Author Topic: SpaceX Falcon 9 / Dragon 2 : SpX-DM1 : March 2, 2019 : DISCUSSION  (Read 591449 times)

Offline Rocket Science

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Could just be materials out-gassing like 20 years back...
"The laws of physics are unforgiving"
~Rob: Physics instructor, Aviator

Offline punder

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Maybe a little exhalation of Dragon's breath. I just noticed--under certain lighting conditions it really does look like a Dragon!

Offline Prettz

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I think the time line is interesting.

2010. First Dragon test launched on first F9

2012 Cargo deliveries start to be berthed at ISS

2019 First docking of crew rated Dragon to ISS

7 years from first arrival of a Dragon at ISS.

I'd love to know where most of that time went. Specifically who raised the lions share of the complaints, issues and questions.

My guess is either ASAP or the Russians, for different reasons.

ASAP couldn't believe an aerospace company that didn't exist during Mercury, Gemini, Apollo or Shuttle could be any good and the Russians because they know their era of charge-whatever-they-like is coming to an end.

TBH I doubted if NASA would give SX the first go at launching to the ISS, but they did.

Congratulations to all at SX for their perseverance.
There was 3 years of sabotaged program funding during the beginning, and that hurt the timeline a lot.

Offline Alexphysics

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Why barge and not land landing for the first stage?

I thought it would have enough performance for coming back to cape canaveral on this kind of payload.

This kind of payload? What do you expect with a +12 metric ton spacecraft on top of the rocket?

It's not a 12+-tonne spacecraft. I'ts closer to 11 tonnes.

So it should be about 11.5 tonnes.

Quote
This is the heaviest thing a Falcon 9 has ever launched to ANY orbit.

This is the EASIEST orbit of practically any F9 launches. Most other orbits have been either GTO or polar, which both require more delta-v.

The DM-1 Crew Dragon's mass is 12055kg it is literally a 12+ metric ton spacecraft

Offline Damon Hill

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FYI on the Amazon comment, I went to Blue Origin in Kent to see their facility and they told me that whenever SpaceX had a big launch or rendezvous the BO crew would all get together in front of a big screen and watch. They would cheer enthusiastically on SpaceXís success. I thought that was great.

A high tide lifts all ships.

Offline ZachF

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So, what's that in the cabin with Starman-2? A plushie of some sort? Didn't Elon want him getting 'lonely up in space' or something?
Think of it the same as the plush toys the Russians bring along on the Soyuz flights, a zero G indicator.

So where does one go online to buy one of these for the grandchildren?

Can't find anything quite like it on Amazon.  :(


Probably can't find it on Amazon since it wasn't a Blue Origin capsule.

artist, so take opinions expressed above with a well-rendered grain of salt...
https://www.instagram.com/artzf/

Offline ThereIWas3

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Amazon lists it.  But it does not ship from Amazon.  Amazon just takes the order and passes it on to sellers.  Those sellers are currently showing it at 2x to 3x the original price from "Celestial Buddies", the manufacturer.

Offline hopalong

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So, what's that in the cabin with Starman-2? A plushie of some sort? Didn't Elon want him getting 'lonely up in space' or something?
Think of it the same as the plush toys the Russians bring along on the Soyuz flights, a zero G indicator.

So where does one go online to buy one of these for the grandchildren?

Can't find anything quite like it on Amazon.  :(


Probably can't find it on Amazon since it wasn't a Blue Origin capsule.

They were available - search on 'GiggleBeaver Celestial Buddies - Earth Cuddly Toy' in Amazon, but out of stock, there was a run on them a couple of days before the launch.



Offline Star One

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Will they in future be using the Dragon 2 when it’s docked to the ISS as part of the living space of the station being as unlike Soyuz it is quite roomy?

Offline Electric Paint

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Why barge and not land landing for the first stage?

I thought it would have enough performance for coming back to cape canaveral on this kind of payload.

This kind of payload? What do you expect with a +12 metric ton spacecraft on top of the rocket?


It's not a 12+-tonne spacecraft. I'ts closer to 11 tonnes.

So it should be about 11.5 tonnes.

Quote
This is the heaviest thing a Falcon 9 has ever launched to ANY orbit.

This is the EASIEST orbit of practically any F9 launches. Most other orbits have been either GTO or polar, which both require more delta-v.

The DM-1 Crew Dragon's mass is 12055kg it is literally a 12+ metric ton spacecraft

The Block 5 does have enough performance to return to the launch site, even with a Dragon 2, but for this mission, NASA stipulated that the booster stage remain ignited for a longer period, in order to apply a safety margin of performance for the upper stage. I believe that this was mentioned in one of the NSF articles covering this mission.

Offline Joffan

Will they in future be using the Dragon 2 when itís docked to the ISS as part of the living space of the station being as unlike Soyuz it is quite roomy?
With a little screen they could probably use the Dragon for two sleeping quarters.
« Last Edit: 03/03/2019 09:37 pm by Joffan »
Getting through max-Q for humanity becoming fully spacefaring

Offline Rocket Science

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Will they in future be using the Dragon 2 when itís docked to the ISS as part of the living space of the station being as unlike Soyuz it is quite roomy?
With a little screen they could probably use the Dragon for two sleeping quarters.
Or a movie theater...
"The laws of physics are unforgiving"
~Rob: Physics instructor, Aviator

Offline daedalus1

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Will they in future be using the Dragon 2 when itís docked to the ISS as part of the living space of the station being as unlike Soyuz it is quite roomy?

The Soyuz is quite roomy with the orbital module.

Offline marsbase

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Will they in future be using the Dragon 2 when itís docked to the ISS as part of the living space of the station being as unlike Soyuz it is quite roomy?
With a little screen they could probably use the Dragon for two sleeping quarters.
Or a movie theater...
Showing Musk films 24/7 :)  https://www.imdb.com/name/nm1907769/#actor

Offline Alexphysics

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Why barge and not land landing for the first stage?

I thought it would have enough performance for coming back to cape canaveral on this kind of payload.

This kind of payload? What do you expect with a +12 metric ton spacecraft on top of the rocket?


It's not a 12+-tonne spacecraft. I'ts closer to 11 tonnes.

So it should be about 11.5 tonnes.

Quote
This is the heaviest thing a Falcon 9 has ever launched to ANY orbit.

This is the EASIEST orbit of practically any F9 launches. Most other orbits have been either GTO or polar, which both require more delta-v.

The DM-1 Crew Dragon's mass is 12055kg it is literally a 12+ metric ton spacecraft

The Block 5 does have enough performance to return to the launch site, even with a Dragon 2, but for this mission, NASA stipulated that the booster stage remain ignited for a longer period, in order to apply a safety margin of performance for the upper stage. I believe that this was mentioned in one of the NSF articles covering this mission.

I know, it's not like I've been precisely out of the loop and that I don't know what they have said on the post-FRR briefing, the pre-launch press conference and the post-launch press conference. I just mentioned that "this kind of payload" sounds as it is, I don't know, like SAOCOM 1A or satellites like that and no. This is a 12 metric ton monster and if on top of that they have to reserve performance "just in case", then it's highly understandable why they can't do an RTLS landing.

Offline Barrie

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Will they in future be using the Dragon 2 when itís docked to the ISS as part of the living space of the station being as unlike Soyuz it is quite roomy?
With a little screen they could probably use the Dragon for two sleeping quarters.
Or a movie theater...
Showing Musk films 24/7 :)  https://www.imdb.com/name/nm1907769/#actor
An orbital grindhouse? I think Musk would love that idea!

Alternatively, iirc the ATV was used as a quiet space, so it may go that way

Offline theonlyspace

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What rockets will Dragon use to deorbit for re-entry? 

Offline ugordan

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Regular Dracos.

Offline JimO

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I'm still unable to find any word on the second stage deorbit burn. Was there a NOTAMS for post-entry debris impact hazards?

Offline Torbjorn Larsson, OM

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Why barge and not land landing for the first stage?

I thought it would have enough performance for coming back to cape canaveral on this kind of payload.

This kind of payload? What do you expect with a +12 metric ton spacecraft on top of the rocket?


It's not a 12+-tonne spacecraft. I'ts closer to 11 tonnes.

So it should be about 11.5 tonnes.

Quote
This is the heaviest thing a Falcon 9 has ever launched to ANY orbit.

This is the EASIEST orbit of practically any F9 launches. Most other orbits have been either GTO or polar, which both require more delta-v.

The DM-1 Crew Dragon's mass is 12055kg it is literally a 12+ metric ton spacecraft

The Block 5 does have enough performance to return to the launch site, even with a Dragon 2, but for this mission, NASA stipulated that the booster stage remain ignited for a longer period, in order to apply a safety margin of performance for the upper stage. I believe that this was mentioned in one of the NSF articles covering this mission.

Didn't Scott Manley post a video comparison between the Dragons with a flatter flight profile for crewed Dragon to limit the (I assume down range) accelerations in case of abort?  I don't see why NASA would be concerned with US performance as much as with test-as-you-fly scenarios.

EDIT: Spelling.
« Last Edit: 03/03/2019 10:45 pm by Torbjorn Larsson, OM »

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