before the launch of the JPSS-2 satellite for the NROL-107 satellite to be launched in October, since the NROL-107 is the last launch of an NRO satellite atop the Atlas V.

Offline zubenelgenubi

  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 8855
  • Arc to Arcturus, then Spike to Spica
  • Sometimes it feels like Trantor in the time of Hari Seldon
  • Liked: 5341
  • Likes Given: 47981
Given that the Delta IV Heavy is scheduled to loft the NROL-91 in early August, the question is whether there is sufficient time before the launch of the JPSS-2 satellite for the NROL-107 satellite to be launched in October, since the NROL-107 is the last launch of an NRO satellite atop the Atlas V.
???

ULA, NRO, NASA, Space Force, and other contractors have sufficient staff to execute their respective, overlapping launch campaigns: Canaveral and Vandenberg, Atlas V and Delta IV Heavy.

If they don't, I suggest that they post their job openings on NSF!

I do, however, suspect that there will be a lot of people on work travel through the end of the year.

Given Newton_V's recent reply, an early August launch of NROL-91 would surprise me.  All he would say was "summer."

Edit: You seem to try to repeatedly establish dependencies (if X, then Y) that do not exist.
« Last Edit: 07/03/2022 03:02 am by zubenelgenubi »
Support your local planetarium! (COVID-panic and forward: Now more than ever.)
My current avatar is saying "i wants to go uppies!"

Offline Jim

  • Night Gator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 36193
  • Cape Canaveral Spaceport
  • Liked: 18754
  • Likes Given: 400
Given that the Delta IV Heavy is scheduled to loft the NROL-91 in early August, the question is whether there is sufficient time before the launch of the JPSS-2 satellite for the NROL-107 satellite to be launched in October, since the NROL-107 is the last launch of an NRO satellite atop the Atlas V.


why?  NROL-91 and NROL-107 are independent of each other. 

Online Vahe231991

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 789
  • 11 Canyon Terrace
  • Liked: 195
  • Likes Given: 73
Given that the Delta IV Heavy is scheduled to loft the NROL-91 in early August, the question is whether there is sufficient time before the launch of the JPSS-2 satellite for the NROL-107 satellite to be launched in October, since the NROL-107 is the last launch of an NRO satellite atop the Atlas V.


why?  NROL-91 and NROL-107 are independent of each other.
The ULA announced a launch window for the SES-20 and SES-21 from September 7 to October 7, so I wanted to clarify that when a launch date will be set for the NROL-107 during the remainder of 2022 isn't related to the upcoming launch of the NROL-91, since the two remaining launches of the Delta IV Heavy will carry NRO satellites after the NROL-91 is launched.

Offline Jim

  • Night Gator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 36193
  • Cape Canaveral Spaceport
  • Liked: 18754
  • Likes Given: 400
Given that the Delta IV Heavy is scheduled to loft the NROL-91 in early August, the question is whether there is sufficient time before the launch of the JPSS-2 satellite for the NROL-107 satellite to be launched in October, since the NROL-107 is the last launch of an NRO satellite atop the Atlas V.


why?  NROL-91 and NROL-107 are independent of each other.
The ULA announced a launch window for the SES-20 and SES-21 from September 7 to October 7, so I wanted to clarify that when a launch date will be set for the NROL-107 during the remainder of 2022 isn't related to the upcoming launch of the NROL-91, since the two remaining launches of the Delta IV Heavy will carry NRO satellites after the NROL-91 is launched.

????  How does future east coast Delta IVs matter in this.
How does JPSS affect NROL-107 since they are on different coasts?
Same goes for NROL-91 and 107.

Online Vahe231991

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 789
  • 11 Canyon Terrace
  • Liked: 195
  • Likes Given: 73
Given that the Delta IV Heavy is scheduled to loft the NROL-91 in early August, the question is whether there is sufficient time before the launch of the JPSS-2 satellite for the NROL-107 satellite to be launched in October, since the NROL-107 is the last launch of an NRO satellite atop the Atlas V.


why?  NROL-91 and NROL-107 are independent of each other.
The ULA announced a launch window for the SES-20 and SES-21 from September 7 to October 7, so I wanted to clarify that when a launch date will be set for the NROL-107 during the remainder of 2022 isn't related to the upcoming launch of the NROL-91, since the two remaining launches of the Delta IV Heavy will carry NRO satellites after the NROL-91 is launched.

????  How does future east coast Delta IVs matter in this.
How does JPSS affect NROL-107 since they are on different coasts?
Same goes for NROL-91 and 107.
If the NROL-91 launches next month, then the upcoming JPSS launch won't directly affect efforts to finalize a date for launch of the NROL-107 because the JPSS and NROL-107 launches are to be conducted from Vandenberg SFB and SLC-41 on the west and east coasts respectively. If the NRO faces a tight budget for FY 2023, then it might launch the NROL-107 in fourth quarter of this year.

Offline Jim

  • Night Gator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 36193
  • Cape Canaveral Spaceport
  • Liked: 18754
  • Likes Given: 400

If the NROL-91 launches next month, then the upcoming JPSS launch won't directly affect efforts to finalize a date for launch of the NROL-107 because the JPSS and NROL-107 launches are to be conducted from Vandenberg SFB and SLC-41 on the west and east coasts respectively. If the NRO faces a tight budget for FY 2023, then it might launch the NROL-107 in fourth quarter of this year.

Wrong.

NROL-91 has no real bearing on JPSS or NROL-107 launch dates.    JPSS and NROL-107 have some effect on each other due to shared ULA personnel.

Budget has no effect on near term launch dates. 

Online Vahe231991

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 789
  • 11 Canyon Terrace
  • Liked: 195
  • Likes Given: 73

If the NROL-91 launches next month, then the upcoming JPSS launch won't directly affect efforts to finalize a date for launch of the NROL-107 because the JPSS and NROL-107 launches are to be conducted from Vandenberg SFB and SLC-41 on the west and east coasts respectively. If the NRO faces a tight budget for FY 2023, then it might launch the NROL-107 in fourth quarter of this year.

Wrong.

NROL-91 has no real bearing on JPSS or NROL-107 launch dates.    JPSS and NROL-107 have some effect on each other due to shared ULA personnel.

Budget has no effect on near term launch dates.
I wanted to emphasize that neither the ULA nor the NRO have set an exact date for the launch of NROL-107 in the final quarter of 2022.

Offline sdsds

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 6626
  • “With peace and hope for all mankind.”
  • Seattle
  • Liked: 1582
  • Likes Given: 1503
Specific orbital requirements from the RFP (attachment 5).
Hopefully the dreadful -0.1 deg inclination can be avoided!

Atlas V and Centaur guidance routinely do markedly better than this, don't they?
« Last Edit: 07/24/2022 07:34 pm by sdsds »
— 𝐬𝐝𝐒𝐝𝐬 —

Offline russianhalo117

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 8254
  • Liked: 4094
  • Likes Given: 756

If the NROL-91 launches next month, then the upcoming JPSS launch won't directly affect efforts to finalize a date for launch of the NROL-107 because the JPSS and NROL-107 launches are to be conducted from Vandenberg SFB and SLC-41 on the west and east coasts respectively. If the NRO faces a tight budget for FY 2023, then it might launch the NROL-107 in fourth quarter of this year.

Wrong.

NROL-91 has no real bearing on JPSS or NROL-107 launch dates.    JPSS and NROL-107 have some effect on each other due to shared ULA personnel.

Budget has no effect on near term launch dates.
I wanted to emphasize that neither the ULA nor the NRO have set an exact date for the launch of NROL-107 in the final quarter of 2022.
To correct you a bit: neither the ULA nor the NRO have set an exact public target date which is approved for public release for the launch of NROL-107 in the final quarter of 2022.

Offline Jim

  • Night Gator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 36193
  • Cape Canaveral Spaceport
  • Liked: 18754
  • Likes Given: 400

If the NROL-91 launches next month, then the upcoming JPSS launch won't directly affect efforts to finalize a date for launch of the NROL-107 because the JPSS and NROL-107 launches are to be conducted from Vandenberg SFB and SLC-41 on the west and east coasts respectively. If the NRO faces a tight budget for FY 2023, then it might launch the NROL-107 in fourth quarter of this year.

Wrong.

NROL-91 has no real bearing on JPSS or NROL-107 launch dates.    JPSS and NROL-107 have some effect on each other due to shared ULA personnel.

Budget has no effect on near term launch dates.
I wanted to emphasize that neither the ULA nor the NRO have set an exact date for the launch of NROL-107 in the final quarter of 2022.

You just don't know the date.  They have internal dates that they work to.  Regardless, your emphasis doesn't correct or add anything to your previous statement.
« Last Edit: 07/25/2022 02:08 pm by Jim »

 

Advertisement NovaTech
Advertisement SkyTale Software GmbH
Advertisement Northrop Grumman
Advertisement
Advertisement Brady Kenniston
Advertisement NextSpaceflight
Advertisement Nathan Barker Photography
1