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Space Science Coverage / Re: IM-1 Odysseus lunar lander
« Last post by wannamoonbase on Today at 06:02 pm »
LRO is going to pass over the landing area in daylight late on the 24th, and because of the near-polar site it will be close enough for off-nadir imaging on many orbits around that time.  We should get something fairly quickly.  Don't hold your breath for Chandrayaan 2's OHRC - even if it takes an image it could be months before it is released.  As far as I know we still don't have an OHRC image of SLIM (if it's on the ground it has not been released).

I've been thinking about LRO.  Can it function as a relay?
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ULA - Delta, Atlas, Vulcan / Re: Potential sale of ULA
« Last post by edkyle99 on Today at 05:58 pm »
... New Glenn will eventually cost far less for the same performance.   ... Oh Ed, you are so funny sometimes. Weren't you part of the "wisdom of the crowd" that denounced the efforts of SpaceX to reuse the Falcon 9 1st stage?

Well the genie is out of the bottle with reusing 1st stages, and Blue Origin is applying that knowledge to their New Glenn  ...
Denounce?  Never.  Question the cost assumptions?  Sure.  I still wonder what Falcon 9 really costs to launch, a value that is aided as much by its unprecedented launch rate as by its partial reuse. 

The assumption by many is that New Glenn will cost less because its first stage will be reused.  Never mind that this rocket is nearly as tall as a Saturn 5 or that each launch will expend a stage that weighs (and probably costs) twice as much as a Centaur 5 or Falcon 9 second stage, or that some of those first stages are going to be lost, or that it will fly far less often than Falcon 9. 

Just because New Glenn will be partly reusable doesn't guarantee lower costs.   STS was also a partly reusable giant and also used staged combustion engines burning cryogenic propellants. 

We will see.

 - Ed Kyle
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ISS Section / Re: Expedition 70 Thread
« Last post by ddspaceman on Today at 05:57 pm »
Expedition 70 Relaxes as SpaceX Crew-8 Preps for Launch

Mark Garcia Posted on February 23, 2024

The seven-member Expedition 70 crew relaxed on Friday following a busy week of space research and cargo transfers beginning a three-day weekend. The orbital septet will go into the final days of February continuing its microgravity science while also preparing to welcome four new Commercial Crew members to the International Space Station.

On Sunday, Feb. 25, four SpaceX Crew-8 members will arrive at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) for a five-day quarantine period. The Falcon 9 rocket with the Dragon spacecraft atop will also roll out to its launch pad at KSCís Launch Complex 39A the same day. NASA astronauts Matthew Dominick, Michael Barratt, and Jeanette Epps and Roscosmos cosmonaut Alexander Grebenkin are in final preparations for their lift off aboard Dragon targeted for 12:04 a.m. EDT on Friday, March 1. The quartet will rendezvous with the orbital outpost just over a day later and dock to the Harmony moduleís forward port on Saturday, March 2.

The four Dragon crewmates will be greeted by the station residents, call down to Earth for a welcoming ceremony with family and mission officials, then participate in a mandatory onboard safety briefing. The commercial quartet will become Expedition 70-71 crew members and remain in space until mid-summer.

During a six-month stay aboard the orbital lab, the Crew-8 foursome will research a multitude of space phenomena to improve life for humans living on and off the Earth. The quartet will explore the mechanisms behind neurological disorders, ways to prevent fluid shifts that occur in astronauts living in space, how microgravity affects plant growth, and how algae may improve spacecraft life support systems.

About a week later, four SpaceX Crew-7 crew members who have been aboard the space station since Aug. 27, 2023, will undock from the Harmonyís space-facing port aboard the SpaceX Dragon Endurance spacecraft. Astronauts Jasmin Moghbeli, Andreas Mogensen, and Satoshi Furukawa along with cosmonaut Konstantin Borisov are planned to take a dayís ride orbiting Earth inside Endurance before splashing down off the coast of Florida ending a six-and-a-half-month mission in space.

https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacestation/2024/02/23/expedition-70-relaxes-as-spacex-crew-8-preps-for-launch/

The crew of NASAís SpaceX Crew-8 mission to the International Space Station poses for a photo during their Crew Equipment Interface Test at NASAís Kennedy Space Center in Florida.
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https://x.com/vickicocks15/status/1761088226188517426?s=46&t=cTjC_-DejCAEkjC1ym-Phw

If you told me this was a jank trailer hitch repair with a $99 Harbor Freight MIG welder and some JB weld Iíd believe you.
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Space Science Coverage / Re: IM-1 Odysseus lunar lander
« Last post by Phil Stooke on Today at 05:48 pm »
LRO is going to pass over the landing area in daylight late on the 24th, and because of the near-polar site it will be close enough for off-nadir imaging on many orbits around that time.  We should get something fairly quickly.  Don't hold your breath for Chandrayaan 2's OHRC - even if it takes an image it could be months before it is released.  As far as I know we still don't have an OHRC image of SLIM (if it's on the ground it has not been released).
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Space Science Coverage / Re: IM-1 Odysseus lunar lander
« Last post by yg1968 on Today at 05:45 pm »
https://www.nasa.gov/news-release/nasa-intuitive-machines-to-discuss-historic-moon-mission-today/

NASA, Intuitive Machines to Discuss Historic Moon Mission Today

NASA and Intuitive Machines will host a televised news conference at 5 p.m. EST Friday, Feb. 23 (=22:00 UTC), to detail the Odysseus landerís historic soft Moon landing.


A Friday 5pm press conference is never good news...

I don't know about that, they are probabaly just waiting to have enough news to be able to answer some of the questions.
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Space Science Coverage / Re: IM-1 Odysseus lunar lander
« Last post by Svetoslav on Today at 05:44 pm »
So... no EagleCam photos this evening. I don't know if I should hope for any images... It's so disappointing one day later nothing has been published despite being reassured that it's "in excellent health".
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ULA - Delta, Atlas, Vulcan / Re: Potential sale of ULA
« Last post by wannamoonbase on Today at 05:40 pm »
I can't see why Vulcan and New Glenn could not be team mates. Vulcan is your usual ELV - not reusable, narrow diameter, less than 30 mt to LEO.
New Glenn is something much bigger and partially reusable - 45 mt to orbit, 7 m diameter.
If a NG launch is lower cost than any Vulcan Centaur launch for all payloads then why would BO/ULA offer the Vulcan Centaur at all? BO?ULA would make more money at the same price by using NG. Only two reasons I can think of:
   -- NG is not yet available
   -- there might be NSSL missions that Vulcan Centaur can fly but NG cannot. (I don't know if these exist).

Ok don't laugh, maybe Starliner flights?

Thats the only thing I come up for longterm for Vulcan.


Maybe BO can buy Starliner from Boeing for a discount.  (But maybe Starliner is not worth the price, even if it's free)
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A long time ago the little birdies told me that the time required to approve something is frequently down to how many people are available that cover the region the applicant resides in.

I expect this factor hasnít changed since then.
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