Author Topic: History of the Tiros weather satellite  (Read 7955 times)

Offline Blackstar

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History of the Tiros weather satellite
« on: 03/16/2009 10:25 pm »
Attached is a 100+ page history of the Tiros weather satellite written in 1964.  This contains details not covered in other sources concerning the very early von Braun-era proposal for a metsat.  It was called Janus.

Whereas von Braun is known for his rocket work, he understood the importance of payloads to place atop his rockets.

Offline Art LeBrun

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Re: History of the Tiros weather satellite
« Reply #1 on: 03/16/2009 11:41 pm »
Very clean copy. I am confused by the information on page 49 that the
3rd stage was spun up and separated and then coasted for 6.5 minutes
prior to ignition. I always thought the second stage was needed for attitude control and pitch down as the 3rd stage approached ignition altitude....a second stage attitude control failure doomed the first
Echo launch just 6 weeks later.
1958 launch vehicle highlights: Vanguard TV-4 and Atlas 12B

Offline Blackstar

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Re: History of the Tiros weather satellite
« Reply #2 on: 03/17/2009 12:27 am »
I have no answers to any of this.  I'm just pulling things out of my voluminous files that I think people will be interested in and scanning them.  Some of this stuff has been in my files for a decade or longer.

Tiros has never received the history that it deserves.  They had the 40th anniversary and NOAA didn't do anything to commemorate it.  I think that they should have commissioned a book-length history, or at least a monograph, by now.
« Last Edit: 03/17/2009 12:28 am by Blackstar »

Offline kevin-rf

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Re: History of the Tiros weather satellite
« Reply #3 on: 03/17/2009 02:10 am »
I have no answers to any of this.  I'm just pulling things out of my voluminous files that I think people will be interested in and scanning them. 

And taking away our free time and weekends by posting something we all want to read ;)

These posts should have there own section labeled Black2 ...
« Last Edit: 03/17/2009 02:11 am by kevin-rf »
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Offline Art LeBrun

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Re: History of the Tiros weather satellite
« Reply #4 on: 03/17/2009 02:23 am »
My only TIROS history until now was TIROS 1:

Final Report on the TIROS 1 Meteorological Satellite System
TR-131 1962 softbound 258 pages 7.75 x 10.25

I am very happy to be reading all Dwayne's reports.
1958 launch vehicle highlights: Vanguard TV-4 and Atlas 12B

Offline Blackstar

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Re: History of the Tiros weather satellite
« Reply #5 on: 10/29/2010 03:31 pm »
Here are a couple of short histories of the sensors aboard military DMSP weather satellites.  They date from 1989 and 1993.

Offline simonbp

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Re: History of the Tiros weather satellite
« Reply #6 on: 10/29/2010 07:31 pm »
Whereas von Braun is known for his rocket work, he understood the importance of payloads to place atop his rockets.

Indeed. :)

Quote
Though the original research on the television satellite concept was directed toward a meteorological mission, the idea that a TV-equipped satellite might also serve military reconnaissance purposes must have been a factor in von Braun's justification of it as an ABMA undertaking.

Offline Blackstar

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Re: History of the Tiros weather satellite
« Reply #7 on: 10/29/2010 07:35 pm »
Though the original research on the television satellite concept was directed toward a meteorological mission, the idea that a TV-equipped satellite might also serve military reconnaissance purposes must have been a factor in von Braun's justification of it as an ABMA undertaking.

Actually, you got that backwards.  Von Braun originally proposed a reconnaissance satellite.  When he was told that he couldn't do that, he decided on a weather satellite instead.

Offline Art LeBrun

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Re: History of the Tiros weather satellite
« Reply #8 on: 10/29/2010 07:47 pm »
The launch of TIROS 5 in June 1962 was the perfect way to start a beautiful summer morning at Cape Canaveral. Interestingly after 2 launches in 1960 there was only one TIROS flown in 1961. 1962 saw 3 TIROS go aloft.

Thankfully the ABMA project was transferred to NASA in April 1959 or we would have realized marginal Juno 1 (20 lb) and Juno II (85 lb) payloads.
« Last Edit: 10/29/2010 08:25 pm by Art LeBrun »
1958 launch vehicle highlights: Vanguard TV-4 and Atlas 12B

Offline Art LeBrun

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Re: History of the Tiros weather satellite
« Reply #9 on: 10/29/2010 08:29 pm »
Model of proposed Janus II meteorological satellite designed for Juno II launch by ABMA.
1958 launch vehicle highlights: Vanguard TV-4 and Atlas 12B

Offline Blackstar

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Re: History of the Tiros weather satellite
« Reply #10 on: 10/29/2010 08:37 pm »
The very early history of this program is murky.  There's just not a lot written, and most histories that mention Tiros, if they mention Janus at all, simply say that it was a WvB idea and have a sentence on it, and that's it.

I wrote an article for Spaceflight a few years ago and I managed to get some information from one of the first people who worked on Janus.  Unfortunately, he was a little suspicious and clammed up after I initially got some information from him.  It was very odd.

I wish that NOAA/NASA would sponsor a formal history of the development of the weather satellite.  Weather satellites and comsats have had the biggest civilian impact, and they just have not been treated with proper histories.

Offline simonbp

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Re: History of the Tiros weather satellite
« Reply #11 on: 10/29/2010 10:22 pm »
Actually, you got that backwards.  Von Braun originally proposed a reconnaissance satellite.  When he was told that he couldn't do that, he decided on a weather satellite instead.

That was a quote from the 1964 paper you posted, so it would have been their mistake/obfuscation.

Offline Blackstar

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Re: History of the Tiros weather satellite
« Reply #12 on: 10/29/2010 10:49 pm »
Okay.  The original Tiros history is somewhat limited.  They missed some stuff.

Offline catdlr

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Re: History of the Tiros weather satellite
« Reply #13 on: 04/02/2024 10:51 am »
https://twitter.com/NASAhistory/status/1774829081676153092

Quote
The first full-scale weather satellite, TIROS-1, launched from Cape Canaveral #OTD in 1960 and took the first TV image from space. For 78 days it sent cloud cover images back to Earth, proving the value of satellites for surveying global weather conditions https://go.nasa.gov/3TQIXTg
It's Tony De La Rosa, ...I don't create this stuff, I just report it.

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