Author Topic: Equatorial Launch Australia  (Read 30783 times)

Online Steven Pietrobon

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Re: Equatorial Launch Australia
« Reply #60 on: 10/11/2023 04:03 am »
Here's an excellent podcast from ELA CEO Michael Jones.

https://www.spaceconnectonline.com.au/discovery/6015-podcast-australia-s-pioneering-spaceport-with-ela

They are planning on building seven space launch complexes (SLC). Each of the SLCs will each have an horizontal integration facility that is 45 m long, 26 m wide and with a 12 m high ceiling and 20 t crane. Six of these SLCs will have two pads, one fully developed and one undeveloped, serving one client each. The seventh SLC will be for general use and will have four pads. Each pad has an hydraulic lifting plate, exhaust plume deflector and water deluge system. For each client an interface to their vehicle and launch mount will be built.

Current planning is that two of the SLC's will be built by the end of 2024 with first launch on 15 March 2025 with up to 60 launches total per year from all the pads.
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Online Steven Pietrobon

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Re: Equatorial Launch Australia
« Reply #61 on: 10/16/2023 02:05 am »
ELA hires GM to oversee spaceport growth
Adam Thorn
12 October 2023
Equatorial Launch Australia has appointed a veteran aerospace executive to oversee the arrival of new rocket launch companies at its spaceport.

https://www.spaceconnectonline.com.au/launch/6018-ela-hires-gm-to-oversee-spaceport-growth
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Offline CameronD

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Re: Equatorial Launch Australia
« Reply #62 on: 12/19/2023 09:45 pm »
ELA unveils launch pad design for spaceport

Spaceport firm Equatorial Launch Australia has unveiled the final plans for its launch pads it believes are so versatile they can be used by multiple clients with minimal changes.

Other key features include technology to minimise damage from rocket plumes, mitigate environmental impacts and handle launch weights of up to 450,000kg.

It significantly comes after ELA announced earlier this year that a Korean launch company would become the first long-term tenant at its Arnhem Space Centre spaceport in the Northern Territory.

The company believes it can eventually accommodate up to seven rocket companies at its site, fuelled by strong demand for satellite launches combined with a lack of supply from traditional rocket companies overseas.

ELA said on Tuesday its Arnhem Space Centre Advanced Launch Pads (ASCALP) feature a “world first” and “state of the art” design.

https://www.spaceconnectonline.com.au/launch/6081-ela-unveils-launch-pad-design-for-spaceport

With sufficient thrust, pigs fly just fine - however, this is not necessarily a good idea. It is hard to be sure where they are
going to land, and it could be dangerous sitting under them as they fly overhead.

Online Steven Pietrobon

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Re: Equatorial Launch Australia
« Reply #63 on: 12/21/2023 02:05 am »
Here's the official press release.

https://ela.space/asc-advanced-launch-pad-ascalp-design-a-game-changer-in-multi-rocket-launch-pad/

ASC Advanced Launch Pad (ASCALP) design – a game changer in multi-rocket launch pad compatibility and reusable pad design for NewSpace rockets

Equatorial Launch Australia (ELA) has today released completed designs for its state-of-the-art launch pads – a world first in launch pad design allowing any NewSpace rocket to be quickly and seamlessly mated with the pivot base of the pad – enabling all seven Space Launch Complexes (SLCs) at the Arnhem Space Centre (ASC) to launch any rocket with very little notice for configuration change. The company believes this innovative design is the most advanced NewSpace small to medium rocket launch pad in the world and will help to meet rapid-responsive launch needs in the future. The design also significantly minimises damage created by rocket plumes, substantially increasing the reusability of the launch pads.
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Offline plugger.lockett

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Re: Equatorial Launch Australia
« Reply #64 on: 01/11/2024 03:35 am »
https://www.abc.net.au/news/2024-01-10/equatorial-launch-australia-dismisses-expansion-fears/103306204

This is right up there with the stories of people leaving Broome, WA post September 11 2001 as they were convinced it was a target for bin Laden.  :o

Offline TrevorMonty

Re: Equatorial Launch Australia
« Reply #65 on: 01/11/2024 01:22 pm »
https://www.abc.net.au/news/2024-01-10/equatorial-launch-australia-dismisses-expansion-fears/103306204

This is right up there with the stories of people leaving Broome, WA post September 11 2001 as they were convinced it was a target for bin Laden.  :o
This would be way down an enemies target list. I'd be more worried about cities that have naval bases.

Online Steven Pietrobon

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Re: Equatorial Launch Australia
« Reply #66 on: 01/25/2024 02:36 am »
https://ela.space/horizontal-integration-facility-for-asc-spaceport/

Delivering the Spaceport of the Future – HIF designs reveal full extent of ELA’s value offering to launch vehicle providers and payload customers.

23 January, 2024

* Release of the Horizontal Integration Facility designs completes the engineering design process for the Arnhem Space Centre’s Space Launch Complexes (SLC).
* The development of these designs follows extensive international research, analysis and customer input. ELA reviewed past launch successes and challenges and held discussions with other global spaceports and NASA to develop SLCs that exceed capability requirements for customers now and into the future.
* Each Resident Launcher taking up a long term, multi-launch residency at the Arnhem Space Centre will be allocated exclusive use of an SLC comprised of one standard HIF and up to two launch pads fitted with the recently announced ASCALP launch pads.
* Each of the seven SLCs are to be set up as restricted access areas providing launch companies secure sole access and commercial confidentiality during their residencies as well as compliance with ITAR (International Trade in Arms Restrictions), MTCR (Missile technology Control Regime) and TSA (Technology Safeguards Agreement) security requirements.

Equatorial Launch Australia (ELA) has today revealed completed designs for its Horizontal Integration Facility (HIF) buildings – state-of-the-art assembly, integration and testing facilities for each of up to seven rocket launch companies to be based at the Arnhem Space Centre (ASC). The purpose-built buildings offer a 40m (L) x 26m (W) x 12m (H) in standard configuration incorporating advanced space mission specific features providing launch vehicle companies and satellite payload manufacturers with cutting edge facilities to ensure their mission success.

The announcement comes on the back of the release of ELA’s ‘game changer’ ASCALP launch pad designs in December 2023. The delivery of the HIF designs completes the company’s designs for its ‘Space Launch Complex’ (SLC) – a designated area of the spaceport at which each resident launcher will locate for all preparatory work prior to and including lift off – and is comprised of up to two launch pads and one HIF building for each launch company.

“The public release of our completed HIF designs at the Arnhem Space Centre is another major milestone for ELA and we are incredibly excited to be able to share these designs with our current and future customers and with the wider space industry,” said Michael Jones, Executive Chairman and Group CEO, Equatorial Launch Australia. “We are confident that our facilities and services are, and will be, truly world leading, and we are very much looking forward to offering our customers a best-in-class experience from the moment they sign with ELA.”

“Our approach from day one was to stand in the shoes of our clients and look at everything they need to have a successful launch campaign from the ASC. The SLC concept and the HIF design is far more detailed and complex than first meets the eye and will set the standard for launch operations. The innovative designs were born from extensive and comprehensive international research on current and past spaceport service offerings and deep discussions with customers on their current and future launch needs, while also considering the needs of regulators, commercial partners and us as the spaceport operator,” said Mr Jones. “An example of this is our high clearance ISO 8 cleanroom which has 8m high ceiling and 8m high sliding doors for vertical payload integration.”

“We wanted to guarantee we were building a Spaceport of the Future for our customers and so we invested a significant amount of time and resources analysing and planning to ensure we could be as adaptable and as supportive as our customers required, while also aiming to set the bar for best practice in spaceport service and design,” he said.

Designed for modularity and flexibility, the high-specification standard HIF is designed to meet and exceed the requirements of most launch vehicle providers to give them with the extra-mile service they require.

Key features of each HIF include:

    A large 20mx 40m rocket assembly area with static discharge points, in floor pneumatic, and electrical power for assembly, integration and testing of the launch vehicles.
    A high clearance ISO 8 cleanroom with 8m high ceiling and sliding door/ceiling for vertical payload integration. The cleanroom doubles as payload workshop and is fully fitted for multiple payload preparation and integration.
    A 20,000kg full-space overhead gantry crane with a height clearance under the hook of 9m and a second 2 tonne capacity hook for payload movement.
    An indoor and enclosed workshop space to undertake minor repair/prototyping and fabrication work.
    A multi-port wall membrane for direct access to and use of launch pad equipment like container mounted power, umbilical and other support systems.
    An administrative and personnel area that offers office space, amenities and utility/storerooms.
    Large 6m (W) x 8m (H) clearance roller doors at each end of the building accommodating rockets mounted on the ASC Rocket Trolley with strongback/rail attached. The buildings also have “air lock” dust prevention entrances at each end.
    The buildings incorporate substantive insulation and HVAC climate control for the harsh NT environment. Similarly, the building is fully cyclone rated and environmentally friendly.
    Each SLC and HIF will have advanced security measures including day/night camera, movement sensors and digital access control/recording.

ELA went to extreme lengths to understand each of our clients’ individual needs and those learnings have been incorporated into this project. ELA management also visited a wide range of key spaceports globally to view and discuss facility needs. This was all aimed at ensuring ELA provides each customer with the most appropriate and capable ‘home away from home’ for their launch operations. “It’s our aim to be the spaceport partner of choice where we can work with our customers to give them the absolute best chance of repeated successful missions,” said Mr Jones.

“Whilst functionality and cost effectiveness are critical in these designs, ELA wanted to make a statement in terms of finishes, aesthetics and functionality. “We wanted more than a ‘Colorbond box’ or a just hangar, so we ensured our architects went a little ‘edgy’ and used plenty of angles and a mix of finishes and materials. Each of the seven buildings will also be a different colour and be sympathetic to the land in orientation. We are putting a lot of effort into the landscaping and vegetation to harmonise with the NT environment,“ he said.
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Offline CameronD

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Re: Equatorial Launch Australia
« Reply #67 on: 01/25/2024 03:20 am »
.........
The buildings incorporate substantive insulation and HVAC climate control for the harsh NT environment. Similarly, the building is fully cyclone rated and environmentally friendly.
.........

Purdy!! Although I do wonder:
1. How they plan to build them at a site where most everything has to come in by barge and/or unmade roads
2. How those gutters will stand up to a tropical downpour, and
3. What they'll look like after a year or three in the tropics with little or no exterior maintenance.

Time will tell  :)
With sufficient thrust, pigs fly just fine - however, this is not necessarily a good idea. It is hard to be sure where they are
going to land, and it could be dangerous sitting under them as they fly overhead.

Offline plugger.lockett

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Re: Equatorial Launch Australia
« Reply #68 on: 02/02/2024 01:37 am »

Purdy!! Although I do wonder:
1. How they plan to build them at a site where most everything has to come in by barge and/or unmade roads
Considering they already have significant infrastructure on site this hardly seems to be an issue.
Quote
2. How those gutters will stand up to a tropical downpour, and
They're concept images, not 'as built' documentation.
Quote
3. What they'll look like after a year or three in the tropics with little or no exterior maintenance.
Where exactly did it state they'd not do exterior maintenance?
Also, it's not like building launch facilities in the tropics is an unknown/unknown, Guiana Space Centre immediately comes to mind.

Offline CameronD

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Re: Equatorial Launch Australia
« Reply #69 on: 02/02/2024 02:33 am »
Purdy!! Although I do wonder:
1. How they plan to build them at a site where most everything has to come in by barge and/or unmade roads
Considering they already have significant infrastructure on site this hardly seems to be an issue.

Really?!?  I must have missed it in the tall grass.
With sufficient thrust, pigs fly just fine - however, this is not necessarily a good idea. It is hard to be sure where they are
going to land, and it could be dangerous sitting under them as they fly overhead.

Offline plugger.lockett

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Re: Equatorial Launch Australia
« Reply #70 on: 02/09/2024 01:17 am »
Considering they already have significant infrastructure on site this hardly seems to be an issue.

Really?!?  I must have missed it in the tall grass.

Look harder lol. Below is a picture of the most significant commercial launch site in Australia to date, both in terms of infrastructure and actually launching rockets into space.

It seems you might be confused with another domestic launch company, which appears to have next to no launch infra at their "Orbital Launch Complex".

Online Steven Pietrobon

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Re: Equatorial Launch Australia
« Reply #71 on: 02/19/2024 03:45 am »
"Equatorial Space Systems to launch from Arnhem Space Centre

Equatorial Launch Australia (ELA) has announced the signing of a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) with Singaporean rocket company Equatorial Space Systems (ESS) for a series of launches of the Dorado family of suborbital rockets at the Arnhem Space Centre, planned for late 2024."

https://spaceanddefense.io/equatorial-launch-australia-to-launch-from-arnhem-space-centre/
« Last Edit: 02/19/2024 03:46 am by Steven Pietrobon »
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Offline CameronD

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Re: Equatorial Launch Australia
« Reply #72 on: 02/19/2024 04:54 am »
FWIW, that pic was taken at Avalon Airshow in March last year.  Here's one of my own from the same location.
With sufficient thrust, pigs fly just fine - however, this is not necessarily a good idea. It is hard to be sure where they are
going to land, and it could be dangerous sitting under them as they fly overhead.

Offline Metalskin

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Re: Equatorial Launch Australia
« Reply #73 on: 02/19/2024 05:47 am »
FWIW, that pic was taken at Avalon Airshow in March last year.  Here's one of my own from the same location.

Wow, it's been many a decade since I went to the Avalon Airshow!

Thank you for sharing :-)
How inappropriate to call this planet Earth when it is quite clearly Ocean. - Arthur C. Clarke

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