Author Topic: Delta II - ICESat-2 - September 15, 2018  (Read 77900 times)

Online Rondaz

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Re: Delta II - ICESat-2 - September 15, 2018
« Reply #60 on: 08/08/2018 01:59 am »
NASA Invites Media to View Launch of ICESat-2 from West Coast

Media accreditation is open for the launch of NASA’s Ice, Cloud and land Elevation Satellite-2, or ICESat-2, scheduled for Saturday, Sept. 15, with a 40-minute window opening at 8:46 a.m. EDT (5:46 a.m. PDT). ICESat-2 will provide precise measurements of the changing height of Earth’s glaciers, ice sheets and sea ice.

The spacecraft will lift off from Space Launch Complex 2 at Vandenberg Air Force Base in California on the final launch of a United Launch Alliance Delta II rocket.

Media interested in attending prelaunch and launch activities must submit an accreditation request online at https://media.ksc.nasa.gov/.

International media without U.S. citizenship must apply by 12 p.m. EDT Monday, Aug. 13. U.S. media must apply by 12 p.m. EDT Tuesday, Aug. 28. For questions about accreditation, please email [email protected]

For questions about the launch, contact the NASA Kennedy Space Center newsroom in Florida at 321-867-2468. Launch date schedule updates will be posted at https://www.nasa.gov/launchschedule/.

ICESat-2 will measure the height of our changing Earth, one laser pulse at a time, 10,000 laser pulses per second. The satellite will carry a single instrument, the Advanced Topographic Laser Altimeter System (ATLAS), which measures the travel times of laser pulses to calculate the distance between the spacecraft and Earth’s surface. ICESat-2 will provide scientists with height measurements that create a global portrait of Earth’s third dimension, gathering data that can precisely track changes of terrain including glaciers, sea ice, forests and more.

NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland, manages development of the ICESat-2 mission, including mission systems engineering and mission operations on behalf of the agency’s Earth Science Division. Goddard also built and tested the ATLAS instrument. The ICESat-2 spacecraft was built and tested by Northrop Grumman in Gilbert, Arizona. United Launch Alliance of Centennial, Colorado, is providing the Delta II launch service. NASA’s Launch Services Program, based at Kennedy, is responsible for launch service acquisition, integration, analysis and launch management.

Offline rcaron

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Re: Delta II - ICESat-2 - September 15, 2018
« Reply #61 on: 08/08/2018 08:53 pm »
Does anyone know how long they have the range for? When does their window close (a week? a month?)
Thank you Delta II & ICESat-2!

Offline Jim

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Re: Delta II - ICESat-2 - September 15, 2018
« Reply #62 on: 08/09/2018 03:17 pm »
Does anyone know how long they have the range for? When does their window close (a week? a month?)

It is going into LEO.  There are no launch periods for LEO launches.

Offline rcaron

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Re: Delta II - ICESat-2 - September 15, 2018
« Reply #63 on: 08/09/2018 11:59 pm »
I was thinking more along the lines of range constraints, and particularly whether the Delta IV-Heavy launch of NROL-71 on 9/26 pulls the ULA crew away. I know it is usually "first come, first serve" but wasn't sure if the NRO takes priority.
Thank you Delta II & ICESat-2!

Offline Newton_V

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Re: Delta II - ICESat-2 - September 15, 2018
« Reply #64 on: 08/11/2018 06:44 pm »
I was thinking more along the lines of range constraints, and particularly whether the Delta IV-Heavy launch of NROL-71 on 9/26 pulls the ULA crew away. I know it is usually "first come, first serve" but wasn't sure if the NRO takes priority.
ICESat-2 is going before L-71.  (Assuming something doesn't go "horribly wrong")

Offline Helodriver

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Re: Delta II - ICESat-2 - September 15, 2018
« Reply #65 on: 08/17/2018 04:45 am »
Under gray Marine Layer leaden coastal skies, the final Delta II underwent a tanking test this week, loading LOX while under the protection of the SLC-2W Mobile Service Tower. Chilled vapor vents from the vehicle and condensed along the core stage before pooling in the flame trench.

During the actual launch countdown, the MST will be rolled back for propellant loading.

Offline zubenelgenubi

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Re: Delta II - ICESat-2 - September 15, 2018
« Reply #66 on: 08/17/2018 06:09 pm »
Is this flight officially Delta-381?
« Last Edit: 08/17/2018 06:10 pm by zubenelgenubi »
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Offline russianhalo117

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Re: Delta II - ICESat-2 - September 15, 2018
« Reply #67 on: 08/17/2018 06:11 pm »
Is this flight officially Delta 381?
Currently yes unless the neighboring DIVH flies before it.

Offline dsmillman

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Re: Delta II - ICESat-2 - September 15, 2018
« Reply #68 on: 08/17/2018 07:34 pm »
August 17, 2018
MEDIA ADVISORY M18-122
NASA to Host Media Briefing on New Ice-Monitoring Mission
 
NASA will host a media teleconference at 1 p.m. EDT Wednesday, Aug. 22, to discuss the upcoming launch of the Ice, Cloud and land Elevation Satellite (ICESat-2), which will fly NASA’s most advanced laser altimeter to measure Earth’s changing ice. The teleconference will stream live on NASA’s website.

ICESat-2 is scheduled to launch Sept. 15 on a mission to provide critical, precision measurements of Earth’s ice sheets, glaciers and sea ice, which will help scientists better understand how changes at the poles will affect people around the world.

The briefing participants are:

•   Tom Wagner, cryosphere program scientist in the Science Mission Directorate (SMD) at NASA Headquarters
•   Richard Slonaker, ICESat-2 program executive in SMD
•   Doug McLennan, ICESat-2 project manager at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center
•   Donya Douglas-Bradshaw, Advanced Topographic Laser Altimeter System (ATLAS) instrument manager at Goddard
•   Tom Neumann, ICESat-2 deputy project scientist at Goddard

At the time of the briefing, associated graphics will be available online at:

http://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/13044

Media who would like to ask questions by phone must send an email with their name and affiliation to Steve Cole at [email protected] by 10 a.m. Aug. 22. Questions also can be submitted during the teleconference via Twitter using the hashtag #askNASA.

The teleconference will be followed at 2:30 p.m. by a live, televised discussion with social media followers and mission experts at Goddard, which manages the ICESat-2 mission for SMD. It will be carried on NASA Television, the agency’s website and NASA’s Facebook Live, Periscope, Twitter, Twitch, YouTube, and UStream channels. Members of the public can ask questions with the hashtag #askNASA on Twitter or in the comment section of the NASA Ice Facebook page.

ICESat-2 will launch from Vandenberg Air Force Base in California aboard United Launch Alliance’s final Delta II rocket. For more information on the mission, visit:

https://nasa.gov/icesat-2

For more information about NASA’s Earth science activities, visit:

https://www.nasa.gov/earth
« Last Edit: 08/20/2018 06:28 am by jacqmans »

Offline Targeteer

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Re: Delta II - ICESat-2 - September 15, 2018
« Reply #69 on: 08/23/2018 04:13 am »
August 22, 2018
RELEASE 18-074
NASA Launching Advanced Laser to Measure Earth’s Changing Ice


Next month, NASA will launch into space the most advanced laser instrument of its kind, beginning a mission to measure – in unprecedented detail – changes in the heights of Earth’s polar ice.

NASA’s Ice, Cloud and land Elevation Satellite-2 (ICESat-2) will measure the average annual elevation change of land ice covering Greenland and Antarctica to within the width of a pencil, capturing 60,000 measurements every second. 

“The new observational technologies of ICESat-2 – a top recommendation of the scientific community in NASA’s first Earth science decadal survey – will advance our knowledge of how the ice sheets of Greenland and Antarctica contribute to sea level rise,” said Michael Freilich, director of the Earth Science Division in NASA’s Science Mission Directorate.

ICESat-2 will extend and improve upon NASA's 15-year record of monitoring the change in polar ice heights, which started in 2003 with the first ICESat mission and continued in 2009 with NASA’s Operation IceBridge, an airborne research campaign that kept track of the accelerating rate of change.

A Technological Leap

ICESat-2 represents a major technological leap in our ability to measure changes in ice height. Its Advanced Topographic Laser Altimeter System (ATLAS) measures height by timing how long it takes individual light photons to travel from the spacecraft to Earth and back.

“ATLAS required us to develop new technologies to get the measurements needed by scientists to advance the research,” said Doug McLennan, ICESat-2 project manager at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center. “That meant we had to engineer a satellite instrument that not only will collect incredibly precise data, but also will collect more than 250 times as many height measurements as its predecessor.”

ATLAS will fire 10,000 times each second, sending hundreds of trillions of photons to the ground in six beams of green light. The roundtrip of individual laser photons from ICESat-2 to Earth’s surface and back is timed to the billionth of a second to precisely measure elevation.

With so many photons returning from multiple beams, ICESat-2 will get a much more detailed view of the ice surface than its predecessor, ICESat. In fact, if the two satellites were flown over a football field, ICESat would take only two measurements – one in each end zone – whereas ICESat-2 would collect 130 measurements between each end zone.

As it circles Earth from pole to pole, ICESat-2 will measure ice heights along the same path in the polar regions four times a year, providing seasonal and annual monitoring of ice elevation changes.

NASA’s Ice, Cloud and land Elevation Satellite-2 (ICESat-2) will provide scientists with height measurements that create a global portrait of Earth's third dimension, gathering data that can precisely track changes of terrain including glaciers, sea ice, and forests.
Credits: NASA/Ryan Fitzgibbons
Watch this video on YouTube.

Tracking Ice Melt

Hundreds of billions of tons of land ice melt or flow into the oceans annually, contributing to sea level rise worldwide. In recent years, contributions of melt from the ice sheets of Greenland and Antarctica alone have raised global sea level by more than a millimeter a year, accounting for approximately one-third of observed sea level rise, and the rate is increasing.

ICESat-2 data documenting the ongoing height change of ice sheets will help researchers narrow the range of uncertainty in forecasts of future sea level rise and connect those changes to climate drivers.

ICESat-2 also will make the most precise polar-wide measurements to date of sea ice freeboard, which is the height of sea ice above the adjacent sea surface. This measurement is used to determine the thickness and volume of sea ice. Satellites routinely measure the area covered by sea ice and have observed an Arctic sea ice area decline of about 40 percent since 1980, but precise, region-wide sea ice thickness measurements will improve our understanding of the drivers of sea ice retreat and loss.

Although floating sea ice doesn’t change sea level when it melts, its loss has different consequences. The bright Arctic ice cap reflects the Sun’s heat back into space. When that ice melts away, the dark water below absorbs that heat. This alters wind and ocean circulation patterns, potentially affecting Earth’s global weather and climate.

Beyond the poles, ICESat-2 will measure the height of ocean and land surfaces, including forests. ATLAS is designed to measure both the tops of trees and the ground below, which – combined with existing datasets on forest extent – will help researchers estimate the amount of carbon stored in the world’s forests. Researchers also will investigate the height data collected on ocean waves, reservoir levels, and urban areas.

Potential data users have been working with ICESat-2 scientists to connect the mission science to societal needs. For example, ICESat-2 measurements of snow and river heights could help local governments plan for floods and droughts. Forest height maps, showing tree density and structure, could improve computer models that firefighters use to forecast wildfire behavior. Sea ice thickness measurements could be integrated into forecasts the U.S. Navy issues for navigation and sea ice conditions.

“Because ICESat-2 will provide measurements of unprecedented precision with global coverage, it will yield not only new insight into the polar regions, but also unanticipated findings across the globe,” said Thorsten Markus, an ICESat-2 project scientist at Goddard. “The capacity and opportunity for true exploration is immense.”

​ICESat-2 is scheduled to launch Sept. 15 from Vandenberg Air Force Base in California. For more information about the mission, visit:

https://nasa.gov/icesat-2

For more information about NASA’s Earth science activities, visit:

https://www.nasa.gov/earth

-end-
« Last Edit: 08/23/2018 04:14 am by Targeteer »
Best quote heard during an inspection, "I was unaware that I was the only one who was aware."

Offline VDD1991

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Re: Delta II - ICESat-2 - September 15, 2018
« Reply #70 on: 09/04/2018 02:24 am »
I know all you are aware of the upcoming ICESat-2 launch, but when the ICESat-2 satellite is launched into orbit, the retirement of the Delta II will mark the retirement of the Thor family for good, because the Delta II is based off of an American Cold War IRBM and the Delta IV doesn't share the design heritage of the Thor IRBM or Delta II. The fast-approaching retirement of the Delta II will leave the Minotaur rockets the only SLVs in active service to be based on a Cold War ICBM.

Offline TripleSeven

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Re: Delta II - ICESat-2 - September 15, 2018
« Reply #71 on: 09/04/2018 02:50 am »
I know all you are aware of the upcoming ICESat-2 launch, but when the ICESat-2 satellite is launched into orbit, the retirement of the Delta II will mark the retirement of the Thor family for good, because the Delta II is based off of an American Cold War IRBM and the Delta IV doesn't share the design heritage of the Thor IRBM or Delta II. The fast-approaching retirement of the Delta II will leave the Minotaur rockets the only SLVs in active service to be based on a Cold War ICBM.

PGM17...long live Thor...

Offline woods170

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Re: Delta II - ICESat-2 - September 15, 2018
« Reply #72 on: 09/04/2018 07:19 am »
I know all you are aware of the upcoming ICESat-2 launch, but when the ICESat-2 satellite is launched into orbit, the retirement of the Delta II will mark the retirement of the Thor family for good, because the Delta II is based off of an American Cold War IRBM and the Delta IV doesn't share the design heritage of the Thor IRBM or Delta II. The fast-approaching retirement of the Delta II will leave the Minotaur rockets the only SLVs in active service to be based on a Cold War ICBM.

Good. Its about time they got rid of those 5+ decades old designs. They suffer from parts obsolescence and part availability issues, are being out-performed by newer designs and are generally more expensive than their present-day counterparts.
Had Challenger never happened the Thor familiy of launch vehicles would have ceased to exist nearly 3 decades ago.
« Last Edit: 09/04/2018 12:01 pm by woods170 »

Offline ZachS09

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Re: Delta II - ICESat-2 - September 15, 2018
« Reply #73 on: 09/04/2018 02:10 pm »
I know all you are aware of the upcoming ICESat-2 launch, but when the ICESat-2 satellite is launched into orbit, the retirement of the Delta II will mark the retirement of the Thor family for good, because the Delta II is based off of an American Cold War IRBM and the Delta IV doesn't share the design heritage of the Thor IRBM or Delta II. The fast-approaching retirement of the Delta II will leave the Minotaur rockets the only SLVs in active service to be based on a Cold War ICBM.

Good. Its about time they got rid of those 5+ decades old designs. They suffer from parts obsolescence and part availability issues, are being out-performed by newer designs and are generally more expensive than their present-day counterparts.
Had Challenger never happened the Thor familiy of launch vehicles would have ceased to exist nearly 3 decades ago.

But isn't it good to know that the Thor-based Delta rockets have been such reliable launchers?
Liftoff for St. Jude's! Go Dragon, Go Falcon, Godspeed Inspiration4!

Offline envy887

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Re: Delta II - ICESat-2 - September 15, 2018
« Reply #74 on: 09/04/2018 02:25 pm »
I know all you are aware of the upcoming ICESat-2 launch, but when the ICESat-2 satellite is launched into orbit, the retirement of the Delta II will mark the retirement of the Thor family for good, because the Delta II is based off of an American Cold War IRBM and the Delta IV doesn't share the design heritage of the Thor IRBM or Delta II. The fast-approaching retirement of the Delta II will leave the Minotaur rockets the only SLVs in active service to be based on a Cold War ICBM.

Good. Its about time they got rid of those 5+ decades old designs. They suffer from parts obsolescence and part availability issues, are being out-performed by newer designs and are generally more expensive than their present-day counterparts.
Had Challenger never happened the Thor familiy of launch vehicles would have ceased to exist nearly 3 decades ago.

But isn't it good to know that the Thor-based Delta rockets have been such reliable launchers?

Well, except for Delta III.

Offline jbenton

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Re: Delta II - ICESat-2 - September 15, 2018
« Reply #75 on: 09/04/2018 08:00 pm »
I know all you are aware of the upcoming ICESat-2 launch, but when the ICESat-2 satellite is launched into orbit, the retirement of the Delta II will mark the retirement of the Thor family for good, because the Delta II is based off of an American Cold War IRBM and the Delta IV doesn't share the design heritage of the Thor IRBM or Delta II. The fast-approaching retirement of the Delta II will leave the Minotaur rockets the only SLVs in active service to be based on a Cold War ICBM.

I find it ironic, that the very last launch of a series of missiles intended to serve as nuclear-tipped ICBMs IRBMs will send up a satellite to track the effects of global warming.

"...and they shall beat their swords into plowshares, and their spears into pruning hooks..."

- Isaiah 2:4
- Micah 4:3
« Last Edit: 09/04/2018 08:11 pm by jbenton »

Offline russianhalo117

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Re: Delta II - ICESat-2 - September 15, 2018
« Reply #76 on: 09/04/2018 08:05 pm »
I know all you are aware of the upcoming ICESat-2 launch, but when the ICESat-2 satellite is launched into orbit, the retirement of the Delta II will mark the retirement of the Thor family for good, because the Delta II is based off of an American Cold War IRBM and the Delta IV doesn't share the design heritage of the Thor IRBM or Delta II. The fast-approaching retirement of the Delta II will leave the Minotaur rockets the only SLVs in active service to be based on a Cold War ICBM.

I find it ironic, that the very last launch of a series of missiles intended to serve as nuclear-tipped ICBMs will send up a satellite to track the effects of global warming.

"...and they shall beat their swords into plowshares, and their spears into pruning hooks..."

- Isaiah 2:4
- Micah 4:3
To be correct: Thor wasn't an ICBM, it was an IRBM.

Offline jbenton

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Re: Delta II - ICESat-2 - September 15, 2018
« Reply #77 on: 09/04/2018 08:11 pm »
Thanks

Offline russianhalo117

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Re: Delta II - ICESat-2 - September 15, 2018
« Reply #78 on: 09/04/2018 08:20 pm »
I know all you are aware of the upcoming ICESat-2 launch, but when the ICESat-2 satellite is launched into orbit, the retirement of the Delta II will mark the retirement of the Thor family for good, because the Delta II is based off of an American Cold War IRBM and the Delta IV doesn't share the design heritage of the Thor IRBM or Delta II. The fast-approaching retirement of the Delta II will leave the Minotaur rockets the only SLVs in active service to be based on a Cold War ICBM.

Good. Its about time they got rid of those 5+ decades old designs. They suffer from parts obsolescence and part availability issues, are being out-performed by newer designs and are generally more expensive than their present-day counterparts.
Had Challenger never happened the Thor familiy of launch vehicles would have ceased to exist nearly 3 decades ago.

But isn't it good to know that the Thor-based Delta rockets have been such reliable launchers?

Well, except for Delta III.
Actually that would be a pot calling the kettle black as there have been many failures in the Thor/Delta family (DII has a much better track record than its predecessor versions). Delta-II and Delta-III can't be compared as it wasn't ever declared operational and the D-III programme was shelved for 2 reasons: Comsat Market collapsed and Boeing and McDonnell Douglas merged resulting in the Boeing Delta-IV family being merged with the Delta-III Family (only one version of the 8000 series flew). Some Delta-III's which were built at the time of the cancelation and programme merger resulted in a few unflown D-III's. Had D-III continued flying the D-II family would have been retired and this flight would have likely flown on a D-III class rocket.

Offline ncb1397

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Re: Delta II - ICESat-2 - September 15, 2018
« Reply #79 on: 09/04/2018 08:30 pm »
I know all you are aware of the upcoming ICESat-2 launch, but when the ICESat-2 satellite is launched into orbit, the retirement of the Delta II will mark the retirement of the Thor family for good, because the Delta II is based off of an American Cold War IRBM and the Delta IV doesn't share the design heritage of the Thor IRBM or Delta II. The fast-approaching retirement of the Delta II will leave the Minotaur rockets the only SLVs in active service to be based on a Cold War ICBM.

Good. Its about time they got rid of those 5+ decades old designs. They suffer from parts obsolescence and part availability issues, are being out-performed by newer designs and are generally more expensive than their present-day counterparts.
Had Challenger never happened the Thor familiy of launch vehicles would have ceased to exist nearly 3 decades ago.

If you are referring to Falcon 9, it isn't cheaper.

Quote
The total cost for NASA to launch SWOT is approximately $112 million, which includes the launch service; spacecraft processing; payload integration; and tracking, data and telemetry support.
https://www.nasa.gov/press-release/nasa-selects-launch-services-for-global-surface-water-survey-mission

Quote
A firm fixed-price launch service task order has been awarded under the indefinite-delivery, indefinite-quantity NASA Launch Services (NLS) II contract. NASA's total cost to launch ICESat-2 is $96.6 million, including payload processing, integrated services, telemetry, reimbursables and other launch support requirements.
https://www.nasa.gov/home/hqnews/2013/feb/HQ_C13-011_ICESat-2_Launch.html

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