Author Topic: LIVE: SpaceX Dragon COTS Demo (C2+) FD10 - EOM - UNBERTH, ENTRY, SPLASHDOWN  (Read 286279 times)

Offline SpacexULA

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I don't know. I didn't find the landing of the dragon into the ocean that exciting. Maybe its just me. I'll wait until they have landing boosters before I can get really excited. But falling into the ocean, its just so old and archaic!

Exact Oposite for me, gliding in from orbit in a vehicle with less thrust and a worse glide ratio than a Wright Flyer does not seem more advanced than returning like a capsule from the Apollo program.

No Bucks no Buck Rogers, but at least Flexible path gets you Twiki.

Offline Comga

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Is there any information on where the the Trunk reentered, and where the debris fell if any survived?  Do we even know where the reentry point was?
What kind of wastrels would dump a perfectly good booster in the ocean after just one use?

Offline wjbarnett

Trunk sep was AFTER the re-entry engine burn, so it reentered at the same time as Dragon.
Jack

Offline Lars_J

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I'm really curious to find out what the G-loads were in the C2 Dragon reentry. Does anyone know of any official data from SpaceX on the subject?

People keep guessing 4-5 G's (certainly plausible), so some hard facts would be useful.

Offline Comga

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Trunk sep was AFTER the re-entry engine burn, so it reentered at the same time as Dragon.

That was assumed, seeing that the Trunk doesn't have it's own deorbit thrusters. 

So, where was the entry point for Dragon?  What is the distance from atmospheric entry to splash-down? 
What kind of wastrels would dump a perfectly good booster in the ocean after just one use?

Offline saturnapollo

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I bet it's a ribbon printer, the thought of a leaky ink cartridge in space.....

Would an injet using liquid ink actually work in micro gravity? I suspect it needs gravity to feed the nozzles.

Keith

Online AnalogMan

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I bet it's a ribbon printer, the thought of a leaky ink cartridge in space.....

Would an injet using liquid ink actually work in micro gravity? I suspect it needs gravity to feed the nozzles.

Keith

Color ink-jet printers were used on shuttle orbiters - I think they were Epson (in the early days they used teleprinters and thermal impulse printers).  In recent times printers were occasionally swapped between orbiter and ISS, so the ISS also uses ink-jets.
« Last Edit: 06/11/2012 12:55 am by AnalogMan »

Offline kevin-rf

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I bet it's a ribbon printer, the thought of a leaky ink cartridge in space.....

Would an injet using liquid ink actually work in micro gravity? I suspect it needs gravity to feed the nozzles.

Keith

I suspect capillary action plays a more significant role...
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Offline baldusi

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I bet it's a ribbon printer, the thought of a leaky ink cartridge in space.....

Would an injet using liquid ink actually work in micro gravity? I suspect it needs gravity to feed the nozzles.

Keith
There are three main technologies (HP, Epson and Canon). One has a jet that strikes the paper directly (HP), the other uses magnetic ink that's deviated and reused magnetically, but then it's let go when it has to print (Epson) and the third uses a bubble that's heated and sort of burst to send the ink (Canon). It would seem that the Epson process would be the most applicable to microgravity, since it's based on magnets and not on gravity. Incidentally, you can make a device to capture air borne ink with magnetic polarity. Thus, I suspect that the Epson system is somehow enhanced with stray ink capture mechanism.

Offline Retired Downrange

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Video linked by   SpaceX via FB

New video from the American Museum of Natural History shows historic Dragon mission milestones.

Science Bulletins: SpaceX Dragon Succeeds in Historic Mission


Offline saturnapollo

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here are three main technologies (HP, Epson and Canon). One has a jet that strikes the paper directly (HP), the other uses magnetic ink that's deviated and reused magnetically, but then it's let go when it has to print (Epson) and the third uses a bubble that's heated and sort of burst to send the ink (Canon). It would seem that the Epson process would be the most applicable to microgravity, since it's based on magnets and not on gravity. Incidentally, you can make a device to capture air borne ink with magnetic polarity. Thus, I suspect that the Epson system is somehow enhanced with stray ink capture mechanism.

Thanks for that. Very interesting. Capillary action too.

Keith

Offline Space Pete

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Offline Comga

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Can anyone state the offset distance of the landing location from the target?

It was said that COTS-1 landes within 800 meters of the target.  That was a small fraction of the 10.7 km median offset for Soyuz, but COTS-2 is a much better comparision, having returned from the ISS.
What kind of wastrels would dump a perfectly good booster in the ocean after just one use?

Offline RDoc

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There are three main technologies (HP, Epson and Canon). One has a jet that strikes the paper directly (HP), the other uses magnetic ink that's deviated and reused magnetically, but then it's let go when it has to print (Epson) and the third uses a bubble that's heated and sort of burst to send the ink (Canon). It would seem that the Epson process would be the most applicable to microgravity, since it's based on magnets and not on gravity. Incidentally, you can make a device to capture air borne ink with magnetic polarity. Thus, I suspect that the Epson system is somehow enhanced with stray ink capture mechanism.
Epson uses a piezoelectric system to create and propel droplets, there's no magnetic system involved. I believe that was a very old technology that never went anywhere.

In many Epson printers the cartridges are pressurized, but I believe still rely on gravity to get the ink down to the pickup tube. I doubt any would work in microgravity.

Offline Prober

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There are three main technologies (HP, Epson and Canon). One has a jet that strikes the paper directly (HP), the other uses magnetic ink that's deviated and reused magnetically, but then it's let go when it has to print (Epson) and the third uses a bubble that's heated and sort of burst to send the ink (Canon). It would seem that the Epson process would be the most applicable to microgravity, since it's based on magnets and not on gravity. Incidentally, you can make a device to capture air borne ink with magnetic polarity. Thus, I suspect that the Epson system is somehow enhanced with stray ink capture mechanism.
Epson uses a piezoelectric system to create and propel droplets, there's no magnetic system involved. I believe that was a very old technology that never went anywhere.

In many Epson printers the cartridges are pressurized, but I believe still rely on gravity to get the ink down to the pickup tube. I doubt any would work in microgravity.

the magnetic was a dry powder to paper system it was manufactured and failed.    The Epson should work "propel droplets" is the key.  Only issue might be to change the gap from nozzles to paper with some form of cover so it doesn't spray into the atmosphere.
 
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Offline RDoc

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The Epson should work "propel droplets" is the key.  Only issue might be to change the gap from nozzles to paper with some form of cover so it doesn't spray into the atmosphere.
The ink has to get picked up by the feed channels in the cartridge. In some cartridges pressure forces the ink up the feed against gravity, in others that feed from the bottom, gravity does the job. In both cases though, gravity is needed to keep the ink in a pool at the bottom of the cartridge. I don't think there are any printers that use a closed completely collapsing bag for the ink or anything like that.

Of course the printer could be fitted with small ullage motors and just fly about the interior while printing.  ;D

Offline RDoc

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I finally did some research on this. Apparently they flew an Epson Stylus 800 with some modifications on the Shuttle, but I couldn't find any mention of modifications to the ink feed so presumably it was the stock system. That printer uses a sponge inside the cartridge to prevent sloshing and bubbles as the head moves, so apparently it also works as a capillary medium to feed ink to the head pickup as well.

I'm actually amazed that works. The suction of the print head must be enough to pull the ink out of the sponge and something like the wetting of the sponge is enough to keep air from getting through. I'm guessing that the ink is its own seal to keep the bubble of ink around the output port. It might run out faster than on Earth if an air channel opened up inside the sponge.

Offline krytek

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There are three main technologies (HP, Epson and Canon). One has a jet that strikes the paper directly (HP), the other uses magnetic ink that's deviated and reused magnetically, but then it's let go when it has to print (Epson) and the third uses a bubble that's heated and sort of burst to send the ink (Canon). It would seem that the Epson process would be the most applicable to microgravity, since it's based on magnets and not on gravity. Incidentally, you can make a device to capture air borne ink with magnetic polarity. Thus, I suspect that the Epson system is somehow enhanced with stray ink capture mechanism.
Epson uses a piezoelectric system to create and propel droplets, there's no magnetic system involved. I believe that was a very old technology that never went anywhere.

In many Epson printers the cartridges are pressurized, but I believe still rely on gravity to get the ink down to the pickup tube. I doubt any would work in microgravity.

the magnetic was a dry powder to paper system it was manufactured and failed.    The Epson should work "propel droplets" is the key.  Only issue might be to change the gap from nozzles to paper with some form of cover so it doesn't spray into the atmosphere.
 

That "dry powder to paper" bit sounds like how a laser printer works.

Offline Joffan

I especially liked the fact that their "recovery force" consisted of a commercial salvage barge, two rubber boats, and a NASA P-3 Orion.  No aircraft carrier task force necessary.   :)

And that also make the greeting parade of vehicles for the shuttle seem extravagant. However things might get a little more involved if and when there is crew coming back in the Dragon.
Getting through max-Q for humanity becoming fully spacefaring

Offline dcporter

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However things might get a little more involved if and when there is crew coming back in the Dragon.

Hopefully by then they'll be landing on a big red X in Elon's back yard.

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