Author Topic: UK steps up, as ESA commit to ATV Service Module on NASA's Orion  (Read 352727 times)

Offline saundby

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Did RS-72 ever finish development? If so, that seems like it should be a strong contender. Same propellants as AJ10-190, but twice the thrust and a 24 second ISP increase, could substantially improve performance. Its a gas generator engine though, which could affect safety.

Uprated OMS completed development at Aerojet, flight hardware was constructed and qualified and accepted, but never integrated into STS. So far as I know, there are several shipsets of these engines sitting on shelves. I believe five pairs were completed.

Offline hektor

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You mean these ones ?

Offline russianhalo117

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Did RS-72 ever finish development? If so, that seems like it should be a strong contender. Same propellants as AJ10-190, but twice the thrust and a 24 second ISP increase, could substantially improve performance. Its a gas generator engine though, which could affect safety.

Uprated OMS completed development at Aerojet, flight hardware was constructed and qualified and accepted, but never integrated into STS. So far as I know, there are several shipsets of these engines sitting on shelves. I believe five pairs were completed.
All Shuttle programme OMS engines were transferred to SLS programme and the one that will be tested in the propulsion article above is an AJ10 that flew on shuttle.

Source: http://www.rocket.com/orion-main-engine
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Aerojet Rocketdyne is supporting refurbishment of Shuttle OMS-E engines for use as the Orion Main Engine (OME) during the Exploration Mission-1 flight. The refurbished Shuttle engines will provide 6,000 lbf of thrust to support major in-space maneuvers of the Orion spacecraft.
« Last Edit: 03/02/2017 06:33 pm by russianhalo117 »

Offline russianhalo117

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You mean these ones ?
No,
OMS-E BPE's produce 6,000 lbf of thrust and the derated derivative in the article produces only 4,000 lbf of thrust.
OEM Source: http://www.rocket.com/orion-main-engine and http://www.rocket.com/space-shuttle-oms-engines

Offline hektor

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Offline hektor

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Europe powers up for third and fourth Orion spacecraft

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Space19+ results also give ESA mandate to start procuring ‘long-lead items’ that require more time to develop and build – allowing industrial partners to prepare early equipment needed for a fifth and sixth European Service Module.

Offline hektor

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There is a European Service Module announcement today at 10:30 UTC (5:30 EST).

« Last Edit: 02/02/2021 07:22 am by hektor »

Offline hektor

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Going live.

Offline hektor

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Well they should take some lessons from NASA about LIVE events and public speaking


Online jacqmans

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Three more service modules for Artemis to be built in Europe
02/02/2021

ESA signed a further contract with Airbus for the construction of three more European Service Modules for Orion, NASA’s spacecraft that will fly astronauts to the Moon and lunar Gateway as part of the Artemis programme.

With these European Service Modules – in addition to three already in production – ESA is ensuring NASA’s Artemis programme continues to develop a sustainable presence on and around the Moon in international partnership. The three modules will be integrated in Bremen, Germany, with components and hardware built and supplied by companies from 10 countries in Europe.

The European Service Module will be used to fly astronauts to the Moon. As the powerhouse for the Orion spacecraft it provides propulsion and the consumables astronauts need to stay alive.

David Parker, ESA’s director of Human and Robotic Exploration, said: “This contract doubles Europe’s commitment to delivering the vital hardware to send humankind to the Moon on Orion. Together with the elements we are building for the lunar Gateway we are guaranteeing seats for ESA astronauts to explore our Solar System as well as securing employment and technological know-how for Europe.”

“Europe has entered a new decade of exploration,” said Andreas Hammer, Head of Space Exploration at Airbus, “Building six Orion European Service Modules is a venture like no other. Airbus has some of the world’s best minds in space exploration working on this phenomenal vehicle and this new agreement will facilitate many future Moon missions through international partnerships. Europe is a strong and reliable partner in NASA’s Artemis missions and the Orion European Service Module represents a crucial contribution to this.”

European Service Modules are cylinders measuring 4 m in diameter and height. They have four solar arrays spanning 19 m across when unfurled that generate enough energy to power two households. The service module’s 8.6 tonnes of fuel can power one main engine and 32 smaller thrusters. It also provides the crew with the central elements of life support such as water and oxygen, and regulates thermal control while attached to the crew module.

Artemis I, the first non-crewed Orion test flight with a European Service Module is being fuelled at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, USA, in preparation for its flight later this year. The next mission, Artemis II, will see the first astronauts fly around the Moon and back to Earth, its European Service Module is finalising integration in Bremen. With Artemis III, NASA will land the first woman and next man on the Moon.

The modules announced today will be used for the Artemis IV to VI missions. The first two of these three Modules in the contract are the European contribution to the international lunar Gateway.

https://www.esa.int/Science_Exploration/Human_and_Robotic_Exploration/Orion/Three_more_service_modules_for_Artemis_to_be_built_in_Europe
Jacques :-)

Offline hektor

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Offline Proponent

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Still no indication how much ESA is spending on ESM (as opposed to how much contractors are getting)?

Online woods170

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Still no indication how much ESA is spending on ESM (as opposed to how much contractors are getting)?

And you will likely not see exact figures anytime soon. ESA is not NASA. ESA is much less transparent.

Offline hektor

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AFP says contract value is 650 million €. As a reference when ESM-3 was signed the figure provided was 250 million €.

Online woods170

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AFP says contract value is 650 million €. As a reference when ESM-3 was signed the figure provided was 250 million €.

Yes, but that is contract value. Which is less than what ESA is spending on the ESMs in total. Things like overhead, use of ESA facilities with no charge to Airbus, insight/oversight activities..... these are all examples of activities outside the contract between Airbus and ESA. Yet they still cost ESA additional money. Just how much additional money is unknown.

And thus the total amount of money spent, by ESA, on the ESMs is unclear. The only thing that is certain, is that it is more than just the contract values.

Offline hektor

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Most of ESM testing seems to have been performed at Airbus, at NASA or at Lockheed so I suspect the use of ESA facilities has been limited.
« Last Edit: 02/02/2021 05:38 pm by hektor »

Offline hektor

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Offline hektor

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2021/2022 overview of Artemis and the European Service Modules

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... the fourth Service Module structure is expected to arrive in the Summer. This module will be part of the Artemis IV mission and will see Orion push the I-Hab crew module to the lunar Gateway.

ESA’s regular Ministerial Council will be held in November of this year where the delegates from the Member States will discuss and decide on the future of the next round of European Service Modules: seven, eight and nine.
« Last Edit: 01/28/2022 09:12 am by hektor »

Offline hektor

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