Author Topic: Launch statistics  (Read 22304 times)

Online laszlo

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Re: Launch statistics
« Reply #20 on: 08/15/2022 06:20 pm »
Similar argument was presented a few years ago, but:
1. Back then it was argued Chinese launch rate is high due to them completing their BeiDou constellation. Yet today they already completed it, but their launch rate is higher than ever.
2. Do we have any evidence that Chinese satellite's lifespan is shorter than the US? I don't think so.
3. As shown by megaconstellations, a somewhat shorter lifespan for satellite can be a feature instead of a bug, because it allows frequent refreshing of satellite hardware. Also longer lifespan means higher cost, those "billion dollar targets" as a US general puts it is not a good idea in the age of ASAT weapons.
4. Even if we accept that China's launch rate is due to them completing many things US already has (it's not), it still means China is catching up to US fast, while US is like a turtle that barely moves, not a good position to be.

So yes, in the end everybody's launch rate is to serve their national goals, the problem is US national goal in space would look pretty pathetic comparing to China, without the help from SpaceX.

No one said that Chinese satellites have shorter lifespans.

Starlink launches have nothing to do with US national goals in space.

Offline su27k

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Re: Launch statistics
« Reply #21 on: 01/01/2023 01:24 am »
Starlink launches have nothing to do with US national goals in space.

Sure they do, the very first goal listed in 2020 US national space policy is "Promote and incentivize private industry to facilitate the creation of new global and domestic markets for United States space goods and services, and strengthen and preserve the position of the United States as the global partner of choice for international space commerce.", that fits Starlink to a T. And Starlink's performance in Ukraine shows it not only matters for US space policy, it's important for US foreign and national security policy as well.

Offline su27k

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Re: Launch statistics
« Reply #22 on: 01/01/2023 01:27 am »
So in 2022 US is able to surpass China in number of launches, thanks again to SpaceX. And it was able to do this without counting on Rocket Lab launches from New Zealand.

Offline AmigaClone

Re: Launch statistics
« Reply #23 on: 07/04/2023 06:10 pm »
So in 2022 US is able to surpass China in number of launches, thanks again to SpaceX. And it was able to do this without counting on Rocket Lab launches from New Zealand.

In the first half of 2023, there were the same number of Successful launches from Cape Canaveral (25) as there were from China. China had 25 orbital launches while SpaceX had a total of 44 successful orbital launches using the Falcon 9/Falcon Heavy.

In the first half of 2023, Cape Canaveral, Vandenberg, Kennedy, and MARS saw a total of 47 successful launches. Admittedly, 22 of the Falcon 9 launches were Starlink launches.


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