Author Topic: Titan II SLV  (Read 6140 times)

Offline scotty125

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Titan II SLV
« on: 04/12/2009 11:58 pm »
I took inspiration from Ed's Atlas thread, and decided to start something similar for the Titan.  I spend my Saturdays volunteering at the Evergreen Aviation & Space Museum just south of Portland Oregon.  The aviation side will be celebrating their 8th anniversary this year, and their star attraction is the "Spruce Goose."  The space side where I work is a much younger operation, but our featured exhibit is what I believe is the sole remaining copy of the Titan II SLV (Vehicle 10.)  We have it displayed upright on its launch stand with a recreation of the launch control facility (complete with original consoles) near the base.  The exhibit features a launch simulation of NOAA-M from 2002 with the final five minutes of the countdown and first 2 minutes of flight.

I've attached several photographs of the missile and launch facility, along with the second stage engine and some of the test hardware, and even a shot of the first stage of our Titan IV core vehicle.  I'd love to hear from any of the members who had experience with this beast, and might be willing to share some recollections or photos of the Titan or SLC4W.  Not having actually been "in the business" I'd love have some first-hand observations of the vehicle and operations.

Thanx!
"He who will not, when he may, when he should, he shall have nay."
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Offline edkyle99

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Re: Titan II SLV
« Reply #1 on: 04/13/2009 03:48 am »
Fantastic to see the 23G-10 preserved.  According to Stumpf's "Titan II", 23G-10 was composed of parts from *four* Titan 2 missiles, as follows.  Stage 1:  B-108 fuel tank, B-80 oxidizer tank.  Stage 2:  parts from B-108, B-67, and B-89.

Which Titan 4 stage is on display?  Will it ever be displayed with its second stage?

Here are some of my Titan 2 photos. 

Titan 2 missile B-2 was displayed in Huntsville at USSRC in 2002.  When I revisited in 2005, B-2 had been shunted off into a storage yard and was no longer on display.  My recollection was that B-2 was used as a training missile.

Titan 2 missile B-5 has been terrifically restored and is on display at the U.S. Air Force Museum in Dayton, OH.

Of course the Titan Missile Museum has Titan 2 missile N-10 in its silo.  A must-see for anyone interested in ICBM history.

And, finally, the infamous "Titan 2" once displayed at the KSC Visitors Center as a Gemini Titan.  It actually consisted of two Titan first stages stacked atop on another.  This Titan was removed in 2006.  I'm not sure of its current status.

A decade ago, I photographed a Titan 2 then displayed horizontally at the Atomic Museum at Kirtland AFB in New Mexico.  I can't seem to find the images right now, but I'll keep looking.  I think this has just recently become accessible to the public again.   

I haven't seen the Gemini Titan 2 displayed at the New York Hall of Science or the Titan 2 missile displayed at the Stafford Museum in Oklahoma.  I would like to know the missile number of the latter Titan.

 - Ed Kyle
« Last Edit: 04/13/2009 04:41 am by edkyle99 »

Offline scotty125

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Re: Titan II SLV
« Reply #2 on: 04/13/2009 04:43 am »
Ed:

Actually, we have the second stage on display as well.  We also have 1 of the solids, which is currently in our restoration shop, though I'm told there is some reluctance to put that on the floor.  I have included nameplate info for stage 1, as well as some other miscellaneous titan hardware...enjoy!  I also added a pic of our Atlas sustainer engine to that thread...
"He who will not, when he may, when he should, he shall have nay."
TV Commercial - Gulf Oil during Apollo Landings

Offline InThrustWeTrust

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Re: Titan II SLV
« Reply #3 on: 10/09/2022 04:43 am »
Scotty,

I was the 6595th Aerospace Test Group AF Launch Controller for the 23G-11 Clementine Launch.

I was just randomly searching something T-II related and your post popped up.

This is a launch mount shot of G-11 about 1 sec into flight and a happy snap of the Clementine spacecraft during spin balance after it arrived at Vandyland.

The Launch Control Center didn't look anything like the set up you have the photo above, but the sea foam green of the consoles was spot on. Ugliest color known to mankind.

Glad to see someone as excited about the Titan II as I am (at least 13 years ago).

Cheers,

ITWT

Offline copernicus

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Re: Titan II SLV
« Reply #4 on: 10/09/2022 10:20 pm »
That is a great photo of Clementine.  Launch prep photos of it are difficult to find.
  Do you have any photos of Clementine being stacked on its Titan 2 rocket?  Also, any photos of Landsat 6, and its Star-37 kick stage, being stacked for its Titan 2 launch?  Any photos of one of the NOAA satellites, and its Star-37 kick stage?

Offline Proponent

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Re: Titan II SLV
« Reply #5 on: 10/10/2022 12:59 am »
InThrustWeTrust: best forum name ever!

Offline libra

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Re: Titan II SLV
« Reply #6 on: 10/10/2022 12:03 pm »
Reminds of that book by Maxwell W. Hunter "Thrust into space" https://books.google.fr/books/about/Thrust_Into_Space.html?id=cQNDAAAAIAAJ&redir_esc=y

Offline Citabria

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Re: Titan II SLV
« Reply #7 on: 10/10/2022 02:20 pm »
Titan II at NMoUSAF in 2018:

Offline Citabria

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Re: Titan II SLV
« Reply #8 on: 10/10/2022 02:21 pm »
Titan I at NMoUSAF in 2018:

Offline Citabria

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Re: Titan II SLV
« Reply #9 on: 10/10/2022 02:22 pm »
Titan IV at NMoUSAF in 2018:

Offline catdlr

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Re: Titan II SLV
« Reply #10 on: 03/17/2024 03:38 am »
Visiting the Last Titan II Nuclear Missile Silo

Quote
Mar 13, 2024  TITAN MISSILE MUSEUM
Just south of Tucson, Arizona in Green Valley is the last remaining missile silo for the Titan II missile, the largest nuclear ICBM ever deployed by the United States. There were once 54 of these silos around the country,  with the sole purpose of mutually assured destruction in the event the country was ever attacked by nuclear weapons.

Now, this silo and it's command bunker have been turned into the Titan II Missile Museum, and visitors can visit the once top secret command bunker and silo.

Because of arms treaties, the missile silo doors are locked in a state of being half open, to show any satellites passing overhead that the silo is not operational. The open silo gives us a rare chance to look inside, to see a place that could have helped bring about the end of the world as we know it.

This missile silo was in operation from 1963 to 1984, and visiting is like taking a step back in time. 

In this video we walk around the outside of the silo before taking a tour of the command bunker (including a rare look at the living quarters) and the missile silo.

The Titan II Missile Museum is located at 1580 W Duval Mine Rd, Green Valley, AZ 85614

https://youtube.com/watch?v=-i-h849-DeE

Quote
Aug 26, 2019  TUCSON
(ARIZONA HIGHWAYS TV) - They say the cold war is over, but Arizona is still holding on to at least one missile from America's nuclear arsenal. It's scary, and yet at the same time impressive. And you can see it inside the Titan Missile Museum in Sahuarita.

https://youtube.com/watch?v=1E3sFfnAUQs


Detailed "NERD" tour through a NUCLEAR ICBM missile base! (Includes a mock missile launch!)

Quote
Nov 25, 2022
Join me in this guided tour of a decommissioned Titan II nuclear ICBM missile silo and command centre in Tucson, Arizona!

https://youtube.com/watch?v=k4my24bGlEM
« Last Edit: 03/17/2024 03:47 am by catdlr »
It's Tony De La Rosa, ...I don't create this stuff, I just report it.

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