Author Topic: Boeing's Starliner (CST-100) - Discussion Thread 6  (Read 373081 times)

Offline zubenelgenubi

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Re: Boeing's Starliner (CST-100) - Discussion Thread 6
« Reply #20 on: 05/19/2022 11:58 pm »
Member:
Where are all the happy comments?

Boeing and company are farther along to success now than ever on the previous flight.

Perhaps all of you are waiting for a successful rendezvous and docking.  That's fair.
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Offline kcrick

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Re: Boeing's Starliner (CST-100) - Discussion Thread 6
« Reply #21 on: 05/20/2022 12:06 am »

I watched the launch and am happy Starliner is in orbit!

Hopefully it will successfully dock to the ISS tomorrow.  :)

Offline DanClemmensen

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Re: Boeing's Starliner (CST-100) - Discussion Thread 6
« Reply #22 on: 05/20/2022 12:26 am »
Member:
Where are all the happy comments?

Boeing and company are farther along to success now than ever on the previous flight.

Perhaps all of you are waiting for a successful rendezvous and docking.  That's fair.
For me, I'm hoping this mission goes flawlessly, but I have an irrational fear that Boeing is cursed, so I did not want to say anything at all. We (the space community including armchair observers like me) really, really need a healthy space program that includes Starliner.

Offline Herb Schaltegger

Re: Boeing's Starliner (CST-100) - Discussion Thread 6
« Reply #23 on: 05/20/2022 12:35 am »
I watched the live coverage from NSF this evening. Glad things are apparently going much better than last time. I have an old friend at Boeing personally involved in this program, so I'm also happy for him. On a macro level, the US needs orbital crew transportation redundancy so the better this flight goes, the better for everyone who gives a damn about US spaceflight and the continued viability of the ISS program.
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Online Robotbeat

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Re: Boeing's Starliner (CST-100) - Discussion Thread 6
« Reply #24 on: 05/20/2022 01:05 am »
Glad to hear the launch went well so far! Good job, ULA, your job here is done.
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Offline StormtrooperJoe

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Re: Boeing's Starliner (CST-100) - Discussion Thread 6
« Reply #25 on: 05/20/2022 01:33 am »
Not off to a good start, apparently at least two thrusters failed during orbital insertion.

Offline Coastal Ron

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Re: Boeing's Starliner (CST-100) - Discussion Thread 6
« Reply #26 on: 05/20/2022 01:35 am »
Not off to a good start, apparently at least two thrusters failed during orbital insertion.

Source?
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Offline Robert_the_Doll

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Re: Boeing's Starliner (CST-100) - Discussion Thread 6
« Reply #28 on: 05/20/2022 01:40 am »
The post-launch press conference mentioned it. But otherwise everything is going very well and those thrusters are not necessary for the final docking maneuvers.

Offline Herb Schaltegger

Re: Boeing's Starliner (CST-100) - Discussion Thread 6
« Reply #29 on: 05/20/2022 02:00 am »
A lot of people forget, but one or two of the very earliest Dragon (1) flights had thruster issues. Didn’t hinder the mission for SpaceX and provided there aren’t more failures, it won’t hinder Starliner. Stuff happens. Systems are designed and built with redundancy and resilience.
« Last Edit: 05/20/2022 02:00 am by Herb Schaltegger »
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Offline ZachS09

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Re: Boeing's Starliner (CST-100) - Discussion Thread 6
« Reply #30 on: 05/20/2022 02:28 am »
I was very happy that Starliner made it into its planned orbit. Specifically after the OMAC burn ended.

However, I instantly became annoyed after seeing those recent comments on Twitter about Starliner being a cursed spacecraft and foreshadowing an OFT-3 mission.

How unrealistic that sounds.
« Last Edit: 05/20/2022 02:29 am by ZachS09 »
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Offline Vahe231991

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Re: Boeing's Starliner (CST-100) - Discussion Thread 6
« Reply #31 on: 05/20/2022 02:30 am »
Good to see the OFT-2 in orbit after months of delay. At least it overcame the issue that the first Starliner experienced with fuel burn when it began orbiting the Earth.

Offline Jeff Lerner

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Re: Boeing's Starliner (CST-100) - Discussion Thread 6
« Reply #32 on: 05/20/2022 02:31 am »
Are there onboard cameras ?..would like to see how Rosie is doing and what things look like post launch.

In any case, happy to see things progressing well, the few glitches not withstanding…as others have noted, ISS  really needs a redundant U.S. means of getting to and from Station

Re: Boeing's Starliner (CST-100) - Discussion Thread 6
« Reply #33 on: 05/20/2022 02:31 am »
So far so good; go Starliner.
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Offline deadman1204

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Re: Boeing's Starliner (CST-100) - Discussion Thread 6
« Reply #34 on: 05/20/2022 02:56 am »
While the broken thrusters are not needed for docking,  they ARE needed for deorbit.

Its only one more failure from astronauts not being able to return home (getting stuck in orbit)

Offline yg1968

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Re: Boeing's Starliner (CST-100) - Discussion Thread 6
« Reply #35 on: 05/20/2022 03:08 am »
Are there onboard cameras ?..would like to see how Rosie is doing and what things look like post launch.

In any case, happy to see things progressing well, the few glitches not withstanding…as others have noted, ISS  really needs a redundant U.S. means of getting to and from Station

It was mentioned in the press conferences prior to launch that there is no on-board camera system for this mission. There will be for CFT.
« Last Edit: 05/20/2022 03:18 am by yg1968 »

Offline yg1968

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Re: Boeing's Starliner (CST-100) - Discussion Thread 6
« Reply #36 on: 05/20/2022 03:11 am »
While the broken thrusters are not needed for docking,  they ARE needed for deorbit.

Its only one more failure from astronauts not being able to return home (getting stuck in orbit)

Steve Stich said that they are not essential for de-orbit since de-obit could also use the RCS thrusters, if necessary.

However, there are 2 or 3 maneuvers that use the OMAC thrusters prior to docking.
« Last Edit: 05/20/2022 03:17 am by yg1968 »

Offline Surfdaddy

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Re: Boeing's Starliner (CST-100) - Discussion Thread 6
« Reply #37 on: 05/20/2022 03:21 am »
I have a question and although it's likely more Atlas related, the Starliner/Atlas is a "system".

Does it not seem that this launch system is inefficient from a payload perspective? This of course is even ignoring non-reusability of the launcher.
1 - The solids remain attached for some time, as dead weight, after burnout
2 - The skirt is additional weight that is eventually jettisoned. And the "hard edge" of the rear of the skirt can't exactly be optimally aerodynamic (although this may be a pretty small factor).

Offline kdhilliard

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Re: Boeing's Starliner (CST-100) - Discussion Thread 6
« Reply #38 on: 05/20/2022 03:23 am »
Can someone here please detail how many of what sort of thrusters a Starliner has and where they are located?

Offline DanClemmensen

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Re: Boeing's Starliner (CST-100) - Discussion Thread 6
« Reply #39 on: 05/20/2022 03:34 am »
I have a question and although it's likely more Atlas related, the Starliner/Atlas is a "system".

Does it not seem that this launch system is inefficient from a payload perspective? This of course is even ignoring non-reusability of the launcher.
1 - The solids remain attached for some time, as dead weight, after burnout
2 - The skirt is additional weight that is eventually jettisoned. And the "hard edge" of the rear of the skirt can't exactly be optimally aerodynamic (although this may be a pretty small factor).
Atlas V was not designed specifically for Starliner. It was designed to accommodate a wide range of payloads and is has successfully launched 150 missions. It is efficient in that you only use the number of SRBs that you need, from zero to 5. Starliner only needs two.  Any flexible launch system will be less "efficient" than a co-designed launcher for a particular payload, but if you had to custom-design a launcher for each payload the cost would be even worse than it is today.

 

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