Author Topic: Gemini 10  (Read 13561 times)

Offline Ronpur50

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Gemini 10
« on: 07/19/2016 01:04 am »
While we celebrate the Progress MS-03 docking and the SpaceX launch and landing this morning, take time to remember that 50 years ago today, Gemini 10 was launched from Cape Kennedy.  Share any memories you have of Young and Collins' flight.  It was the first time a spacecraft rendezvoused with two orbiting spacecraft.

Offline Rocket Science

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Re: Gemini 10
« Reply #1 on: 07/19/2016 01:30 am »
I remember watching this mission on our color TV (first one on the block) ;D with friends. The boost from Agena to the record highest orbit ever remained with me as well as the calls "Go Atlas, Go Agena"!! :)
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Offline the_other_Doug

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Re: Gemini 10
« Reply #2 on: 07/19/2016 02:26 am »
I do remember this flight well.  For one thing, this was the really fun one for the NBC toy trains.

For you youngsters, to demonstrate rendezvous, NBS went out and got a bunch of Lionel HO train sets.  They took the powered engines and replaced their locomotive bodies with models of Geminis and Agenas.

They then set up the model railroad tracks to correspond with the rendezvous paths between the various spacecraft.  Gemini X was really fun, because they had two Agena locomotives, and train tracks that went out to make this big loop for a few orbits.

This is no fooling, that's really what they did back then.

Of course, once Mike Collins wrote his superb Carrying the Fire, I developed a special fondness for Gemini X, as I felt I had been along for the ride...
-Doug  (With my shield, not yet upon it)

Offline deaville

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Re: Gemini 10
« Reply #3 on: 07/19/2016 06:43 am »
A great flight that was relatively trouble free. However, from this side of the pond there was some regret as the press widely reported that a British experiment was thrown out with the rubbish.
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Offline Aragatz

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Re: Gemini 10
« Reply #4 on: 07/19/2016 08:40 am »
The story of that space flight is that Michael Collins lost his camera during extravehicular activity ... ;)

Offline Ronpur50

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Re: Gemini 10
« Reply #5 on: 07/19/2016 01:36 pm »
I guess Collins liked to fly in July, because exactly 3 years later he would be on board Apollo 11!

Offline Rocket Science

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Re: Gemini 10
« Reply #6 on: 07/19/2016 03:28 pm »
I do remember this flight well.  For one thing, this was the really fun one for the NBC toy trains.

For you youngsters, to demonstrate rendezvous, NBS went out and got a bunch of Lionel HO train sets.  They took the powered engines and replaced their locomotive bodies with models of Geminis and Agenas.

They then set up the model railroad tracks to correspond with the rendezvous paths between the various spacecraft.  Gemini X was really fun, because they had two Agena locomotives, and train tracks that went out to make this big loop for a few orbits.

This is no fooling, that's really what they did back then.

Of course, once Mike Collins wrote his superb Carrying the Fire, I developed a special fondness for Gemini X, as I felt I had been along for the ride...
You know... Now that you reminded us, I remember the train thing! :)
"The laws of physics are unforgiving"
~Rob: Physics instructor, Aviator

Offline the_other_Doug

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Re: Gemini 10
« Reply #7 on: 07/19/2016 08:12 pm »
The story of that space flight is that Michael Collins lost his camera during extravehicular activity ... ;)

Actually, the real story of that space flight was that even a very small out-of-plane error in the navigation state of the booster can result in incredibly huge and wasteful propellant usage needed to abort a "whifferdill" approach, in which the active spacecraft (the Gemini), in a slightly different orbital plane from the target (Agena X), described an ever-tightening conic approach path.  Which required the usage of most of the propellant stored in the spacecraft to fix.

Losing the camera was a shame, and resulted in the loss of some pretty pictures.  But that didn't have any impact on the Gemini flight program, or the lessons learned that needed to be applied to Apollo planning, especially rendezvous planning...
-Doug  (With my shield, not yet upon it)

Offline mheney

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Re: Gemini 10
« Reply #8 on: 07/19/2016 09:09 pm »
I do remember this flight well.  For one thing, this was the really fun one for the NBC toy trains.

For you youngsters, to demonstrate rendezvous, NBS went out and got a bunch of Lionel HO train sets.  They took the powered engines and replaced their locomotive bodies with models of Geminis and Agenas.

They then set up the model railroad tracks to correspond with the rendezvous paths between the various spacecraft.  Gemini X was really fun, because they had two Agena locomotives, and train tracks that went out to make this big loop for a few orbits.

This is no fooling, that's really what they did back then.

Of course, once Mike Collins wrote his superb Carrying the Fire, I developed a special fondness for Gemini X, as I felt I had been along for the ride...

Old folks unite!!!  Yes, those trains were wonderful!!! 

Offline Rocket Science

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Re: Gemini 10
« Reply #9 on: 07/19/2016 10:28 pm »
Mission video:


"The laws of physics are unforgiving"
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Offline Ronpur50

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Re: Gemini 10
« Reply #10 on: 07/20/2016 01:43 am »
I do remember this flight well.  For one thing, this was the really fun one for the NBC toy trains.

For you youngsters, to demonstrate rendezvous, NBS went out and got a bunch of Lionel HO train sets.  They took the powered engines and replaced their locomotive bodies with models of Geminis and Agenas.

They then set up the model railroad tracks to correspond with the rendezvous paths between the various spacecraft.  Gemini X was really fun, because they had two Agena locomotives, and train tracks that went out to make this big loop for a few orbits.

This is no fooling, that's really what they did back then.

Of course, once Mike Collins wrote his superb Carrying the Fire, I developed a special fondness for Gemini X, as I felt I had been along for the ride...

Old folks unite!!!  Yes, those trains were wonderful!!!

I must be a bit too young, I don't remember them!

Offline Ronpur50

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Re: Gemini 10
« Reply #11 on: 07/20/2016 10:25 am »
I thought I would share a scan of this photo I received recently.  It is a double exposure of the Agena and Gemini launches for Gemini 10.

Offline MATTBLAK

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Re: Gemini 10
« Reply #12 on: 07/20/2016 11:13 am »
It was a terrific mission! Mike Collins' "Carrying The Fire" book vividly brings it to life.
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Offline TALsite

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Re: Gemini 10
« Reply #13 on: 07/20/2016 08:03 pm »
And not to forget that Collins was the first human being touching a flying spacecraft different to the one that put him in space.

I think NASA photographers loved the multiple exposures.  This is one of the most remembered Gemini images
http://spaceflight.nasa.gov/gallery/images/gemini/gemini10/html/s66-42762.html


Offline Ronpur50

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Re: Gemini 10
« Reply #14 on: 07/20/2016 09:05 pm »
And not to forget that Collins was the first human being touching a flying spacecraft different to the one that put him in space.

I think NASA photographers loved the multiple exposures.  This is one of the most remembered Gemini images
http://spaceflight.nasa.gov/gallery/images/gemini/gemini10/html/s66-42762.html

Oh, that one used to confuse me as a child, think the tower dropped down just as they launched!

Offline Proponent

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Re: Gemini 10
« Reply #15 on: 06/21/2018 01:57 pm »
Losing the camera was a shame, and resulted in the loss of some pretty pictures.

I believe there were multiple failures involved here.  I vaguely recall an interview with John Young in which he expressed his great frustration at not being able to capture Collins' spectacular space walking on film, because none of his n cameras, where n>>1, was working.

Offline Archibald

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Re: Gemini 10
« Reply #16 on: 06/21/2018 03:18 pm »
And not to forget that Collins was the first human being touching a flying spacecraft different to the one that put him in space.

I think NASA photographers loved the multiple exposures.  This is one of the most remembered Gemini images
http://spaceflight.nasa.gov/gallery/images/gemini/gemini10/html/s66-42762.html

Oh, that one used to confuse me as a child, think the tower dropped down just as they launched!

And when I was a child, with all the smoke and flames coming out of a rocket launch and masking the launch tower, I assumed the launch tower was destroyed, each launch, and rebuild, for the next launch. I was already a space nerd, but I was only six, so don't blame me too hard for the naivety :p
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Re: Gemini 10
« Reply #17 on: 12/01/2023 12:27 am »
....bump for an old video

Gemini 10 Full Mission - Audio, Footage, Narration, John Young, Michael Collins, EVA, Agena, Docking

Quote
Nov 30, 2023
Documentary about the Gemini X mission, entirely based on historical narration, mission audio and footage. The full mission is covered, showing training,  Agena launch, Titan launch, Agena rendezvous, EVA, reentry and recovery.

Gemini 10 (officially Gemini X) was a 1966 crewed spaceflight in NASA's Gemini program. It was the 8th crewed Gemini flight. During the mission, flown by future STS-1 Commander John Young and future Apollo 11 Command Module Pilot Michael Collins, Collins became the first person to perform two extravehicular activities.
Gemini 10 was designed to achieve rendezvous and docking with an Agena Target Vehicle (ATV), and EVA. It was also planned to dock with the ATV from the Gemini 8 mission. It would be also the first mission to fire the Agena's own rocket, allowing them to reach higher orbits.

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