Author Topic: 3D printing rocket engines  (Read 81848 times)

Offline Prober

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Re: 3D printing rocket engines
« Reply #140 on: 01/27/2016 08:40 pm »
The Dragon Can Hover: SpaceX and Their 3D Printed SuperDraco Thrusters Take the Next Step Towards Propulsive Landing
http://3dprint.com/116669/spacex-dragon-2-thrusters/

It takes a lot of work to launch something into space, but it takes just as much, if not more, work to bring it back down to the ground again. SpaceX has been working on new ways to do both....

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=07Pm8ZY0XJI&feature=youtu.be

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Offline Prober

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Re: 3D printing rocket engines
« Reply #141 on: 03/01/2016 12:53 pm »
Note that although "3D printing" is fairly new you should keep in mind that additive techniques are at least half a century old.

Quite a lot of Aerojet designs used a combination of photoetched foils diffusion bonded into stacks.

The technology is also used by Velocisys and Meggit to build "printed circuit" heat exchangers and chemical reactors to deliver so called "process intensification."

Personally I always thought Aerojet could have pushed it much harder. They tended to do the stuff flat and then press (or use high pressure gas) to get it to shape.

Obvious extensions that came to mind were :-

Constructing parts as blocks but with either the final part inside the block, or internal cavities, defined by "perforations" around the outline. The little segments left holding parts inside the block would be quick to etch away, freeing the component.

Stretching or bending the unbonded foils should be much easier than doing it to the finished product, provided layer alignment can be preserved. It would mean that once the layers were bonded together they would need to have their edges trimmed to give the right size.

A technique in MEMS mfg is the use of "sacrificial" layers that can be preferentially etched to release objects.

Making structures that are curved as you go down the layers smoothly is probably too difficult. However by using a smaller number of masks could give a more viable "stepped" structure. Those steps should be preferentially etched, giving a (relatively) smooth result.

OTOH curves in the plane are relatively simple. Generally curves give smoother fluid flow.

It should be possible to fabricate in situ sensors based on fluids effects on the resonance frequencies of various structures, being driven and read by various acoustic transducers. Embedded electrical sensors are likely to more difficult due to the need to create insulating and encapsulating layers inside the structures.

By combining sub units split along different planes it would be possible to make more complex structures. this is relevant because of the difficulty of putting curves through layers.

Layer thickness can also be varied. Historically they have been foils the same thickness, but they could be substantially thicker, from a few 0.002" up to say 1 or 2 mm thick.

It should be possible to dispense with a photo resistant and go with a "direct write" exposure of the foils in a liquid, with the laser activating the liquid to etch the foil.

While these methods don't have the total flexibility of metal deposition of 3D printing they are likely to be much faster to produce a large unit quickly (or many small units as a block).

Just some possibilities which are also additive but not 3D printing.


I got the chance to try "platelet" fabrication technology in 1998-99 when we built this engine, which was LOX cooled, 2400 psia Pc design pressure, 6.6K-lbf.  As can be seen from the photos, individual copper foils were assembled in a stack and then diffusion bonded together.  It wasn't cheap at the time costing about $80K, but we fired it 40 times and it worked well.

Edit: spelling


http://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=33141.msg1498154#msg1498154



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Offline Prober

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Re: 3D printing rocket engines
« Reply #142 on: 03/10/2016 02:35 pm »
AeroJet Rocketdyne Successfully Test-Fires 3D Printed Rocket Injector
http://tinyurl.com/zv4zctt


"Their latest hot-fire test has demonstrated that a core main injector, 3D printed for use in their RL10 development engine, is suited for use in large rocket engines.

The core main injector was 3D printed using Selective Laser Melting (SLM) technology, allowing the defense manufacturer to 3D print a detailed and complex part capable of withstanding the intense environment of a rocket engine. The part is the result of a $6 million contract with the U.S. Air Force, secured earlier this month, for the 3D printing of parts to be used in liquid-fueled engines. The deal is meant to help the USAF replace Russian-made RD-180 engines for the United Launch Alliance’s Atlas V launch vehicle. During a hot-fire test performed with the USAF and NASA’s Glenn Research Center as part of the RL10 Additive Manufacturing Study (RAMS) program, the team validated the injector’s use in the actual RD-180 engine. " ;D ::)




« Last Edit: 03/10/2016 02:36 pm by Prober »
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Offline Prober

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Re: 3D printing rocket engines
« Reply #143 on: 03/12/2016 06:24 pm »
Finalists Announced for Additive Industries’ Metal 3D Printing Design Contest
http://3dprint.com/123866/additive-industries-finalists/

"In the Professional category, the Spanish team ATOS SE showed how to benefit from the additive manufacturing capabilities by creating a new integrated orientation system concept, which unifies a multiple parts solution into a one-part design named “Aerospace Integrated Bearing.” Germany-based TUHH – Liebherr (Technical University of Hamburg-Harburg) optimized the design of the bell crank for an Airbus Helicopter for weight and cost reduction. The third finalist in the Professional category, American firm Smith & Nephew, developed a regenerative liquid rocket engine and designed the light-weight, regenerative cooling liquid rocket nozzle and combustion chamber."
« Last Edit: 03/12/2016 06:34 pm by Prober »
2017 - Everything Old is New Again.
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Offline Prober

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Re: 3D printing rocket engines
« Reply #144 on: 03/26/2016 01:10 pm »
Update article on Rocketlabs

http://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=34421.msg1359569#msg1359569

Rocket Lab Preps to Send 3D Printed Rocket into Space


http://3dprintingindustry.com/2016/03/25/rocket-lab-preps-to-send-3d-printed-rocket-into-space/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+3dPrintingIndustry+%283D+Printing+Industry%29


"To create the thrust chamber, injector, turbopumps, and main propellant valves, Rocket Lab relied on Arcam’s electron beam melting technology, 3D printing the components from titanium alloys. Though most of the cost savings come from the use of the electric battery, altogether these innovations have reduced the cost of launching the rocket to just $4.9 million per launch (compared to SpaceX’s $54 million and ULA’s $225 million). These savings could potentially be passed onto the customer, making it less expensive to send small payloads into space.


On March 22, Rocket Lab announced that the Rutheford had completed its qualification tests, publishing the above video of a hot fire test in which the engine was fired for more than two and a half minutes. As a result, the company has planned to launch Electron from their site in New Zealand in the middle of this year. If all goes well, Electron will send satellites made by Spire into Earth orbit over the course of twelve missions from late 2016 to 2017."


Edit add linkage
« Last Edit: 03/26/2016 02:00 pm by Prober »
2017 - Everything Old is New Again.
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Offline Prober

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Re: 3D printing rocket engines
« Reply #145 on: 03/28/2016 09:23 pm »
2017 - Everything Old is New Again.
"I fear all we have done is to awaken a sleeping giant..." --Isoroku Yamamoto

Offline Prober

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« Last Edit: 05/25/2016 04:09 pm by Prober »
2017 - Everything Old is New Again.
"I fear all we have done is to awaken a sleeping giant..." --Isoroku Yamamoto

Offline Alf Fass

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Re: 3D printing rocket engines
« Reply #147 on: 05/25/2016 08:58 am »
The article that Prober linked to above has been moved to here:
http://3dprintingindustry.com/news/rocket-engine-completely-3d-printed-79813/
When my information changes, I alter my conclusions. What do you do, sir?
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Offline Prober

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Re: 3D printing rocket engines
« Reply #148 on: 05/25/2016 09:10 pm »
The article that Prober linked to above has been moved to here:
http://3dprintingindustry.com/news/rocket-engine-completely-3d-printed-79813/


even better this one....


Rocket Lab’s Electron Rocket Launch System & 3D Printed Rutherford Engine to Blast Off Later This Year


https://3dprint.com/135721/rocket-labs-electron-rocket/



2017 - Everything Old is New Again.
"I fear all we have done is to awaken a sleeping giant..." --Isoroku Yamamoto

Offline Prober

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Re: 3D printing rocket engines
« Reply #149 on: 07/27/2016 03:40 pm »
2017 - Everything Old is New Again.
"I fear all we have done is to awaken a sleeping giant..." --Isoroku Yamamoto

Offline Prober

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Re: 3D printing rocket engines
« Reply #150 on: 08/04/2016 06:49 pm »
Vector Space Systems Successfully Launches Sub-Orbital Satellite Prototype with 3D Printed Injector


https://3dprint.com/144895/vector-3d-printed-injector/


Vector Space Systems 3D printed a cheap mini rocket

https://3dprintingindustry.com/news/vector-space-systems-3d-printed-a-cheap-mini-rocket-91619/

Edit: add 2nd article & pics
« Last Edit: 08/09/2016 01:58 pm by Prober »
2017 - Everything Old is New Again.
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Offline Prober

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Re: 3D printing rocket engines
« Reply #151 on: 08/16/2016 07:03 pm »
Aerojet Rocketdyne to Mature 3D Printed MPS-130 CubeSat Propulsion System for NASA


https://3dprint.com/145962/aerojet-rocketdyne-nasa/



2017 - Everything Old is New Again.
"I fear all we have done is to awaken a sleeping giant..." --Isoroku Yamamoto

Offline Prober

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Re: 3D printing rocket engines
« Reply #152 on: 08/19/2016 07:08 pm »
2017 - Everything Old is New Again.
"I fear all we have done is to awaken a sleeping giant..." --Isoroku Yamamoto

Offline Prober

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Re: 3D printing rocket engines
« Reply #153 on: 08/31/2016 09:30 pm »
CubeCab Plans to Put Lots of CubeSats into Orbit with a Small 3D Printed Rocket and a Retired Fighter Jet


https://3dprint.com/147684/cubecab-cubesat-rocket-launch/



2017 - Everything Old is New Again.
"I fear all we have done is to awaken a sleeping giant..." --Isoroku Yamamoto

Offline Prober

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Re: 3D printing rocket engines
« Reply #154 on: 12/29/2016 11:08 pm »
NASA Fires Up 3D Printed Rocket Engine for Latest Series of Tests
https://3dprint.com/160079/nasa-3d-printed-engine-tests/


"In the latest tests, the engine was fired for 30 seconds (although it could have gone longer), allowing the engineers at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center to obtain, for the first time, information about how the engine’s 3D printed components perform together during a longer-duration burn. With the exception of the new combustion chamber, all of the major components in the test engine were 3D printed, including the fuel injector, fuel turbopump, valves, and more."




2017 - Everything Old is New Again.
"I fear all we have done is to awaken a sleeping giant..." --Isoroku Yamamoto

Offline lars.lauritsen.1

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Re: 3D printing rocket engines
« Reply #155 on: 12/30/2016 09:07 pm »
Wow this is so awesome stuff 😊 👍

Sendt fra min E2303 med Tapatalk


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